What Makes a Crash sound good?

EdenII

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Just bought my first acoustic kit and have already bought a k dark ride and k/dyno high hat pair. I bought the two because when I listened to recordings I really liked the tones they produces and how they fit into playing. But now when looking for a crash I'm closed. Previously I stayed away from the budget sets because their sounds weren't really appealing (pingy and washy) but when listening to crashes I can hear that the timbre might be different with the more expensive ones, but I don't see why crashes like the zbt or hcs are worse. What exactly should I be looking for in a crash? (I play a lot of fusion if that helps?)
 

multijd

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How you hit it is the biggest factor in how it sounds. Then how heavy it is but this is relative to how you hit it.
 

dustjacket

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Fullness. I like lush crashes that fade out just right.
 

lrod1707

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That's a hard question to answer. It's very subjective! It's whatever your ears like, the type of music you play, the size which will give a different pitch, etc.. Stick to quality cymbals which you've already started doing by choosing K's. Since you obviously like the K's since that's what you've bought, I'd start there. (Later on down the line you can start mixing and matching brands and models when your ears figure out what mixes and what doesn't). For now listen to sound files in different K styles and sizes and you will end up knowing what you like just like you knew about the ride & hi-hats that you selected. Size wise, I'd start with an 18 and/or a 16! Those are not to small and not to big and they cover all the bases and have a nice spread in sound between the two. Good luck!
LRod
 
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JDA

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When you put it down on the floor, make the plans to sell it, replace buy and put up a smaller (than the other side) ride

Crash cymbals are best thought of as an unnecessary item
you can hit any cymbal for an accent
Your rides are where everything is coming from

crash specific cymbals are groove-knockers good for the last note ending and about it
otherwise you can hit any cymbal (ride) for an accent

you need the rides you don't need the crashes
crashes interrupt the groove
and provide no groove

they don't flow
they "end"

Sometimes they "begin" but mostly
they're useless wasted Space

of which is limited

If you want/insist on an effects cymbal consider
a splash, a swish, or one of the O-zone type cymbals
 
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jaymandude

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Just bought my first acoustic kit and have already bought a k dark ride and k/dyno high hat pair. I bought the two because when I listened to recordings I really liked the tones they produces and how they fit into playing. But now when looking for a crash I'm closed. Previously I stayed away from the budget sets because their sounds weren't really appealing (pingy and washy) but when listening to crashes I can hear that the timbre might be different with the more expensive ones, but I don't see why crashes like the zbt or hcs are worse. What exactly should I be looking for in a crash? (I play a lot of fusion if that helps?)
That's an interesting question. Like everything, it depends on a few things.

Most people " hear" the attack, the point at which the stick hits the cymbal. I suppose that defines the sound. And maybe there's not that much of a difference to you between the lower lines and the others in terms of that. But the more expensive cymbals will likely have a wider range of frequencies, those would be apparent in the sound right after the attack. The " width" of the sound, how wide or narrow the frequencies are. Those wider ( or narrower) frequencies can allso be apparent in the music, when you go to record, or when you hear a band play live. It's what can make a cymbal sound FULL or TINNY

We could also get into the feel of cymbals, and sizes. But i need more coffee for that..
 

lrod1707

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Crash cymbals are best thought of as an unnecessary item
you can hit any cymbal for an accent
Your rides are where everything is coming from
you need the rides you don't need the crashes
crashes interrupt the groove
and provide no groove

they don't flow
they "end"

Sometimes they "begin" but mostly
they're useless wasted Space
Not trying to step on your toes Joe but maybe for pure Jazz this can apply but not for all types of music. OP says he plays fusion but I'm sure it's not the only thing he will be playing. So he probably needs at least one crash. If you are playing rock for example, crashes are most definitely a necessity. I don't think this can be generalized. I can't imagine what it would have been like if Neil Peart would have only used a ride!
 

jaymandude

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Not trying to step on your toes Joe but maybe for pure Jazz this can apply but not for all types of music. If you are playing rock for example, crashes are most definitely a necessity. I don't think this can be generalized. I can't imagine what it would have been like if Neil Peart would have only used a ride!
MAybe he should have ? JOKING !!!!!
 

hardbat

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Record your group using various cymbals, and see what sounds you like out front. It's hard to tell what it will sound like in a group when you're right on top of it.
 

JDA

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GET AN OZONE-Type
Show the OP what they look like..
 

JDA

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a singular crash is basically an effex item

Show the OP some O-Zone Types...
 

JDA

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You really want that don't you? Someday!
Look. I'm not teaching 2nd grade today ok? : )

Just bought my first acoustic kit and have already bought a k dark ride and k/dyno high hat pair. I bought the two because when I listened to recordings I really liked the tones they produces and how they fit into playing. But now when looking for a crash I'm closed. Previously I stayed away from the budget sets because their sounds weren't really appealing (pingy and washy) but when listening to crashes I can hear that the timbre might be different with the more expensive ones, but I don't see why crashes like the zbt or hcs are worse. What exactly should I be looking for in a crash? (I play a lot of fusion if that helps?)
$0.01


$36

Want a "crash" you can Ride so as you don't take up the entire living room
or use an effex
 
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Beefsurgeon

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I think the main goal with choosing cymbals is that they should:
1) Sound good with each other
2) Sound good with the music you play

What you don't want is a cymbal that sticks out like a sore thumb. We've all seen drummers play where it sounds good except every time he hits THAT f'in thing. Maybe we've even been that drummer (who, me?).

It can be difficult to assess how a cymbal will fit into your sound from online demos. A cymbal might sound nice in the video, but in the context of your kit it could sound way too loud/quiet/harsh/dark/bright/weird.

The safest bet is to get a crash that's in the same "family" as your ride or hats. Outside of that, a neutral med-thin crash should also blend well with your cymbals and would definitely be suitable for fusion. Moving into budget and esoteric choices is more of a gamble--you may find an unusual combination that works perfectly, but this is difficult without the experience of owning and playing different cymbals for long enough to develop a sense of the specific qualities you're looking for.
 


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