What is your unpopular drum opinion?

Tornado

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You’re missing the point. I’m not looking for history makers. All I’m suggesting is that when jazz became a university degree at hundreds, and now many hundreds of universities, it became much more interested in mass producing graduates to a certain standard and less interested in encouraging the odd-ball game changers.

That’s all I’m suggesting.
It's up to the graduate to change the game on their own after they get out of school. If they've gotten all they could out of school and have become highly competent players, they are that much ahead of the game. And if they are lucky, it only took them 4 years to get there. Now there's the issue of how to pay off all that student debt while trying to change the game playing jazz, but that's what rich parents are for.
 

Drumbumcrumb

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You’re missing the point. I’m not looking for history makers. All I’m suggesting is that when jazz became a university degree at hundreds, and now many hundreds of universities, it became much more interested in mass producing graduates to a certain standard and less interested in encouraging the odd-ball game changers.

That’s all I’m suggesting.
I feel you on this. It’s always struck me as ironic. Jazz is about SELF expression, not about perfecting a curriculum. Classical music is studied and perfected. Jazz is created. Sure, it’s essential to learn the components, the language, the history, but it’s supposed to be a new thing, your thing. Whenever I hear “you must use this tuning, this drum, these cymbals, you must play the ride like so, you shall insert bass drum there…” I’m like “that’s not what jazz is about, bro” Tune em the way you like, use what sounds good, make music. If jazz is new enough, it should be a little shocking, a little unfamiliar. Can you imagine say, a Count Basie hearing a Tony Williams? He’s gonna be flabbergasted, maybe a little outraged. It’s gonna shake him up. He might go into a whole classic old guy “that’s not music” rant. That’s fresh jazz, Pop! It’s supposed to be ahead of it’s time, that’s part of its je ne sais quoi.

I’m too old to know for sure, but I think there’s hope for the future of jazz drums. I watched an interview recently with a professor at a renowned music school and he was saying that the young people he teaches do NOT idolize the old school, they have no time for Buddy and Blakey, they want to make something new. That’s healthy. That’s what revolutionizes music, when the next generation has a healthy contempt for the music of their parents. Of course you’ve already internalized a lot of what you grew up on, so even the ‘new’ will have elements from the old. And that’s as it should be, there’s always some evolution in musical revolution! Luckily, there will always be those few who push against the grain and make their own way, and those are the ones who push the boundaries and move music forward.
 

Krys

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Playing to loops and clicks in live performance are crimes against humanity , like those trained circus bears riding bikes are against nature .
I disagree. Not every act is rich enough to hire 2 or 3 more musicians to perform on stage and prerecorded tracks very often enrich the audience experience. It's not always everything about the performer satisfaction or comfort.
 

jansara

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I’m too old to know for sure, but I think there’s hope for the future of jazz drums. I watched an interview recently with a professor at a renowned music school and he was saying that the young people he teaches do NOT idolize the old school, they have no time for Buddy and Blakey, they want to make something new. That’s healthy. That’s what revolutionizes music, when the next generation has a healthy contempt for the music of their parents.
You can't know "where it's at" unless you know where it's been.
 

bpaluzzi

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I disagree. Not every act is rich enough to hire 2 or 3 more musicians to perform on stage and prerecorded tracks very often enrich the audience experience. It's not always everything about the performer satisfaction or comfort.
The only people I've _ever_ heard complain about using a click were people who couldn't play to a click. Take that how you will. ;)
 

Ox Han

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Nobody needs more drums for different "voices". Kick, snare, little tom, big tom. That's all you need. You don't need more drums you just need to know when not to hit the damn things. To 99% of all people, when stripped down, drums are just obnoxious noise after 30 seconds.
 

bpaluzzi

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There are those who can't play without one .
I've never seen one of those.
To clarify: I've seen plenty of people who can't play in time with or without a click, but I've never seen someone who can really play with a click, but all of a sudden their time goes out the window when the click is off.
 

Drumbumcrumb

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The only people I've _ever_ heard complain about using a click were people who couldn't play to a click. Take that how you will. ;)
I don’t think it was a complaint about using the click as much as a denouncement of the clicks existence in live music. The bigger the act, the more the live version is “expected” to sound just like the studio version, enter the click. The cool thing about live music is hearing good musicians jamming and playing from the heart. Having fun even. I think (though I could well be wrong, it’s happened) OP was saying the click takes some of that heart out of a live performance.
 

Deafmoon

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People that think Neil Peart should always be #1 on every Greatest Rock Drummer list.
I know. Listen, I always felt he was perfect for Rush and I followed him for years in the 70’s and 80’s. I think Neil’s forte was really in orchestrating his parts. Even his solos were planned out. He did little, if anything, spontaneous. And that’s why the fans loved him. Because they heard Tom Sawyer and 2112 and By-Tor note for note for note every time they saw it done.
 

JimmySticks

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Caught him at Iridium a number of years ago, said it took his tech 4 hours to set that beast up. His work is impressive but that kit is too much.
Wow, 4 hours isn't bad! I would have thought a full days work to set-up that rig.
 

BobDrummer

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“You only need 4 drums.” That translates as “there’s only one way to play drums, My way.” That might even be true if there was only one style of music, but there are countless styles of music and countless ways to play drums. Besides, that argument goes both ways. You don’t need ONLY 4 drums, that’s a choice. You could choose more or you could even choose less. It’s also like the blues guitarist telling the prog guitarist “you only need 3 chords.” Or Bach saying that to Stravinsky. Different styles of music require different approaches to drumming. There is no “one size fits all” drum kit. That’s actually one of the wonderful things about music. There is literally something for everybody. What I like may not be what you like and vice versa. That’s OK! It’s an enormous musical world and there’s more than enough room at the table for all of us.

Sorry for the rant.
 


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