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What is your unpopular drum opinion?

Steve OnmywaytoLA

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Ok, a for real one. Drummers should not "feather the bass drum" playing jazz. It is an archaic relic from when upright bass players didn't commonly have amplification and the bass drum helped with volume. Given that all bassists now commonly use amps, we are just clouding the tone of a bass. Worse offense if it is a nice sounding upright. I don't care if you have a Canopus, Craviotto, or whatever... It's not going to sound as good as an $60,000 upright from the 1850's - or $5,000 bass from 2020 for that matter...
 

Mcjnic

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My unpopular opinion:

I feel like I’m in a math lecture when I watch Weckl play.

I saw Mike Portnoy quite a few years ago at a clinic. I sat close enough to put my feet on the front of his bass (one of ‘em anyway). The guy spent most of his time talking about the math breakdown of his licks within the tunes.
He‘s an entertaining drummer … but has a very boring approach to drums.
Seemed to me he had no soul to any of it ... just a bunch of mathematical breakdowns to demonstrate the subdivisions.
I liked the guy ok.
As ridiculously tough as it is for me to get my head around what Weckl is doing … he never felt like the Portnoy day in school to me.
But I can sure see how you could come away with that though.
 

Houndog

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I saw Mike Portnoy quite a few years ago at a clinic. I sat close enough to put my feet on the front of his bass (one of ‘em anyway). The guy spent most of his time talking about the math breakdown of his licks within the tunes.
He‘s an entertaining drummer … but has a very boring approach to drums.
Seemed to me he had no soul to any of it ... just a bunch of mathematical breakdowns to demonstrate the subdivisions.
I liked the guy ok.
As ridiculously tough as it is for me to get my head around what Weckl is doing … he never felt like the Portnoy day in school to me.
But I can sure see how you could come away with that though.
I was enthralled with Dream Theatre , but after a few years it got real old and repetitive and I felt like Portnoy was just playing his bag of tricks instead of serving the song …but then again all the songs did the same thing what was he supposed to do ??

As far as Weckyl goes , I just never liked any music that he was a part of ….
 

drums1225

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I saw Mike Portnoy quite a few years ago at a clinic. I sat close enough to put my feet on the front of his bass (one of ‘em anyway). The guy spent most of his time talking about the math breakdown of his licks within the tunes.
He‘s an entertaining drummer … but has a very boring approach to drums.
Seemed to me he had no soul to any of it ... just a bunch of mathematical breakdowns to demonstrate the subdivisions.
I liked the guy ok.
As ridiculously tough as it is for me to get my head around what Weckl is doing … he never felt like the Portnoy day in school to me.
But I can sure see how you could come away with that though.

I could have written this post myself. I became a big Dream Theater fan after first hearing the song "Ytse Jam" on WSOU (Seton Hall NJ college metal station) in like 1990 or so. Then, even more so, when "Images and Words" came out. A few years later, I saw Portnoy do a clinic at Sam Ash in White Plains, NY and came away with the exact feeling about his playing; contrived, mathematic, and pretentious. His 80's-era hand/foot combos ("quads", as many called them) had become boring and predictable, and DT's music began to sound almost silly to me. Impressive, but silly. I was done.

I still respect MP for creating an outlet for the type of playing I always wanted to do (Rush influenced, but heavier and more double bass oriented), and making an undeniable mark. I always thought Deen Castronovo was beyond him in the prog metal style, with Tony MacAlpine, Marty Friedman, and Cacophony.

I never did put together that prog metal band, and completely lost interest in that type of music/playing around the time of that clinic.
 

Houndog

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I’m not the Prog nut folks think .
I like
Kansas
Genesis
Rush
Porcupine Tree
Marillion
Jethro Tull to a degree …

Can’t think of any others Im a fan of ..

I don’t consider Pink Floyd Prog ..
 

thejohnlec

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I saw Mike Portnoy quite a few years ago at a clinic. I sat close enough to put my feet on the front of his bass (one of ‘em anyway). The guy spent most of his time talking about the math breakdown of his licks within the tunes.
He‘s an entertaining drummer … but has a very boring approach to drums.
Seemed to me he had no soul to any of it ... just a bunch of mathematical breakdowns to demonstrate the subdivisions.
I liked the guy ok.
As ridiculously tough as it is for me to get my head around what Weckl is doing … he never felt like the Portnoy day in school to me.
But I can sure see how you could come away with that though.
I do like and appreciate Weckl and have for many years. I just felt obliged to embrace and try to absorb what he did when I first heard him, but not necessarily inspired - I felt intimidated.

With Vinnie, I was instantly inspired and wanted to absorb it. He’s the great technician, but there’s so much soul in what he does that the intimidation was mitigated.

I’m certainly not on either of their levels, just outlining my visceral reactions to their approaches. Weckl’s contributions will be felt for decades (like Buddy), and rightfully so.
 

bigbonzo

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He hadn't noticed that the light had changed.
Apparently that's not how he lost it:

While trying to pass another car at a high speed, he lost control of his Corvette C4, which hit a dry stone wall and entered a field; his left arm was severed. Doctors initially reattached the arm, but the arm was later amputated due to an infection.
 

Mcjnic

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I do like and appreciate Weckl and have for many years. I just felt obliged to embrace and try to absorb what he did when I first heard him, but not necessarily inspired - I felt intimidated.

With Vinnie, I was instantly inspired and wanted to absorb it. He’s the great technician, but there’s so much soul in what he does that the intimidation was mitigated.

I’m certainly not on either of their levels, just outlining my visceral reactions to their approaches. Weckl’s contributions will be felt for decades (like Buddy), and rightfully so.

“intimidated” … excellent word choice.
Weckl intimidates the heck out of me.
The guy is supernatural.
I didn’t understand or appreciate Vinnie until much later.
Oddly enough I was listening to him long before I knew who he was.
He was the drummer on a Chris Christian album that I dug way back in the late 70s or early 80s.
It was several years later when I realized it was Vinnie.
Had no idea he was working the Christian Music studio scene back then.
Some great tracks there.
 

Rich K.

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Apparently that's not how he lost it:

While trying to pass another car at a high speed, he lost control of his Corvette C4, which hit a dry stone wall and entered a field; his left arm was severed. Doctors initially reattached the arm, but the arm was later amputated due to an infection.
It was actually a weird attempt at humor..."he blew his mind out in a car..."
 

trynberg

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I don't like the strong modern trend of thin midrange-y cymbals...to me, they don't "blend with the band", they just add a bunch of signal right on top of the other instruments. I much prefer the cymbals to ride on top of the rest of the instruments where they aren't in the way.
 


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