What player do you think is most similar to Buddy that is still active these days

drumtimejohn

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As far as style of play I think of Buddy every time I hear Steve Maxwell play. Also, let’s not forget Steve Smith played with the Buddy Rich Orchestra. He fit the part real well when I saw them.
 

foxy_shazamtastic

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Buddy commanded the kit and the band. He literally drove and propelled the band with an energy and enthusiasm, as well as precision that really is not the place of drummers in today's bands anymore, to the degree that Buddy and other big band drummers had in their day. Today's players certainly put out the energy and many players can do what Buddy did at a drum set. Can anybody play as fast as Ronald Bruner Jr. or Gergo Borlai or Damien Schmitt and others of their class? Until Billy Cobham came along, Buddy knew he could take on the world. Billy shrunk that world so much Buddy told Ed Shaughnessy not to play any of that East Indian s--t when they did their duel on the Carson show. That was a direct comment on Billy's work with Mahavishnu and the drumming world and the rudiments he employed at blazing speeds back then.

Buddy was probably the first, international player to easily qualify as the guy that created "cloning," which he hated. Before Baker and Bonham, et al, Buddy had clones dripping down the walls. Butch Miles comes to mind. Possibly the most well known modern BB drummer that was saturated with Buddy's influence, as far as playing style.

Tommy Igoe, Jimmy Ford were mentioned. Steve Smith is certainly a master of the instrument, as well as Dave Weckl. They are both more laid back than Buddy, though. Buddy was a force of nature. His over the top personality went into his playing and that kind of inner conviction of how well one does what they do, is not really something that can be pulled off like Buddy did without coming across as severely arrogant. Buddy's constant humor and obvious love for Jazz tempered his hubris, despite how overbearing he could be. His confidence cascaded like an enormous waterfall that drenched his band every single night. His humor and talent kept it all from being "the Buddy Rich show," though. His music was filled with constant solos from every member of the band and he encouraged the highest level of playing from them. He demanded it, and they gave it to him.

I do not believe that type of player really exists anymore. It's just a different day and age. "One of a kind" is really something that can be placed next to Buddy's name.
Is Ronald not in control of this band? Y’all I’m gonna keep tryin
 

REF

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Is Ronald not in control of this band? Y’all I’m gonna keep tryin
Is he in control of the band? Buddy didn't control anything but, the time. He had a commanding presence in his band. He propelled things in a very individual, stylistic way.

Speed is part of Ronald's inner being. His approach to the instrument ... I think his place in a band is better represented in his work with George Duke's band; a larger ensemble where it more closely approaches Buddy's setting, and in that setting I would not say Ronald has the same presence and command as Buddy in his band. But, these things are subjective. Ronald is a monster player. He would have smoked Buddy in a drum battle when Buddy was in his prime. Ronald is just everywhere in an instant. You blink your eyes and he has already struck everything on his big set. Two very different styles. I think style was part of the OP's question.
 

shuffle

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There's really no viable big band scene to speak of anymore, so looking for a Buddy clone there is a dead end, IMO. But if you're talking about seeing a drummer that really has it all together and is also entertaining, I'd recommend seeing Steve Smith when he plays with Vital Information. I saw both Steve with VI and Steve Gadd with Chick Corea within a few weeks of each other in a local jazz club about a year or two ago, and honestly I enjoyed Smith a lot more than Gadd. Steve Smith seemed a lot more into the music and was visibly enjoying himself and the music tremendously, and that always translates to an audience.
Hate to say it but Gadd looks like hes constipated when he plays.
 

EvEnStEvEn

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I feel REFs post about Buddy really nailed it well. There'll never be another Buddy.



Of course there's several players that are quite good at replicating BRs playing style:

Butch Miles
Joe Osborne Jr.
Dick Cully
Jimmy Ford
...and many others
 

Rick

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There's really no viable big band scene to speak of anymore, so looking for a Buddy clone there is a dead end, IMO. But if you're talking about seeing a drummer that really has it all together and is also entertaining, I'd recommend seeing Steve Smith when he plays with Vital Information. I saw both Steve with VI and Steve Gadd with Chick Corea within a few weeks of each other in a local jazz club about a year or two ago, and honestly I enjoyed Smith a lot more than Gadd. Steve Smith seemed a lot more into the music and was visibly enjoying himself and the music tremendously, and that always translates to an audience.
I'll second Steve Smith. I mean, nobody replaces Buddy. But I saw Steve play back in August with the house band at Drum Fantasy Camp in Chicago. After seeing the way he drove that band and his solo work, I'd say he's the only drummer I've seen live where the thought crossed my mind that he was comparable to Buddy.
 

piccupstix

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Another Weckl mention. I thought he did a great job with the Buddy Rich Band back about 3 years ago...and still was Weckl, know what I mean.
 

jansara

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Ronald is a monster player. He would have smoked Buddy in a drum battle when Buddy was in his prime.
Bruner's good. He doesn't say anything that hasn't been said a million times before.

Have you seen Buddy in his prime? I have. Not the 80's Rich - - the 60's and 70's Rich.
Let's keep it real. He would have eaten Bruner alive, for a snack.
 
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singleordoubleheads

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What about Carl Palmer? A unapologetic deciple of BR back in the day and often referred to as "the BR of Rock". He is still out there playing his azz off at about the same age Buddy was just before he fell ill.
 

REF

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Bruner's good. He doesn't say anything that hasn't been said a million times before.

Have you seen Buddy in his prime? I have. Not the 80's Rich - - the 60's and 70's Rich.
Let's keep it real. He would have eaten Bruner alive, for a snack.
Yes, I've seen just about every video of Buddy in his prime. I do not believe Buddy had that same single stroke or explosive speed and power Bruner or some others have, nor that Cobham had in his prime, either. That is just a matter of speed, though. I'm not speaking of technique all around. Buddy had facility that most players do not have. That said, so many have studied and achieved Buddy's playing level all you can say is Buddy was original in these aspects of technique. That can longer include Jazz, in general or especially Big Band work because of how it has faded but, strictly speaking to drum technique, youtube is filled with players doing stuff Buddy did. I can't think of their names but, I have seen players on YT that are so fast all you see, literally, are blurs of motion. One kid was so fast comments were knocking him that he was using some kind of trick photography so, he set up a gong from his school behind him, pushed it, and played so you could see his speed as the gong slowed down swinging back and forth. The kid was moving in jaw dropping speed.

As much of an influence that Buddy was for me, he had limitations, like all humans do. He excelled at everything, to be sure. His life at the set is not isolated, though. You tube shows that. I have never seen anyone command and drive a band and the music like him. Never really seen anyone with such control or at least, making his technique and control look so easy but, everything he did has been copied by others.
 

Houndog

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I totally don’t get the Buddy is the greatest ever and ever will be line .
So many players out there in my opinion are better .
 

Rick

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I saw Buddy perform live (with his band) twice. 1978 and 1980. Killer band! And, as much as I love many of today's great drummers, I've never seen anyone that could drive a band, groove his rear end off, and play jaw dropping, high energy drum solos like Buddy.
 

Rick

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I love this video of Buddy. Not his most impressive drum solo work ever (although it's plenty good... and check out that left hand in one particular spot!) but I think this is a great example of how he could swing his butt off. And he clearly had the greatest respect and admiration for Mel Torme. As difficult as Buddy could be to work with, you can tell he's absolutely having a blast playing with Mel!

 

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