What Does Paiste Do That Other Companies Don't?

Matched Gripper

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Paiste manufactures extremely high end cymbals.
And with high end I mean trebly.
B)
After listening to the DCP video, every line of Paiste cymbal (exept the Signature Dark Energy) seemed to have the same "Pshshshsh" sound. Not much variation from that video.
 

Neal Pert

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Well, you are either going to prize "consistency" or you're going to prize "uniqueness," I guess, and I tend to prize the latter more than the former.

I was pretty frustrated with the video for exactly the reasons a few of you mentioned: You can't tell everything you need to know about a cymbal by bashing it. I wanted to hear the stick sounds on the crashes and such and I wanted to hear different volumes.

It's funny because the cymbals that caught my ear the most as something pretty far away from Zildjian were not the 2002s but rather the 602s-- especially the classic ones, less so the MEs. And that's odd, I know, given the alloy and all that.

I think a lot about cymbals as "families" or "sets," and I can imagine some point in the future when I grab a set of 602s or 2002s for recording. For now I'm all set with the Zildjians and Bosphorus I've got.
 

DavedrumsTX

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I watched most of the DCP video of the various Paiste lines. As I watched, I often had a thought like, "Oh, those sound like my redesigned As," or "those sound like K Customs" or whatever. What was striking to me in the video was (1) how similar the product lines really all were to each other when it came to those core models and (2) how few of the lines one couldn't come close to duplicating in other companies' lines. Now, that's true for all companies, I'm sure. And the fact that Shane kept it to essentially the same models of cymbals in each line without taking a wider angle on the uniqueness of each line probably contributed to the sameness. But a few questions:

1. After having watched that video, which lines did you hear and think, "OK, those don't sound like anyone else's cymbals? If I want that sound, I'd get Paistes."

2. For those of you more familiar with the Paiste lines: Which cymbals would you have put up as most representative of your favorite lines? Which models would you say are most distinctly Paiste?

3. Do you think that the way the cymbals were all played-- as rock cymbals-- hid the distinctiveness of the Paiste lines?
I’ve had flings with Sabian, Zildjian and Meinl & Bosphorus but always come back to Paiste. They all sound right in the mix and the mics love them. There is a Paiste sound. Either you love it or don’t. I also love Paiste’s quality and consistency.
I will say that I like to mix series up. At the present I have a combo of Giant Beat, Big Beat and Masters on my studio set up.
 

chevvies

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Listen to pair of 70s 15" 602 S/E HH then you will know :).
 

Slingwig26

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I watched most of the DCP video of the various Paiste lines. As I watched, I often had a thought like, "Oh, those sound like my redesigned As," or "those sound like K Customs" or whatever. What was striking to me in the video was (1) how similar the product lines really all were to each other when it came to those core models and (2) how few of the lines one couldn't come close to duplicating in other companies' lines. Now, that's true for all companies, I'm sure. And the fact that Shane kept it to essentially the same models of cymbals in each line without taking a wider angle on the uniqueness of each line probably contributed to the sameness. But a few questions:

1. After having watched that video, which lines did you hear and think, "OK, those don't sound like anyone else's cymbals? If I want that sound, I'd get Paistes."

2. For those of you more familiar with the Paiste lines: Which cymbals would you have put up as most representative of your favorite lines? Which models would you say are most distinctly Paiste?

3. Do you think that the way the cymbals were all played-- as rock cymbals-- hid the distinctiveness of the Paiste lines?
I didn’t see the video, but I like Paiste. I used either a full set of 602’s.
14 or 15 SEHH. 16,17 18 thin crash, 19 or 20 med ride or 21 blue label heavy. Also a 20” Twenty china.
I also use 14 or 15 GB top over Rude bot or the 602 SE bot and 17 2002 thin crash, 18 GB , 18 2002 crash, 20” 2002 china and 22” 2002 (black label, 1977) ride. Among others.
 

richardh253

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I remember when Paistes were introduced in a 1968 Ludwig Drummer magazine, I had never heard of them before. About 6 years ago there was a good buy on Sweetwater for a Paiste 2002 cymbal pack - 22, 18, 16, 15 soundedge HHs. I took a chance on them, and agree with what everyone has said, they sounded totally unique. Similar words - shimmer, bright, sweet, "clean," pingy. I especially loved the soundedge HHs. I eventually added a 17, 19, 24 and two splashes, 10 and 12. When I had to sell most of my stuff for a downsize move, it was a hard choice of which cymbal set to keep, but I found the market for the Paistes was strong and they all went to good new homes.

BTW kudos to Sweetwater - the original set had been dropped somewhere en route to me, as each cymbal had a ding cut out on the edge, something got right thru into that box and got all of them. Sweetwater replaced the entire set immediately. Good folks.
 

dale w miller

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As someone who has or had almost every line Paiste makes or made and has been playing them exc the 2002 and Signature series are what scream their sound to me.

Rude does as well, but in a different way and they were too heavy for me.

I love almost every line, but I’ve set to get any of the Masters series. The ones that sounded the least like Paiste is known for was the Twenty line, made with B20, and they have been discontinued.
 

dale w miller

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Last I looked they have sound samples of every cymbal on their site. There’s no need to count on these videos if people are.

I just traded for my first Paiste.

It's a 20" Prototype Signature ride. I'm not sure if this is a series or not though. Are the Prototypes one off cymbals like the name would suggest? Because the hammering on mine does seem unique even to other Prototypes.
The Prototypes are unique cymbals for sure, but there is not a thing wrong with them. They come about not only attempting potentially new lines, but also because they are not the exact same cymbal they were trying for. If it doesn’t perfectly match the line & model, they put them to the side and release the ones that are good within themselves.
 

henrikrathje

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I own a lot of cymbals.. 50% are Paiste. Theyare all kind of brands...a and k Zildjian, meinl, tosco, Istanbul Agop, Dream....

What I love are the Paiste ability to mix and blend with any other brand regardless of alloy.

My favorites are 2002, 2002 black big beat (both B8) and signature (B14.5-ish).. ohh.. and 15" 900 Natural heavy hihat (a hidden gem).
 

JimmySticks

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Prototypes are unique cymbals for sure, but there is not a thing wrong with them. They come about not only attempting potentially new lines, but also because they are not the exact same cymbal they were trying for. If it doesn’t perfectly match the line & model, they put them to the side and release the ones that are good within themselves.
Wow, great information there! Now I know why I can't find a similar one to mine anywhere!

That is really an interesting concept. I'm not sure if anyone else does the same thing, but yeah, that's pretty darn cool! And I am loving this cymbal as well. Great jazzy ride.

Thanks, that made my day! :D
 

dale w miller

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Wow, great information there! Now I know why I can't find a similar one to mine anywhere!

That is really an interesting concept. I'm not sure if anyone else does the same thing, but yeah, that's pretty darn cool! And I am loving this cymbal as well. Great jazzy ride.

Thanks, that made my day! :D
Glad to have helped. Do you have a picture of it?
 

Phantomlimb777

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My Paiste traditionals are higher pitched than my Agops. They are more sparkly and project more. Paiste also makes the most consistent bells of any company.
 

ringoskywalker

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Hi guys,
I would say the the biggest difference is the way, Paiste cymbals translate in a recording/live situation within the musicial context of the total band sound. I am a very happy Paiste-player for more than 20 years, but I came from playing Sabian, Zildjian and UFIP and got in touch with Paiste cymbals and just started using them live and never looked for anything else....
I went through almost every series over all these years. However, when you play e.g. an old K or an Istanbul without other musicians around, you probably like the "low end" and the darkness of these cymbals. Paiste cymbals (although the different series do sound quire differnet to eachother) sound as if they are kind of pre eq-ed. They always work great in recording music because they already are in the place where they -from an engineers point of view - work best. I had two experiences which are nice to share (i hope): First, a few years back I watched Ryan Adams live at Glastonbury Festival. I loved the cymbal sound of his drummer so much, that I nearly got crazy. I was hoping to catch a few of one of his cymbals to spot the brand. I feared that it would be an Istanbul or Zildjians. When I finally saw a shot, I could belive my eyes that there where Paiste's. Even funnier: I checked the cymbal setup online and found out that the drummer played exactly the same cymbals that I play myself...
Second, I played a show in Amsterdam last year and in the audience was the European distributer for Istanbul cymbals which I know really well. After the show he came to me and his first question was: What are those cymbals? They are amazing!

I play mostly the (discontinued) Twenty's, Masters and Traditionals. But I also love the Giant Beat's for louder stuff. The 602 Modern Essentials, Signature Dark Energy and Signatures are also fantastic cymbals depending on the musicial situation.

But taste differs and this is only MHO. :)

One of the biggest advantages beside their sound is indeed the consistency. You can have the same cymbal (for 95%) anywhere in the world. I really love that!
 

JimmySticks

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Steve Jordan really got me into Paiste. I totally stole the 20/22 light ride thing from him.
I think Hutch has become a pretty great ambassador for the jazz side of things...
So Greg says," if you have a question just ask and I'll stop playing"...c'mon man, nobody in the audience is stupid enough to do that! :icon_lol:
 

michaelg

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I brought 3 beautiful 18" crashes to a recording session last week. Paiste masters dark, signature fast and a Zildjian A thin.

The producer preferred the Masters by a wide margin.
 

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