What is your unpopular drum opinion?

SpinaDude

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I never had a desire to play a drum solo. I used to love listening to them, especially the Phil Collins/ Chester Thompson duets (which I still find intriguing and musical) but most others tend to bore me. I usually respect them on some level, hopefully many levels, but they don't usually intrigue or inspire me.
 
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David M Scott

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I'm guessing your a rocker in an average highly amplified band. For Jazz Combos even with other instruments amped, 14in floor tom is more than enough in my 65 plus years of experience.
 

OZjazzer

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Jazz today is overrated. Much of today's "jazz" is hopelessly formulaic, with drummers playing in a typical and expected way. I put the blame for this squarely on Wynton Marsalis's shoulders, for homogenizing and standardizing jazz into a commercial entity.
Now that’s the best thing to have come out of this thread. So many of today’s smart young jazz drummers can play exactly like all the other smart young drummers. The guys who learned on the stand worked it out for themselves and all sounded completely different and instantly recognisable. Now???
 

ThomFloor

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I'm guessing your a rocker in an average highly amplified band. For Jazz Combos even with other instruments amped, 14in floor tom is more than enough in my 65 plus years of experience.
Whaa? Its supposed to be unpopular...get it?
 

bernard

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I'm guessing your a rocker in an average highly amplified band. For Jazz Combos even with other instruments amped, 14in floor tom is more than enough in my 65 plus years of experience.
No, no, I love 14" (and 15") toms, I was just trying to figure out the maths and the jump from 14/16 to 50 %. Still don't get it.
 

bernard

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Now that’s the best thing to have come out of this thread. So many of today’s smart young jazz drummers can play exactly like all the other smart young drummers. The guys who learned on the stand worked it out for themselves and all sounded completely different and instantly recognisable. Now???
Richard Spaven? Mark Guiliana? Nate Smith? (OK, not exactly "up and coming", but from a younger generation and instantly recognizable.)
 

Sprice

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Richard Spaven? Mark Guiliana? Nate Smith? (OK, not exactly "up and coming", but from a younger generation and instantly recognizable.)
I had to look up out Spaven. Man, that's nice.
It's always funny to me that people talk about how everything they like is super original and has feeling but everything else all sounds the same and is soul-less. They don't see the logical fallacy that obviously if we like something we'll listen more and be more familiar and learn the subtleties to where it all sounds different. If you only listen to a couple snippets from YouTube clips you're not going to get it. That's why there will never be much love on this forum for guys like Dobber Beverly, Chris Dave, or JD Beck because their respective genres "all sound the same."
 

ThomFloor

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No, no, I love 14" (and 15") toms, I was just trying to figure out the maths and the jump from 14/16 to 50 %. Still don't get it.
14 is 87.5% of 16....but the 'oomph' of a 14 is only about half (i.e. 50%) of a 16.
 

glaze148

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I hate conga playing on straight ahead jazz tunes. I love conga playing on Latin.
 

David M Scott

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Whaa? Its supposed to be unpopular...get it?
This Rocks!
Great, great stuff.
Whaa? Its supposed to be unpopular...get it?
No, no, I love 14" (and 15") toms, I was just trying to figure out the maths and the jump from 14/16 to 50 %. Still don't get it.
Well Math never was my strong suit but I did enjoy Physics. So, is there an equation that would explain the difference ? Really who cares. There has been several posts regarding the return of thin shells and i'm guessing that a thin shell 14in might equal the output of 16in thick shell of the same depth sound wise. Interesting huh ? One thing I did experience was that a Yamaha 14in floor tom made of crappy Luan didn't have the boom of my Poplar shell 14in Sonor, same depth.
 

OZjazzer

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Richard Spaven? Mark Guiliana? Nate Smith? (OK, not exactly "up and coming", but from a younger generation and instantly recognizable.)
Can I play the ‘exceptions to the rule’ card for a moment? Here in Australia the jazz factories (universities) are certainly turning out endless numbers of highly skilled clones who basically all sound alike. They study the same books, set up their Gretsch bop kits the same way, play trad grip, listen to the same solos etc etc. It’s a miracle that occasionally somebody slips through the cracks and actually sounds different. It’s the price we pay for having academia produced musicians rather than gig-made musicians. It’s probably a small price. Standards are much higher than they were, but I would still argue that originality has taken a big hit. And anyway there aren’t any gigs to learn your trade the hard way anyway.
 

Sprice

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Can I play the ‘exceptions to the rule’ card for a moment? Here in Australia the jazz factories (universities) are certainly turning out endless numbers of highly skilled clones who basically all sound alike. They study the same books, set up their Gretsch bop kits the same way, play trad grip, listen to the same solos etc etc. It’s a miracle that occasionally somebody slips through the cracks and actually sounds different. It’s the price we pay for having academia produced musicians rather than gig-made musicians. It’s probably a small price. Standards are much higher than they were, but I would still argue that originality has taken a big hit. And anyway there aren’t any gigs to learn your trade the hard way anyway.
But I'm not sure it's fair to judge the entirety of modern drummers against the best of the best classic jazz drummers. I expect there were tons of similar sounding drummers back in the day but "the exceptions to the rule" are who we now know from that period. They all learned from each and many went to music school on the GI bill after the war so there would be a lot of copying and similarities in playing. Most of the classic jazz recordings were made by maybe 20 or 30 drummers if that so I'm not sure why we'd knock the current generation of thousands upon thousands of drummers in the hundreds of jazz programs worldwide for not all being history makers.
 

dale w miller

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Now that’s the best thing to have come out of this thread. So many of today’s smart young jazz drummers can play exactly like all the other smart young drummers. The guys who learned on the stand worked it out for themselves and all sounded completely different and instantly recognisable. Now???
This is something I noticed while studying at Berklee. I found that 75% of the players sounded exactly alike. My punk rock ethos would not allow that to happen to me no. Hindsight I probably should not done so much so, but I found myself pushing more away than I was taking in because of it.
 

OZjazzer

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But I'm not sure it's fair to judge the entirety of modern drummers against the best of the best classic jazz drummers. I expect there were tons of similar sounding drummers back in the day but "the exceptions to the rule" are who we now know from that period. They all learned from each and many went to music school on the GI bill after the war so there would be a lot of copying and similarities in playing. Most of the classic jazz recordings were made by maybe 20 or 30 drummers if that so I'm not sure why we'd knock the current generation of thousands upon thousands of drummers in the hundreds of jazz programs worldwide for not all being history makers.
You’re missing the point. I’m not looking for history makers. All I’m suggesting is that when jazz became a university degree at hundreds, and now many hundreds of universities, it became much more interested in mass producing graduates to a certain standard and less interested in encouraging the odd-ball game changers.

That’s all I’m suggesting.
 


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