What Are You Listening To?

Johnny K

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As I look thru all these posts. I notice Jazz seems to be more prevalent than any other music form, and God knows I listen to more and more of it everyday. So either its an age thing, (I just turned 57) or be a drummer thing (lets face it, anyone can play Groove #1, Jazz drumming is very challenging to learn & play well) or a boredom with current music thing (I know I haven't found much to like these days, except up and coming jazzers).

But FWIW, I am still on a The Clash binge. I need to take the time to come up with an instrumental arrangement for The Magnificent Seven for my blues band. Even without the words, it's got a great groove (a little more right foot action than Groove #1, I think LOL) & and folks can dance to it. Good set #2 ender...Wave Bye, Bye! (for 15 min)
 

Elvis

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Happy Birthday Johnny K.
I'm right behind you (I turn 57 next month).
For me, its boredom playing pop music on a constant basis.
I can stand 2&4 for about a half hour, then I just stop playing...unless its something that I can get lost in, then I can stretch it to 45 minutes ( ;) ).
The Jazz triplet beat is different enough where it keeps my interest....probably helps that I didn't exactly start off playing Jazz, too.

Elvis
 
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Elvis

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Toshiko Mariano Quartet
Barnaby Records

00:00 A1 When You Meet Her
06:19 A2 Little T
19:28 B1 Toshiko's Elegy
27:56 B2 Deep River
33:28 B3 Long Yellow Road

Alto Saxophone – Charlie Mariano
Bass – Gene Cherico
Drums – Eddie Marshall
Piano – Toshiko Akiyoshi Mariano

Recorded at Nola Penthouse Sound Studios, New York, December 5, 1960.

P.S. - a little more insight from one of the comments accompanying this video (posted 1 week ago) ...After her marriage with Mariano broke up she married Lew Tabackin. They recorded 23 big band albums together. Today, Toshiko is 90 years old and Lew is 80. She was discovered back in 1952 by Oscar Peterson when he was on a tour of Japan.
 
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Johnny K

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Happy Birthday Johnny K.
I'm right behind you (I turn 57 next month).
For me, its boredom playing pop music on a constant basis.
I can stand 2&4 for about a half hour, then I just stop playing...unless its something that I can get lost in, then I can stretch it to 45 minutes ( ;) ).
The Jazz triplet beat is different enough where it keeps my interest....probably helps that I didn't exactly start off playing Jazz, too.

Elvis
I love a long jam. Our jazz group turns Freddie Hubbard's Little Sunflower into a 15 min jass/fusion jam and it's the one that our fans like the most. It's easy to get lost into a beloved song. It maks up for the other crap tunes we play too. The long jams remind me of days past when I was playing lead guitar in long gone blues band doing many Hendrix, SRV and Allman Brothers covers. Now its a whole new thing playing Jimmy Cobb's thing doing All Blues or So What, and Art Blakey doing Four with Miles Davis or Night in Tunsia, Moanin, and Dat Dere with the Jazz Messangers. I would have never bothered with it 30 years ago. My appreciation for jazz would have never been had I never picked up drums and I cant get enough of the great horn players. The last show I went too before the COVID thing was Benny Golson (92 years young) n January. He had Eddie Henderson playing with him and they were as sharp as ever.
 

Elvis

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I have often thought that one of the most historical events in music is the night The Allman Brother closed Fillmore East.

I had The Allman's Live at the Filmore East and Eat a Peach, and remember realizing that the end of Whippin' Post on Filmore East is also the beginning of Mountain Jam on Eat a Peach, and then realizing that means they played for pretty much an hour straight with, maybe, a 30 second break in the middle for applause.
...at 18, that was kind of a mind blower for me. =)

 

Elvis

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...mind further blown, btw, when I caught Donovan's original version on the radio and then remembered what the album said. =)

 
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5 Style

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As I look thru all these posts. I notice Jazz seems to be more prevalent than any other music form, and God knows I listen to more and more of it everyday. So either its an age thing, (I just turned 57) or be a drummer thing (lets face it, anyone can play Groove #1, Jazz drumming is very challenging to learn & play well) or a boredom with current music thing (I know I haven't found much to like these days, except up and coming jazzers).

But FWIW, I am still on a The Clash binge. I need to take the time to come up with an instrumental arrangement for The Magnificent Seven for my blues band. Even without the words, it's got a great groove (a little more right foot action than Groove #1, I think LOL) & and folks can dance to it. Good set #2 ender...Wave Bye, Bye! (for 15 min)
I can relate, I'm just a few years younger than you and though I've been a jazz fan (and more recently, a jazz drummer) for many years, I didn't really grow up with that music and only got into later, as an adult. I did however grow up with stuff like the Clash who I also love to this day... as well as all kinds of other rock type stuff, though the new wave/punk stuff that came out along with the clash in the late 70s-through the 80s is some of my favorites music.

I find that folks who are really into jazz that are my age and older, seem to have mostly sworn off rock music (though they might dig more subdued things like Steely Dan, but that's not really "rock."). I help to put on a yearly jazz festival and it's the younger players who are more like me and more agnostic about music. They all studied and can play the most complex, most subtle music, but they're likely to also be fans of Nirvana, hip hop and the like...
 


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