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What drummer had the most affect on their bands sound / identity??

Steech

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I think Eddie Vedder wanted PJ to be perceived as more of a punk rock band, not a bunch of musos. He didn’t like Dave A. being in Modern Drummer and endorsing gear. He was stung by criticism that the other Seattle bands were more legit alternatives to major label corporate rock than Pearl Jam. Getting Jack Irons in the band gave them some street cred.

I don’t think they were a punk band. I saw them as having more roots in metal/hard rock and they were kind of, uh jammy on that first record. Stone and Jeff were glam rockers, McCready was a SRV wannabe at that point. Dave A.’s style was perfect for that early material and kind of defined ‘90s alt rock drumming, for better or worse. Much like Vedder’s voice back then, I find the style a bit dated today.

I love Matt with Soundgarden but not at all with Pearl Jam. When I listen to that live drum cam video of Even Flow, he sounds too fast, too stiff, lacking in dynamics and just not grooving to my ears.
Yup. I wrote about this elsewhere in this thread, imo Matt was a completely wasted talent in Pearl Jam.
 

Lennykenard

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The Rev. Avenged Sevenfold has not been the same (at least for me) since his passing.
 

richardh253

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The most recent Drumhistory podcast on Bonham makes a very good case for how his sound was indeed very much a full 25% plus of the 4-part contribution that made Zep Zep.
 

JimmySticks

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So many good ones I missed...... there's a lot of drummers that aren't "in your face" but have amazing playing for the band/music such as Nick Mason and Phil Rudd....ect.

I agree.

I'd put John Hartmann from the Doobie Bros. in that category. His tight pocket playing and the grooves he laid down with bassist Tiran Porter were just iconic rock & roll.
 

equipmentdork

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I'm going to go with Ian Mosley of Marillion. The proof is in the sound. Just listen:
Script for a Jester's Tear - Prog rock bar band that got lucky. Loping, loose drum tracks(Garden Party? Really?)
Fugazi onward - Arena-ready, tight progressive band. A chops monster on the kit.


Dan
 

Steech

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The most recent Drumhistory podcast on Bonham makes a very good case for how his sound was indeed very much a full 25% plus of the 4-part contribution that made Zep Zep.
That was a great podcast
 

Houndog

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I'm going to go with Ian Mosley of Marillion. The proof is in the sound. Just listen:
Script for a Jester's Tear - Prog rock bar band that got lucky. Loping, loose drum tracks(Garden Party? Really?)
Fugazi onward - Arena-ready, tight progressive band. A chops monster on the kit.


Dan
I love Fish era Marillion!!!!’
 

richardh253

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I think of this thread from the angle of "if you took the drummer out, could he/she be replaced and the group sound pretty much the same?"

Some drummers (Keith Moon, for example) and their signature drum sounds (John Densmore, for example)[and sometimes both] are so essential to the definitive sound.

So if not already in this thread, I'll add John Densmore, a very unique drummer with a very specific sound.
 

Steech

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I think of this thread from the angle of "if you took the drummer out, could he/she be replaced and the group sound pretty much the same?"

Some drummers (Keith Moon, for example) and their signature drum sounds (John Densmore, for example)[and sometimes both] are so essential to the definitive sound.

So if not already in this thread, I'll add John Densmore, a very unique drummer with a very specific sound.
Scroll up to some earlier posts where we discussed Densmore
 

Steech

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Can you find the clip please?
I like Densmore too. I have noticed he doesn’t hang with the drummers of his time, while everyone talks about drumming techniques they used 50 years ago and stuff, he’s very much into poetry.
Finally found the Keltner clip, starts at around 10:45 into it. After listening to it again I realized that Keltner wasn’t really trashing Densmore at all, he was praising him but said that Densmore had very little technique. I don’t know…some of his ride patterns and overall feel, that stuff is not easy to replicate, and some of it is done with technique, IMO.

 

Jazzhead

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Finally found the Keltner clip, starts at around 10:45 into it. After listening to it again I realized that Keltner wasn’t really trashing Densmore at all, he was praising him but said that Densmore had very little technique. I don’t know…some of his ride patterns and overall feel, that stuff is not easy to replicate, and some of it is done with technique, IMO.

Yea I don’t think he trashed Densmore, he just openly talks about what he (and many others) thinks of drummers like Ringo, Densmore, and Watts. He is probably friends with all of them and has talked with them about this topic openly, so he doesn’t care. All of those drummers have/had techniques, probably better than most of us but nothing near Keltner or Neil, but still they got really famous because their musical sensibility and style contributed so much to the success of their bands. Ringo himself said he can’t play the same fill two times in the same way, he just plays.
Trashing was Ginger’s thing lol he was like Bonham was a good drummer but nothing near my level LoL
 

Steech

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Yea I don’t think he trashed Densmore, he just openly talks about what he (and many others) thinks of drummers like Ringo, Densmore, and Watts. He is probably friends with all of them and has talked with them about this topic openly, so he doesn’t care. All of those drummers have/had techniques, probably better than most of us but nothing near Keltner or Neil, but still they got really famous because their musical sensibility and style contributed so much to the success of their bands. Ringo himself said he can’t play the same fill two times in the same way, he just plays.
Trashing was Ginger’s thing lol he was like Bonham was a good drummer but nothing near my level LoL
Yeah you’re right, that really was a Ginger thing to do, and he totally trashed Mitch Mitchell.
 

mattr

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Hmmm, Phil Collins eventually made Genesis into “his” sound. Pretty recognizable when he played on other peoples work too. If I understand the question correctly…
 


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