What drum hardware have you been surprised by?

YabaMTV

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For me it’s DW. And not in a good way. Have a kit in trad sizes that I love but over many years, I have had almost all of their hardware stuff break or fail. I’m as surprised as anyone else but it’s true: pedals, spurs, tom holders, brackets, tension rods, you name it. Problems with all of the fabled DW hardware.

On the other hand, I’ve got some 25 year old cheap Tama Swingstar stands that have outperformed everything else and just refuse to die.

How about you?
No issues with DW here but I agree that Tama has made and still makes solid gear.
 

David M Scott

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The new Taiwanese Dixon products are first class / professional . Not the same Dixon we used to know .

The new Yamaha aluminum are worth every penny . Sturdy , light and fold up small . No more heavy lifting for decent hardware that won't budge .
Hey Benny
from the pic you appear to be like me in “the senior side” I’m 80 and still gig and play every day. Last summer I bought the Yamaha Crosstown Aluminum hardware and I can’t believe the quality. the cymbal stands stay where set and that fold up hi hat. Is a Dream in that it folds up to nothing, is very sturdy and has a light action which is all I want at my age. The snare stand is well built but I’m cautious and try not to bend it at the point where the basket is fastened to its support rod but maybe im being over cautious. A few years back I switched to a Tama 900S Cobra kick pedal and while it looks heavy it’s really not and made like a tank.
i have had my kick knee replaced and it doesn’t have the flexibility of a natural but the Cobra lets me play a 4hour gig with no discomfort..love the footboard return spring. Oh and as regards the hat, my knees is weak and I’m waiting for a replacement but the Crosstown hat lets me do it all where my old Premier was a chore after a couple of hours. Kudos to Yamaha
 
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For me it’s DW. And not in a good way. Have a kit in trad sizes that I love but over many years, I have had almost all of their hardware stuff break or fail. I’m as surprised as anyone else but it’s true: pedals, spurs, tom holders, brackets, tension rods, you name it. Problems with all of the fabled DW hardware.

On the other hand, I’ve got some 25 year old cheap Tama Swingstar stands that have outperformed everything else and just refuse to die.

How about you?
i confess to bias , but yamaha is really good . there's a variety of sizes / weights { lightweight up to v heavy duty } - not only does it always work & is straightforward , it also doesn't look like it belongs on the side of an oil-rig .
 

Core Creek

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I’m not surprised to see a lot of DW issues here. I never understood the appeal. Aside from a 5000 bass pedal I bought new in the 90’s (and just sold recently because I rarely used it), almost every DW stand or pedal has been clunky, over-engineered or unstable. I got a DW5000 hi hat stand with an electronic kit that was horrible. And I always thought the 9000 bass pedals were so heavy and clunky.... I never understood why they were so expensive.

I have always loved Tama hardware since I started out in the 80’s. I still have some original stands from my set of Granstars. The last generation of Iron Cobra pedals are amazing and you can get them pretty cheap these days.... I found a double pedal with the case for $50 on Craigslist recently! And I love the lever glide system on my Tama hi-hats. I think Tama has always made great little improvements over the years and I still prefer their hardware over most anything else.
 

Han

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1980's Premier, which seems to be Yamaha, is still working just fine today after thousands of hours of use.
 

Tom Holder

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i play ludwig 1123-1 hi-hat, 1400 cymbal stands and a tama-camco bass pedal.

back in the day had yamaha, dw, and rogers BIG hardware with double bracing and boom stands.

believe me or not - you don't need the bulk. i use 24'' cymbals and 16'' hats.
I use an 1124 hi hat, which is pretty similar to your 1123. I love that hi hat. Nice and light, smooth and quiet, stays put thanks to the toe spur. Great stuff. I wish they still made it.
 

Slingwig26

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For me it’s DW. And not in a good way. Have a kit in trad sizes that I love but over many years, I have had almost all of their hardware stuff break or fail. I’m as surprised as anyone else but it’s true: pedals, spurs, tom holders, brackets, tension rods, you name it. Problems with all of the fabled DW hardware.

On the other hand, I’ve got some 25 year old cheap Tama Swingstar stands that have outperformed everything else and just refuse to die.

How about you?
I am surprised by Yamaha crosstown hardware. I love it. It is light AND sturdy, unlike DW ultra light. Also hate DW pedals. I actually broke the footboard in half, horizontally across the pedal. I love the Ludwig Atlas Pro pedal so much I bought 3. I also love the ludwig Atlas mount over bulky suspension mounts. Easier to change heads.
 

robertgarven

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I am a DW guy, and have a few good friends who work there. I support the company as they are about 10 minutes from my house and I like to support local companies. I only buy the best stuff so I have all their 9000 series hardware. Have not had any problems but this is my home set, and doesn't travel much. Playing all over the world I see lots of backline kits and learned anything that makes it to backline will break or already be broken! HA
Paiste set 2.jpg
 

mmann

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Ive been using the same peaqrl tom arms and a few cymbal stands/pieces since I was 16. i'm 48. 32 years is a long time and this is gear that has been in the clubs 50 nights a year since I was 20. Ive also had terrific luck with dw5000 pedals, I played the last one until the teeth on the sprocket wore out. That was about 25 years. Love it.
 

Bandit

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I am a DW guy, and have a few good friends who work there. I support the company as they are about 10 minutes from my house and I like to support local companies. I only buy the best stuff so I have all their 9000 series hardware. Have not had any problems but this is my home set, and doesn't travel much. Playing all over the world I see lots of backline kits and learned anything that makes it to backline will break or already be broken! HA View attachment 442579
The best part about using DW hardware is that you don't have to go to the gym, if you are gigging their hardware. :)
 

Matched Gripper

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The Tama Dyna-Sync bass drum pedal. I tried one out at Sam Ash a few months ago. Very cool looking pedal, especially the black beater. Then I saw the price. That surprised me!
 

Beesting

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Good #1: The new(er) Ludwig Atlas Classic flat-base cymbal stands. I have a mix of straights and booms and even though they're small and light-weight they hold everything without budging (even my 22" K Heavy Ride and 22" Swish Knocker, both on booms).

Good #2: The new(er) Ludwig Atlas Pro snare stand (with the Pillar Clutch). Unlike my cymbals, which tend to stay put, my snare drum has always tended to creep around on the floor. I've used original Walberg & Auge Buck Rogers stands, original (early '70s) Ludwig Atlas snare stands, top-of-the-line Pearl stands (with the universal adjustment) and my snare has always danced around under my sticks. But this new Atlas Pro stand absolutely stays put; no matter how hard I play it doesn't move one bit. It weighs a friggin' ton, but it works.

Bad #1: Yamaha single-braced cymbal stands. I bought 5 or 6 brand-new in 1984 and every single one of them wound up with dents on the pipes (from the wing-nuts) that deformed the pipes so much they couldn't be telescoped and eventually the stands couldn't be used at all.

Bad #2: Every single piece of drum hardware made before the 1970s that wasn't Rogers Swiv-O-Matic, the aforementioned Walberg Buck Rogers stand or the Walberg rail consolette tom holder. All the rest was 100% junk that didn't do even the minimum of what it was supposed to. The mounted tom holders in particular were completely worthless — the reason that everyone's drumset looked the same in the 1940s was that those holders only let you put your mounted toms in one position (and didn't hold them in that position very well). And forget about the bass drum pedals. You young whipper-snappers don't realize just how good you have it when it comes to hardware!
My Yamaha single brace stands from '84 look and work just like they did in '84. Great hardware. As far as old bass drum pedals go...I'm still using my 50s vintage Ludwig Speed Master pedal. Original beater and hardware. Only the leather connecting strap has been replaced, nothing else.
 

SpinaDude

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The best part about using DW hardware is that you don't have to go to the gym, if you are gigging their hardware. :)
Yeah, man. I'll second that. Their gear weighs a TON. Seems to be flexible enough to do what it needs to do, but I haven;t messed with it enough to know for sure. It is sold though, which it should be for having a greater mass density than granite.
 

cruddola

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Yamaha 2nd generation HexRack all the way! The 80-90s spherical rack clamp tom holders are the bomb. Yamaha 900 Series stands all the way too. I even use the 900 series boom-stands for my photo studio lighting. They're that good. I also have a half-ton (literally) of Tama Titan hardware that I inherited from my brother's passing. Their omni-sphere is also the bomb.
 

Tman

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I can add a few items to this list for myself... the first is the Tama Classic Series single tom stand (HTS58F). I use to struggle to get happy with a standard snare stand holding up my rack tom (leg splay, height adjustment, choking the tone) and then the Tama came along and changed all that! A very flat bottom that slides easily under my kick, solid as a rock and lifts very tall. The best part is the sound... I do not really perceive much dampening on the tom at all. I've no idea why not as it's essentially just a tall snare stand, but all my toms still sound full and open on it.

Speaking of stands, I am a HUGE fan the Gibraltar 8700 flat base hardware having several sets... for me, it's the sweet spot in the intersection between price, stability, full features and weight. Classic flat base looks but all the benefits of strong new hardware.

Last would be the Porter & Davies Tactile Drum Thrones... the most insane drum purchase I have ever made and now I am addicted to it!
I have the Gibraltar Flat base stands. They’re excellent, a bit heavy but that allows my 20 inch crash to stay put. I’ve tried other flat based stands new Ludwig are good, as was Pearl and Tama. DW was a big disappointment. I never liked any of their hardware lines but I gave the ultralight stands a try. Sold them after a two low volume gigs.
 


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