What Makes A Snare Drum Good?

rondrums51

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Another factor is room acoustics. I had a Fibes fiberglass snare that sounded great to my ears in a lot of situations, but in rooms with really ringy acoustics, it sounded too harsh and sharp.
That's why I finally settled on the Ludwig 402. The aluminum shell has a warmer sound than brass or fiberglass. It sounds great in all acoustic situations, with a bit of tweaking.
 

JDA

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I don't think he's looking for brand names; more...a relationship, with a right drum (no joke

First of all get your hands together then you can look at cars on the used car lot with more confidence. If you're worrying about micro-mills..we gotta get some playing chops together
 

Tigerdrummer

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Sensitivity for me ( though I am a newbie & only play at home). You want a loud crack when you want it and you want a quiet sound when you dont. It isnt just the wires. its how it responds to give you different dynamics
 

bigbeat

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"It's when you drop your hand the (perfect) rimshot is Right there"


so it's a feel connection in addition to tone & sustain & those things..
"It's the one' that gives you the most perfect rimshot with the least effort..

It just " squares-up" with your arm, hand, wrist, comfort-angle- position of attack"...effortlessly.
That's the one. It's the one you always come back to.
You don't want any "trouble" between you and the connection to the drum. None. whatsoever.
Your criteria, while I understand what you mean, has a lot to do with positioning the snare at the right height and angle, and the height of the throne, rather than the snare itself.
 

RickPlaysDrums

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^^^

Not to sound egotistical, but if you know how to select proper heads, and maybe certain wires, know how to tune and know how to play, you could make junk sound good. I mean, really, how complicated is it?

I believe that's what Obiwandrumobe is saying.

As long as there's no structural problems (out-of-round, de-lamination, bad or damaged bearing edges, bent hoops, hardware: e.g. strainers, lugs, casings).

Although the drum may only have one sweet spot where it wants to live, not two, three, or even four. So be it.
 
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AtlantaDrumGuy

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I don’t believe in “the one.” Good to have a few different on hand. I never keep up with little details on the build out...I just know a good snare when I play it!

But if I were to pick only one...I’d concentrate on one with a wide tuning range.
 

CAMDRUMS

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If it sounds good the first time you hit it, without messing with the heads, tuning, muffling.
 

Rock Salad

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Right on.
I think I agree with you guys. Sensitivity is iffy with the more in my budget snares . That's why i love that Yamaha one. It was cool to google:
"What makes a snare drum good", and get back- (pic.)
My collection is those two, the meh Mapex and the rockin Yamaha.
Screenshot_20190519-005034_Chrome.jpg
 

bkny110

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Only snare I regret selling was my Slingerland vintage artist solid maple. I find I’m now getting through life with 4 snares. A vintage 402, 6.5 black beauty, 5.5 & 6.5 craviotto’s Birds-Eye maple.
Sounds like you're have a difficult life with just those four snares. :icon_mrgreen: :laughing6:
 

multijd

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“What makes a snare drum good?”
As in, “That’s a good snare drum”? The sound of it? Its versatility?
I have a variety of snare drums. Some are better for some types of playing, styles of music, rooms, miked or acoustic than the others. They are all good snares though. They are built well and tune well.

It sounds from your description that you have a certain kind of sound in mind. Is that a “good sound” for the music you play? What is guiding your sound preference? This is a good place to start. You might get ideas from recordings or listening to drums/drummers live. The best way is to listen to your drums in context and see if they fulfill what you want to hear. Do they make you want to play the way you envision? Are they inspiring? Do the drums make it easy for you to get the sound in your head?

To me what makes a snare drum good begins with the quality of the drum itself. Quality shell, hardware, good edges and sturdy rims are important. I have both die cast and stamped rims, steel and brass, chrome and nickel, all “good”. I prefer heavier rather than lighter rims. I have thicker shell wood drums and those with re-rings, maple and mahogany, aluminum and bronze, even steel. All good. I tend to prefer wood but will use metal in certain situations. I have 8, 10 and 12 lug drums. All good. I’m not a fan of six lug drums. Ive used Remo Ambassadors for years, some Evans heads, occassional Aquarian, calf and recently Kentville Kangaroo. All good. Different sounds for different situations.

So “good” starts to become a combination of preferences for certain “sounds” and the ability of the drum to hone in on that sound through various construction features, head choice and tuning. I don't think anyone here can tell you what is a “good snare drum” for you! But if you investigate the parameters of sound-affecting choices in a variety of drums I’m sure you’ll find that out for yourself.

Good luck!
 
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Bonzo442

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Sounds like you're have a difficult life with just those four snares. :icon_mrgreen: :laughing6:
I was thinking the same thing poor me! I guess I really didn’t answer the question either but so many things make a snare great but a lot depends on the sound you’re going for. Any snare can be tweaked to give so many combinations of sounds and that’s why I feel 2 metal and 2 wood snares should cover so much ground I wouldn’t need more than that and so far I’ve been happy. Now cymbals are a whole other animal
 

High on Stress

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How about when you say to yourself, “I love the way this snare sounds” then realize that one of the tension rods is completely loose.
This happens to me a lot. The rod near the rimshot area completely detunes and the drum is sounding great. I check tuning and bring the tension tod back up and now the drum sounds off to me.
 

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