What is the reason you decided to be a drummer?

troutstudio

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JDA said:
Disliked early Guitar lessons.
Me too. I lost the top of two fingers on my left hand and it's never felt right. But it's my brother's fault I got into drums. He needed a drummer for his band and they had gigs!
 

kluger

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My buddy's all played string instruments, they needed a drummer, they said , "do you want to play drums?" I said "sure!"

that's where it started, 35 years ago.
 
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RickP

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It was a great excuse to stop Accordion lessons. God I hated the Accordion. I heard my Dad's LP a Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall and that was it for me, I was hooked !
 

troutstudio

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RickP said:
It was a great excuse to stop Accordion lessons. God I hated the Accordion. I heard my Dad's LP a Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall and that was it for me, I was hooked !
Benny Goodman - great reason to play!
 

JohnL

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My dad was a drummer and out of the blue one day asked if I would like to take lessons I said sure so here we are today about 50 years later still playing.
 

drummerdanva

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For me it was watching the Monkees TV show at about age 13. I would beat on the plastic lid of a coffee can with dowel rods while watching the show. My parents then got me lessons starting with the practice pad and rudiment books for about 9 months before getting a drum set. Then got into school band and went from there. I got more into jazz and big band jazz at that time so starting by watching the Monkees wasn't the hippest start but it is what it is. :happy11:
 

Atlantaskins

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Dave's not here, man !!
As a kid, every musical performance I saw, I always watched the drummer. From watching Puff-n-stuff that had the Bay City Rollers to staying up late to watch the midnight special with my older brother. The drummer always got my attention, I would "play" along. Still playing along.
 

homeby5

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Honestly.....it was the one instrument that I could learn quickly, without theory and lessons that I could play along with music. The other instruments would take WAY too long to at least be competent enough to gig.
 

& You Dont Stop

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The power of drums and my desire to move to them.

Its started with my mother. She was a fan of John Philip Sousa. So, my early memories of hearing music in the house was the American march playbook. The drum cadence really spoke to me. When I was about 5 or 6 Star Wars came out and we had the sound track at home. I would grab a milk crate, start the record on the hi-fi and stand on the crate and pretend to conduct the London symphony orchestra (you know, in case John Williams ever fell ill) So, long before my rock and roll years, music was very much something I responded to.

Fast forward to junior high. I played trumpet in the early bands (because my family owned a trumpet). During marching season I was in awe of how powerful the drums were during our indoor rehearsals. When we practiced on the field, I was playing close attention to the drums. In my 8th grade year (this would be in the mid 80s) I attended a Military Academy. As you can imagine, all the band played was American marches, by this time in my life I knew every note. It was a very traditional marching band (I was too young to be in it, these were high schoolers, maybe some jucos) the drum section was a line of snares, perhaps a tenor drum and often two equally pitched bass drums. My favorite thing about the drum section is that during the big final chorus of a march, the bass drummers would sling the mallets over the top in a crossover style. That was VERY cool to me. By the summer of '86, I was infected completely....I had to play drums.

My father found it in his heart to by me a drum kit in August of '86. I've been going deaf ever since.

I love the drums and their power to move you, either to march or dance.

there's no video here, but you can hear how good the marching band was six years before I attended
 
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pedro navahas

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Vistalite Black said:
My father was an anthropologist, and the travelled into the deepest jungles of the Amazon to work with the indigenous peoples there. These were tribes who had had absolutely no contact with the "civilized world." Of course, Dad brought us with him since he stayed with the Terena people for almost the whole year. After all, it took 17 days just to reach the village via floatplane, motorboat and then canoe. That's how far up the Jutai tributary they lived. In the evenings, with no TV or radio--or anything really after my Gameboy batteries died--we'd spend our nights as the Terena did--sitting by the fire, exchanging stories, sometimes singing and, of course, drumming.

Night after night, there'd be drum circles--sometimes related to religious rituals, sometimes just to pass the time and entertain our selves. Goat-skin drums, hollowed logs, handmade shakers, improvised percussion sticks from hardwoods... we used it all, and it all contributed to the rhythms that anywhere from 10 to 40 people could produce together. Sometimes, we'd drum for an hour or so, and sometimes it would be six or seven hours. As we drummed, the Terena women would dance enchantingly.

I never partook in the ayahuasca or hallucinogenic jasmine teas that set the Terena men and women completely out of their minds (because I was only 13 or 14 and my Mom wouldn't permit me to take as much as a toke of manaca). Yet, through the drumming alone--along with the fire, the dancing, the women--I also achieved transcendent states. Sometimes, it was like a trance, sometimes it was just an incredible feeling of well-being, but the drumming just make me feel high. On some nights, it was just an incredible out-of-body state that's hard to describe, except to say that very attractive Terena women would often try to lure me away from the fire (because they were so fascinated by blonde hair), but I enjoyed the drumming so much that I was sometimes a little bit reluctant to go with them, though I always did.

After four seasons in the jungle, my father's grant ran out, and the whole family had to return to the States. It seems weird, but as remote and primitive as the Terena village was--I was deeply homesick while living a somewhat privilieged suburban existence. My mother recognized this almost immediately, and when her book about the Terena was published and became a bit of a sensation in the academic world, she used the first check she got from the publisher to buy me a drum set. It was the late 70s, and she bought me exactly what I wanted, Ludwig Vistalites in black. I still have that set, and when I go down to my basement and play--along to the one cassette tape I was able to make of a Terena drum ritual before the recorder's battery wore out, I still am able to reach a state of transcendence without any drugs or alcohol whatsoever. My family thinks it's weird that I play wearing only my underwear--and that I don't play any rhythms they recognize--so I mostly play when they're not at home. In short, I drum because it connects me to the people who lived at one with the earth in a place that was very far away and very long ago.

You made this up!
 

forgiven7x

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My older brother influenced me. Later my nephew got into drums and before I know it I am into drums. Being a girl drummer or maybe I should say an OLD girl drummer.... shocks many people! I think I like that! Never judge a book by it's cover....

when I play my drums it is such a different feeling for me than when I play my piano or my keyboards(I have several). I feel better after I play my drums! seriously....kinda like after I have had my morning coffee......2 cups of coffee and I'm feelin' good!
 

pedro navahas

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There was always music in my life, my grandfathers family were musicians and he and my grandmother lived upstairs from us. As a little kid I can remember my grandfather playing harmonica with the old german guy on the front porch, who played concertina. Had a hand me down organ that I played and my grandfathers harmonica after he passed, then, as so many others, saw the Beatles on Ed Sullivan!!
 

Thumper

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Started playing trumpet in elementary school. In high school, there were lots of trumpets but the band was occasionally sparse in various sections, ended up playing Sousaphone for a while. One day, there were no percussionists, so that's where I went. Having direct responsibility for rhythm and tempo sort of resonated so that's where I stayed. My first time behind a kit was after school; the band director also had a "jazz" combo that needed a fill-in drummer - they were working on "Autumn Leaves" (i still remember the soulfulness of that song). From that day, i spent every after school minute in the practice room with that kit, my parents bought a cheap kit for me a couple years later. Abandoned drums during many years spent in career building, rekindled the fire when the church praise band needed some solid percussion. I have my own band now.
 

BennyK

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Ed Sullivan/Ringo matrix

The tousled elegance and animal magnetism in mastering a beat . The feeling of hitting them and the overall effect on everything around.

It goes deep , too cool for school , lone wolf," let the bad guys win every once in a while ... " Billy Preston
 

H.M.

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Like a lot of people it was seeing the BEATLES on Ed Sullivan. Several years later seeing Buddy Rich on Ed Sullivan also.
 

MrDrums2112

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I got to see Buddy Rich back in the late 70s, when I was in 2nd or 3rd grade. He came to my sister's high school, in NJ. I was hooked. Back then, JoeyBoom was my first drum teacher. Still playing today, and have become very inspired by the vintage scene.
 

TheBeachBoy

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I just loved the way the drums could alter the feel of a song and the driving groove, plus I thought "Hey, drums should be easy to learn; you just hit stuff." Of course, if drumming was easy, anybody could just sit down behind a kit and play.

There's also the thing I didn't think of when I started learning to play: hauling everything around and setting it up and tearing it down. Oh, how I envy the harmonica and bass players.
 

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