What do you think about Dream Cymbals?

thenuge

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They are great cymbals. If you want less dark/trashy sounds, try the Contact or Energy lines. Youtube has some stuff I think. I recently played a Dark Matter that was amazing.

http://www.dreamcymbals.com/
 

Zickosman

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I had a 16" Contact crash that I personally picked out using all my other cymbals as comparisons. I really liked that cymbal. Alas, I hope someone else is enjoying it now. (What I really hope is that a very large man has cut it up in little pieces and is force feeding to that S.O.B. until he pukes, but I digress.) They really make some nice pies.
 

zacompston

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One of the biggest factors with these cymbals is that they need broken in for a while. I've had a couple that sounded pretty good (Especially for the money), and they've gotten better the more I play them. That being said, there are some downright bad sounding ones out there. So all of the above advice is certainly true.
 
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I've got an 18" Bliss Crash/ride, which I love. It didn't sound anything like the dream website sound files, but i still love it. It has held up to a few years of my bad technique and heavy hitting. Definitely try before you buy if you can.
 

drumreaper

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I tried to like them, I really did.

When they first came out, I ordered a couple online, a crash-ride and a ride, and was pretty underwhelmed.

I do have a dream 10" splash cymbal that is the best splash ever, hands down, though.

Haven't heard many of the newer ones, however. I may give them another look.

My local shop has them in now, and I've never given them as much as a tap.
 

Bluesman

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I do have a dream 10" splash cymbal that is the best splash ever, hands down, though.
I've been seriously considering getting one of these. I'm looking for a dark 10" splash that won't break the bank.

but--if it sounds like a wuhan, I won't -- because I already own a 10' wuhan.
 

drumreaper

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I've been seriously considering getting one of these. I'm looking for a dark 10" splash that won't break the bank.

but--if it sounds like a wuhan, I won't -- because I already own a 10' wuhan.
To me, it doesn't sound like a Wuhan one bit, at least not like the one I had. This one is like glass. Never heard a splash quite like it. It's a 10" Bliss...doesn't look like anything special, but I bought it because I had a sit-in call with, of all things, a Dixieland band last summer, and that calls for a splash. I popped by my local store, picked that up, and was blown out of the water at the gig. It surpassed my expectations.
 

Thumper

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I do have a dream 10" splash cymbal that is the best splash ever, hands down, though.
I've been seriously considering getting one of these. I'm looking for a dark 10" splash that won't break the bank.

but--if it sounds like a wuhan, I won't -- because I already own a 10' wuhan.

Check the bay; several dream contacts (my favorite) at really good prices. Don't remember exact prices but 10" and 12" splashes around $50 plus or minus.
 

Slappyfunkfingers

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Going to make a bunch of points so I apologize ahead of time for the lengthy reply.

Okay so here's a little background info to set this up. Before I bought Dream Bliss, Bliss Vintage and Contact I owned Paiste Signature and Sound Formula Hats, crashes and rides. Before I owned Paiste I owned Istanbul/Bosphorus and before Istanbul/Bosphorus I owned Zildjian. I am a Conservatory trained Percussionist, I play or have played in a bunch of different styles of music ranging from Classic Rock (Grateful Dead) and Metal Cover Bands, Big Band, Jazz Combos, Alt-Country, Classic Country, R&B, Funk, Percussion Chamber Music, Symphonic Orchestras and Punk.

1. Dream Bliss, Contacts and Bliss Vintage are hands down go to Jazz Cymbals for me at least. In fact I would go so far as to say that Dream as a brand are not optimised for a bunch of different styles of like say D.R.I Thrash Metal or various flavors of Punk..BUT they are great for Jazz...REALLY good for Jazz or anything else that isn't balls to the walls in sound pressure levels. They to me at least have the Turkish Vintage K with a twist sound at a fraction of the cost, given that a 1940's-50's era Zildjian K's can go for north $1000-$1300 or more these are a very viable alternative and the ones that aren't crap really do stack up to Bosphorus, Istanbul, your contemporary high end Zildjians and Sabians and even Vintage K. I for one LOVE the 2000 year old gong forging culture tradition from which these cymbals originate, yes they do have gong like complexity..but oh its such a good tonal complexity especially for any style of music or situation that isn't so loud that you or audience cant hear siad complexity. Super rich in overtones but with a tonal fundamental is a good thing in my book.

2.Now here's the thing..there is a lot of variation in the manufacturing process with Dream..MUCH LIKE VINTAGE ZILDJIAN K's or really any (Chineses, Turkish) hand hammered cymbal. I find the argument that you have a greater percentage of non- conforming quality cymbals with Dream to be a specious argument given that the same quality issues attributed to Dream are also present with Bosphorus, Istanbul or even the 1940's-1950's Zildjian K's. Yepp, I know this is heresy to say but not all Zildjian Ks from the 1940's,50's and 60's were keepers. There were quite a few crappy Zildjian cymbals made earlier in the history of the company. How do I know this you might ask? Testimonial by a bunch of working drummers I have met or studied with from the 1940's to present. What they told me is you really needed to play the K's made before 1970's and it was particularly difficult to find decent K hi-hats because one or the other top or bottom would suck. According to the people I have trained with and talked to one of the great innovations with the introduction with the Zildjian A's was more tonal consistency and or more quality consistency as a result of machine manufacturing in comparison to the K's.

3. From an ARTISTIC stand point..variation with cymbal tonal or timbre quality is a good thing. Why you might ask ? Because every performing artist musician worth two shits at some point wants to establish their own style and sound. Having one of kind gem cymbals helps with this. And one of kind gem cymbals are what you can have with Dream Cymbals just like many other hand hammered custom manufactured cymbals. Yes, you can opt for more tonally consistent cymbal Brands from manufacturers like Paiste who incidentally is probably one of the few cymbal manufacturers I would ever feel comfortable purchasing a cymbal sight unseen and heard because they are that consistent from my anecdotal experience. But then again you pretty much are going to sound more or less like every other schmuck that has the same Paiste cymbal as you. So like many have said you need to hear and play Dreams before you buy and a good local Drum Shop (eg.Jim Rupp Columbus Pro Percussion) should select the keepers. But most good drum shop owners should also test Istanbul, Bosphorus, UFIP etc.. Perhaps more Dreams get sent back then other hand crafted cymbal brands, meh..when Dreams are good they are amazingly good to the point of being my go to Jazz Cymbal...especially Jazz Combo -trio, quartets, quintets etc which is where they really shine, although I have received a lot of positive feedback in the Big Band projects I have played them in.

4. I am currently pricing for a new set of cymbals because I am playing in roots rock/cowpunk band in the style of the Drive By Truckers or Hank III and I need something that can cut in live music situations pushing SPL 110 db+. Dream doesn't or isn't currently optimized imho for these types of situations, going to go back to Paiste for very focused-concise tonal spectrum that can cut, but doesn't sound like a glorified cowbell or car brake drum. I would not choose Dream for an Iron Maiden Tribute band or doing Slayer, Misfits, Ramones, or Corrosion of Conformity covers - that's not the sound aesthetic they are optimised for.

5. Dream's are definitely tonal to the point of almost being in a key. I pointed an oscillator scope tuning app on my cell phone to the bells of each cymbal and each cymbal was less than a half step from the pitches of G, F#, C, E etc. that's pretty dam tonal. What prompted me to do this was I was playing with a jazz upright bass player that had perfect pitch and he said and I quote " those mother$%^^'s are pitched " , went home tested them then conveyed test results to said perfect pitch bass player and yeah he confirmed. I now have the various Dreams labeled by their fundamental overtone pitches.

6. I will also add that Dream might be a tad more fragile in terms of patina, you will want to wipe sweat and fingerprints off and or otherwise keep them in a fairly stable climate because their protective coating deteriorates after a few years. At which point you will find that you do need to clean and polish them more frequently then other cymbal brands.
 
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ggmerino

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I've been seriously considering getting one of these. ...
but--if it sounds like a wuhan, I won't -- because I already own a 10' wuhan.
I thought all Dream, Eastsound and Wuhan cymbals were made in the same China Gong factory in Wuhan. Not surprising if they sound a little bit similar. Although, I think they probably all have independent lines with distinct specifications. Don't know about the B20 blanks.

https://www.pearldrummersforum.com/...of-the-Dream-Eastsound-and-Wuhan-Gong-Factory
 
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michaelg

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I liked the dreams i had, which were a 18,19,22.
Mine were fairly washy with a long decay which is why i eventually sold them, but under the right touch and player they would be stellar.
 

Slappyfunkfingers

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I liked the dreams i had, which were a 18,19,22.
Mine were fairly washy with a long decay which is why i eventually sold them, but under the right touch and player they would be stellar.
Right, if you are playing dinner music ballads at less than 80bpm..all that wash or what some call "Dragons Breath" is a good thing because it fills the music and at those tempos the cymbals have room to breath. At faster tempo's the wash will build but its not over powering with the right stick and technique (think Tony Williams "Foot Prints" or "Freedom Jazz Dance").

Again what are you asking the cymbal to do. If I need that cymbal to get above 105-110 dB, which easily gives some temporary tinnitus after minutes and more permanent damage after longer exposures (like an entire show) and hence will have 25 db reducing ear plugs at quarter note 190 bpm and needs to be present in the house mix..well your ride cymbal is going to need to sound closer to a cast iron frying pan then a jazz cymbal... its not going to work so well. I could go on about why some metal and punk drummers think ride cymbals are basically pointless (understandably so) for their music styles because of said constraints -your ride after a certain point just need to stop sounding like a ride cymbal and more like a chunk of metal even if it's mic'd..without much overtone to give it any character whatsoever.

Also I found that after I played or broke my Blisses in they dried up-my approach was to put them on an oversized paper jogger and let them vibrate non stop for about 24-36 hours..perfecto! If one listens to early jazz and even bebop a good bit of timekeeping was done on hi hats, which had plenty of wash, so much that it's often attributed to the aesthetic of jazz music, i.e. the capabilities of the musical instruments specific to its period in history being attributed to the said style of music. Hence why "K' sound remains ground zero or holy grail for anybody wanting to play Hard Bop.
 

dustjacket

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"Also I found that after I played or broke my Blisses in they dried up-my approach was to put them on an oversized paper jogger and let them vibrate non stop for about 24-36 hours..perfecto!"

Say whaaa? Never heard of this method, but very intriguing.
 

skelt101

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3. From an ARTISTIC stand point..variation with cymbal tonal or timbre quality is a good thing. Why you might ask ? Because every performing artist musician worth two shits at some point wants to establish their own style and sound. Having one of kind gem cymbals helps with this. And one of kind gem cymbals are what you can have with Dream Cymbals just like many other hand hammered custom manufactured cymbals. Yes, you can opt for more tonally consistent cymbal Brands from manufacturers like Paiste who incidentally is probably one of the few cymbal manufacturers I would ever feel comfortable purchasing a cymbal sight unseen and heard because they are that consistent from my anecdotal experience. But then again you pretty much are going to sound more or less like every other schmuck that has the same Paiste cymbal as you. So like many have said you need to hear and play Dreams before you buy and a good local Drum Shop (eg.Jim Rupp Columbus Pro Percussion) should select the keepers. But most good drum shop owners should also test Istanbul, Bosphorus, UFIP etc.. Perhaps more Dreams get sent back then other hand crafted cymbal brands, meh..when Dreams are good they are amazingly good to the point of being my go to Jazz Cymbal...especially Jazz Combo -trio, quartets, quintets etc which is where they really shine, although I have received a lot of positive feedback in the Big Band projects I have played them in.
While I understand what you're getting at, I might respectfully disagree with point 3. An artist's tone has (perhaps) as much to do with their touch/technique as it does the instrument itself. Drummer A's tone might not sound the same as Drummer B's tone when using the same cymbal, especially if different tools (e.g. sticks, mallets, brushes, etc.) are employed. Just sayin'...
 

GeeDeeEmm

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I thought all Dream, Eastsound and Wuhan cymbals were made in the same China Gong factory in Wuhan. Not surprising if they sound a little bit similar. Although, I think they probably all have independent lines with distinct specifications. Don't know about the B20 blanks.

https://www.pearldrummersforum.com/...of-the-Dream-Eastsound-and-Wuhan-Gong-Factory
Thanks for posting that link. Very interesting photos.

So, Wuhan manufactures Wuhan, Dream, and Eastsound (?????) cymbals. That has me wondering if they are the only cymbal factory in China? I wonder if Centent cymbals are made there, too. To me, it's not a big deal that many brands are manufactured by one company. As has always been the case - and especially recently with China - the factory makes the buyers' cymbals to the buyers' specifications. So, while it's highly likely that one will hear similarities between the brands, the end product is determined by the brand.

And the prices! That's where it becomes a bit dicey to me. One has to believe that they all pay the same price, but the retail prices vary wildly.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Tama CW

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There is another line not mentioned above.....Dream Ignition. Which is supposedly their starter line. But having had some 14" Dream Ignition hi hats, they were far from a starter line....basically intermediate and with a nice sound and feel, not trashy, clean and crisp.... not far from A. Zildjians. I also had an Ignition 20" ride which was pretty gongy and trashy. Yet, I found a good home for it to someone who wanted that sound. The 18" Contact Crash/Ride is the one I found the most interesting.
 

Slappyfunkfingers

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I am citing older Thread I posted regarding Dream cymbals thinking it is pertinent and also might be useful to those who might have missed it. Also its substantial post so there is some reading.


"Going to make a bunch of points so I apologize ahead of time for the lengthy reply.

Okay so here's a little background info to set this up. Before I bought Dream Bliss, Bliss Vintage and Contact I owned Paiste Signature and Sound Formula Hats, crashes and rides. Before I owned Paiste I owned Istanbul/Bosphorus and before Istanbul/Bosphorus I owned Zildjian. I am a Conservatory trained Percussionist, I play or have played in a bunch of different styles of music ranging from Classic Rock (Grateful Dead) and Metal Cover Bands, Big Band, Jazz Combos, Alt-Country, Classic Country, R&B, Funk, Percussion Chamber Music, Symphonic Orchestras and Punk.

1. Dream Bliss, Contacts and Bliss Vintage are hands down go to Jazz Cymbals for me at least. In fact I would go so far as to say that Dream as a brand are not optimised for a bunch of different styles of like say D.R.I Thrash Metal or various flavors of Punk..BUT they are great for Jazz...REALLY good for Jazz or anything else that isn't balls to the walls in sound pressure levels. They to me at least have the Turkish Vintage K with a twist sound at a fraction of the cost, given that a 1940's-50's era Zildjian K's can go for north $1000-$1300 or more these are a very viable alternative and the ones that aren't crap really do stack up to Bosphorus, Istanbul, your contemporary high end Zildjians and Sabians and even Vintage K. I for one LOVE the 2000 year old gong forging culture tradition from which these cymbals originate, yes they do have gong like complexity..but oh its such a good tonal complexity especially for any style of music or situation that isn't so loud that you or audience cant hear siad complexity. Super rich in overtones but with a tonal fundamental is a good thing in my book.

2.Now here's the thing..there is a lot of variation in the manufacturing process with Dream..MUCH LIKE VINTAGE ZILDJIAN K's or really any (Chineses, Turkish) hand hammered cymbal. I find the argument that you have a greater percentage of non- conforming quality cymbals with Dream to be a specious argument given that the same quality issues attributed to Dream are also present with Bosphorus, Istanbul or even the 1940's-1950's Zildjian K's. Yepp, I know this is heresy to say but not all Zildjian Ks from the 1940's,50's and 60's were keepers. There were quite a few crappy Zildjian cymbals made earlier in the history of the company. How do I know this you might ask? Testimonial by a bunch of working drummers I have met or studied with from the 1940's to present. What they told me is you really needed to play the K's made before 1970's and it was particularly difficult to find decent K hi-hats because one or the other top or bottom would suck. According to the people I have trained with and talked to one of the great innovations with the introduction with the Zildjian A's was more tonal consistency and or more quality consistency as a result of machine manufacturing in comparison to the K's.

3. From an ARTISTIC stand point..variation with cymbal tonal or timbre quality is a good thing. Why you might ask ? Because every performing artist musician worth two shits at some point wants to establish their own style and sound. Having one of kind gem cymbals helps with this. And one of kind gem cymbals are what you can have with Dream Cymbals just like many other hand hammered custom manufactured cymbals. Yes, you can opt for more tonally consistent cymbal Brands from manufacturers like Paiste who incidentally is probably one of the few cymbal manufacturers I would ever feel comfortable purchasing a cymbal sight unseen and heard because they are that consistent from my anecdotal experience. But then again you pretty much are going to sound more or less like every other schmuck that has the same Paiste cymbal as you. So like many have said you need to hear and play Dreams before you buy and a good local Drum Shop (eg.Jim Rupp Columbus Pro Percussion) should select the keepers. But most good drum shop owners should also test Istanbul, Bosphorus, UFIP etc.. Perhaps more Dreams get sent back then other hand crafted cymbal brands, meh..when Dreams are good they are amazingly good to the point of being my go to Jazz Cymbal...especially Jazz Combo -trio, quartets, quintets etc which is where they really shine, although I have received a lot of positive feedback in the Big Band projects I have played them in.

4. I am currently pricing for a new set of cymbals because I am playing in roots rock/cowpunk band in the style of the Drive By Truckers or Hank III and I need something that can cut in live music situations pushing SPL 110 db+. Dream doesn't or isn't currently optimized imho for these types of situations, going to go back to Paiste for very focused-concise tonal spectrum that can cut, but doesn't sound like a glorified cowbell or car brake drum. I would not choose Dream for an Iron Maiden Tribute band or doing Slayer, Misfits, Ramones, or Corrosion of Conformity covers - that's not the sound aesthetic they are optimised for.

5. Dream's are definitely tonal to the point of almost being in a key. I pointed an oscillator scope tuning app on my cell phone to the bells of each cymbal and each cymbal was less than a half step from the pitches of G, F#, C, E etc. that's pretty dam tonal. What prompted me to do this was I was playing with a jazz upright bass player that had perfect pitch and he said and I quote " those mother$%^^'s are pitched " , went home tested them then conveyed test results to said perfect pitch bass player and yeah he confirmed. I now have the various Dreams labeled by their fundamental overtone pitches.

6. I will also add that Dream might be a tad more fragile in terms of patina, you will want to wipe sweat and fingerprints off and or otherwise keep them in a fairly stable climate because their protective coating deteriorates after a few years. At which point you will find that you do need to clean and polish them more frequently then other cymbal brands."
 


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