What did the drummer call his twin daughters?

mydadisjr

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I like the early '70's stuff... worst outfits and trying (just a little bit) to be hip.

Here's one from 1971... check out the nervous kid playing the (very hip) Fender 6 string bass

 

poco rit.

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I like the early '70's stuff... worst outfits and trying (just a little bit) to be hip.

Here's one from 1971... check out the nervous kid playing the (very hip) Fender 6 string bass

Lol woww. Very wholesome entertainment. I will say its quite infectious how everyone in the room looks so happy.
 

RayB

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Well Lawrence Welk employed one Mr Paul Humphrey......I always thought that was kewl....from Frank Zappa to Steely Dan to LW.....!!!!
bt
I'm glad you brought up Paul Humphrey. He was Welk's drummer the last few years the show ran. Very respected studio drummer, played with the performers listed above and I'm pretty sure he's on one or two Marvin Gaye records.
I read an interview with Humphrey were he said playing with Welk was a sweet gig. Got paid for a couple of rehearsals and (one) 1-hour show a week, and it was a pleasant, easy, good-paying gig. He said the previous drummer showed him the fine points of playing polkas. Humphrey said live music variety shows were disappearing at the time, so he was glad he got the gig.
I remember seeing some of the shows where Humphrey was the drummer. He was the only African-American in the band. I also read Jo Jones (yes, Papa Jo Jones) describe how he almost got the gig with Lawrence Welk way back when Welk was touring the mid-west. Jo wanted it because the pay was great and Welk wanted him; but the racial barrier at the time would've eliminated too many venues.
Lots of great jazz drummers back then started out playing in traveling music shows and they always described it as a great learning experience. Those gigs don't exist anymore, though there are great gigs when stars are on tour. Not many of us get those primo gigs.
 

BoomBoom

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Besides, AM rock radio played it's own version of sappy crap tunes. We'd have to sit through Percy Faith's "A Summer Place" (sounded like there were 4,000 violins buzzing your ears like bees in that arrangement, sorta cool), 5 minutes of commercials, then a good rock tune. Corny music was everywhere and at least Lawrence Welk was directed at an audience who wanted to hear him.

Who can forget Baby Elephant Walk?
 


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