what happens to your collection when you don't plan an exit stratergy

Skins_in_the_game

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Saw this auction in OK near Tulsa. Heres the note about the estate.
This sale is for the estate of Ron as well as his parents Horace and Martha, who were lifetime residents of Muskogee. Music was Ron’s life and he loved all genres. He was instantly loved by all who met him. He was a founding board member of the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame and the curator for the museum since 2002. Many recordings were produced by Ron in his basement recording studio with his many extensive musical friends. Ron’s father was a professional photographer and operated radio stations. The beautiful antiques are a MUST SEE and many from the 1800s. The guitars are amazing along with the huge collection of studio equipment and musical instruments.

But the question I ask is if he helped found the Oklahoma Music HOF why is his stuff just going in an online auction? Seems he would have connections to all sorts of good people in the music business that could have lent a hand to help catalog and sell of his stuff.

So many drums and cymbals that could have been passed on to someone. But the real shame is the guitars. A lot of nice stuff that will sell for so much less than its worth.



here is the auction site

Note; They wont ship.
 
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JDA

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"Gretsch- That Great British Drum!"




I Searched "drum"..


Cymbal:
 
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Frank Godiva

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Your family does not love your stuff like you do. To them it's just more of your stuff which is why Camcos, black beauties, and other fine instruments end up at Goodwill

 

JDA

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"When you're dead it's the least of your worries"

Lu Chung Tao....1453

..and figure somehow someway it'll end up on ebay
or the internet like this stuff
 

campbellh

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Saw this auction in OK near Tulsa. Heres the note about the estate.
This sale is for the estate of Ron as well as his parents Horace and Martha, who were lifetime residents of Muskogee. Music was Ron’s life and he loved all genres. He was instantly loved by all who met him. He was a founding board member of the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame and the curator for the museum since 2002. Many recordings were produced by Ron in his basement recording studio with his many extensive musical friends. Ron’s father was a professional photographer and operated radio stations. The beautiful antiques are a MUST SEE and many from the 1800s. The guitars are amazing along with the huge collection of studio equipment and musical instruments.

But the question I ask is if he helped found the Oklahoma Music HOF why is his stuff just going in an online auction? Seems he would have connections to all sorts of good people in the music business that could have lent a hand to help catalog and sell of his stuff.

So many drums and cymbals that could have been passed on to someone. But the real shame is the guitars. A lot of nice stuff that will sell for so much less than its worth.

here is a couple of pics of one of the drums that is for sale. Most pics are really poor and don't show the badge but I saw a supra, and keystone acro, and gretsch, and even a Sonor designer 6.5 snare which ive seen listed for 800.
If you are in Tulsa you can probably pick up some Ks or old As and there are a couple of good sets and 4 or 5 nice snares.
Also if you need recording mics there are alot of those as well.

here is the auction site
Note; They wont ship.
The pics are awful! No side views...
 

Fullerton 9/72

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Then it is our responsibility to leave them a record - an detailed itemized list - of approximately how much each item is worth in today's dollars. Describe the rarity and popularity of the individual drum or set. Be realistic. Leave instructions on how and where to sell them. Give them a realistic market value that they could expect to sell them for, in a reasonable amount of time. Put a paper tag on each case, carefully describing exactly what each drum is - they're not going to know. At least, let your family benefit financially from your careful collecting choices, 'cause we can't take them with us ...
 

el_37

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Then it is our responsibility to leave them a record - an detailed itemized list - of approximately how much each item is worth in today's dollars. Describe the rarity and popularity of the individual drum or set. Be realistic. Leave instructions on how and where to sell them. Give them a realistic market value that they could expect to sell them for, in a reasonable amount of time. Put a paper tag on each case, carefully describing exactly what each drum is - they're not going to know. At least, let your family benefit financially from your careful collecting choices, 'cause we can't take them with us ...
I think you are leaving out something- the fact that nobody in your family gives a crap about selling your collection piece by piece.

It is annoying enough selling your own stuff piece by piece- could you imagine selling someone else’s?

The usual goal after someone drops dead (and the mourning period is over) is clearing out their stuff.

95% of the world will take a fraction of the value for dads junk- because selling dads house (or vacating it if it is a rental) is usually more important than waiting 4 years to get top dollar for dads Acrolite collection.

Nothing can prevent the “sudden death” collection liquidating scenario- but I do think anybody over 65 should start thinning the herd on all of their collections.

You have the most knowledge of your stuff and you won’t be sticking your family with the tedious responsibility of disposing of it.

Value is also a fluid concept. Just imagine making a value list in 2005 and now someone is trying to realize those prices in 2020.

That “$2000” 14x14 Rogers floor tom will be sitting around a long time......
 

HowardW

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I'm "lucky" in that two of my three kids are musicians (multiple instruments) and both play drums well. They're already jockeying to see who gets what set(s). Just to irritate them, I told them my will specified my drums and I were to have a Viking funeral together... they were NOT happy to hear it! :icon_lol:
 

thin shell

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There are a few gems in there but most of it looks quite dirty so there may be some hidden condition issues. The "recording studio" looks like it has some good stuff but is such a mess it's hard to tell whats what. If the price is right it would be worth getting but be prepared to spend a lot of time sorting it all out and finding out what works and what is broken. Everything in the auction looks like it has been sitting for a while so it would be a gamble to buy sight unseen.
 

KCDrumDad

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Only four hours away from me. I could convince myself that if I got several things it would make the trip worthwhile.
 

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