What seemingly easy song/part did you surprizingly struggle with?

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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Immigrant Song.

I understand the groove, so don’t transcribe it and tell me it’s easy. I cannot play it. And then, out of nowhere, for 48 seconds, I can play it perfectly. Then it is gone. Almost a mental AND physical block. My foot is locked in ice and snow.
Valhalla, I am not coming.
This is what I think of that dang song:

The original was so much better:
Dude! Warn us before dropping something like this chicken thing... I laughed so hard snot flew out my nose...
 

Ludwigboy

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I did slow it down to .25. Unmitigated mess.
I sped it up to .5, then I could make out what was going on.
I still hear a 16th note ride pattern, but jOe explained that its considered triplets, even if they're not demarcated as such on the recording (in other words, there's no accented beginning or end to the triplet).
Man, this theory thing....sometimes, I think it should come with a bottle of aspirin. :banghead:
It is difficult to discern but I hear triplets...one-and-ah, two-and-ah....I think because he is playing so quick , it may be misleading....I think of the song "The Stroll" by The Diamonds...same triplets but the tempo is slow and the snare is on two and 4-and. Hope this helps a little
 

BennyK

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The outcome of this song may have been unintended , one of those happy accidents between musicians with a barely discernable interpretation , Chuck Berry knew this and used it to great advantage . Coincidentally(?) Billy Swan lived in that 50's rock n roll pocket. In my experience ,the fine line disappears when the down beat on the snare happens by itself unaccompanied by a note on the hihat , giving it a natural push . Listen to how the other members of the band are playing . Sometimes implication can be so strong it doesn't need to actually be executed .

Scottish rudimental drummers may be playing the exact same piece as a North Americans, but there is a difference and that difference can change the resulting complexion for example.

... rhythmn guitar upstroke can create the necessary tension profiled in repetitive triplets .

 
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RayB

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The outcome of this song may have been unintended , one of those happy accidents between musicians with a barely discernable interpretation , Chuck Berry knew this and used it to great advantage . Coincidentally(?) Billy Swan live in that 50's rock n roll pocket. In my experience the fine line disappears when the down beat on the snare happens by itself unaccompanied by a note on the hihat , giving it a natural push . Listen to how the other members of the band are playing . Sometimes implication can be so strong it doesn't need to actually be executed .

Scottish rudimental drummers may be playing the exact same piece as a North Americans, but there is a difference and that difference can change the resulting complexion for example.

... rhythmn guitar upstroke can create the necessary tension profiled in repetitive triplets .

Wow, "It's All Right" has fantastic drumming! I think lots of drummers today would have trouble playing like this. Not because they can't figure out what he's playing; but because they would play it so precisely and staccato that it wouldn't flow like this. I don"t mean to say, "we wuz better in the old days". Styles change, the way we hear music changes. I've heard very well-known contemporary drummers attempt to play Baby Dodds press roll drumming. Terrible; they produce a sing-song boom chick beat that's a parody of the fantastic groove he created. On the other hand, can you picture Baby playing "Stairway to Heaven"?
I believe there's so much to gain by digging all the variations of the ride, shuffle and 12/8 grooves at all tempos.There's so many musical possibilities to explore based on the triplet figure. Opens up your ears. The strict rudimental triplet will loosen up when you hear more and more triplet-based grooves. It will add so much to your drumming now; it's a lot more than a retro style
 

Rich K.

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No joking around. I've heard the same thing since 1975. It sounds like straight 16th's to me.
I hear NO triplets. That's why I was wondering about the hand claps.
It dawned on me that they might be throwing you off, because if you hear those as part of the hat pattern, then it WOULD seem like triplets. :dontknow:
Don't mean to be rude, but do you know what 16ths are?
 

stuart s

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Zeps All of my Love

the bb b bbs bb b bbs ....transitions seem easy but its hard for me with eights on the hhts, my right foot trips, if I play single handed 16ths on the hats, my foot can play it just fine, but it does not sound right as Bonzos doing only 8th on the hats.
 

Fibes

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My 12 y/o daughter learned Ballroom blitz on bass and I want to play it with her. "Piece of cake!" I thought to myself... But I'm struggling with the snare accents over the swing BD pattern in the opening riff.

I can play the snare part A-1 if I just keep a steady boom-chick under it. But the second I put that simple kick variation in there, it unravels. Conversely, if I play the correct BD line and keep the train beat un-accented, it goes fine too. Been at it for a good hour now and it's coming along but still very much shaky.

This is kind of embarassing, I didn't expect to struggle that much on something that basic. Lately, I've been fueled by a false sense of confidence after easily nailing a bit of more advanced material.

I guess at times like these, the limitations of dis-organised self teaching really highlight the (many) holes in my learning process and foundationnal independence.

So, any of you fine folks have stories of fumbling on some basic stuff?


Present butt kicking I am getting:

Just started working out of a Chuck Silverman book named Practical Applications Afro-Caribbean Rhythms for the Drumset. This is an incredibly excellent, authentic book. The very first page you work on is the Cha Cha Cha. You know, the outdated dance step that peaked in the early 50's? Must be the simplest thing, 10 minutes tops and move on to Mambo. Chucks version of "drumset only" meaning zero other percussion players, is brutal. You start playing the guiro part on the high hat, using the left hand. By itself, not terrible, but takes a bit of work on it's own because the left foot is open on 1, closed on the "and of one," closed on 2, & the "and of 2," open on 3, closed on the "and of 3," closed on 4 & the "and of 4." So like a guiro:

O+ ++ 0+ ++ where 0 = open, + =closed, count under it.
1+ 2+ 3+ 4+

Again, doesn't look hard, but this is played with the left hand. Took me 2 weeks to get close to playing it up to a song length, just this part.

Next, the bass drum plays the the "And of 2." Some books instruct to also play the bass drum on 4. Seems like the more it's evolved into modern day jazz, the 4 is dropped.

Next add the right hand playing quarter notes on a high pitched cha cha bell.

Finally, the left hand moves from high hat to small tom on 2, and again on 4 .

I'm also learning it using "heel down" with both feet, first time for me, and that's a big tough change.

My right hand playing 1/4 notes on the cha cha bell keeps wanting to play the hi hat part...

So for something that I expected to blow through in less than 10 minutes, I'm into my 3rd week.

But it's starting to sound good, and then when you learn a looser version of it in other books, it's a breeze. (relief actually.)

But it sounds incredibly authentic, and the closest you can come to sounding like a full set of conga player, bongo bell, conga and guiro.

I hope the rest of the book gets a little easier.

Back when I was studying jazz with some fine instructors, I did a bunch of stuff and expect to run into it in this book, but the goal is to

form a little standards trio/quartet, but I want to really be able to nail a bunch of Afro-Cuban and Brazilian stuff so that I'm not driving the crowd out after the 3rd

"ding-a-ding" song in a row.
 
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Russian Dragon

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Fascinating thread. I've been fooled by several songs. For me, it's my dumb brain 'composing' incorrectly that gets me into trouble. Most often it's a sparse rhythm in an intro that doesn't start on 1, but there's no frame of reference until a few bars later, when my dumb brain has 'placed' the downbeat in the wrong place. When the real downbeat is revealed, it's a shock. There's an XTC song (that I can't recall the title of, or find, sorry) that starts with a syncopated guitar part. My brain places the downbeat in the same wrong place every time, and I have to do the same jarring recalibration once the real downbeat is revealed. Sneaky buggers, those XTC guys.

Even something as mundane as The Eagles hit Take It Easy has caused onstage trainwrecks in pick-up groups. The guitar intro's accents are syncopated (on the &'s), but soooooo many guitar players don't seem to know this, and play it as if the accent is on 1. Predictable, comical results when the rest of the band enters.
 

jptrickster

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Fascinating thread.

Even something as mundane as The Eagles hit Take It Easy has caused onstage trainwrecks in pick-up groups. The guitar intro's accents are syncopated (on the &'s), but soooooo many guitar players don't seem to know this, and play it as if the accent is on 1. Predictable, comical results when the rest of the band enters.
I struggled with this as you mentioned no reference to the one and if the guitarist doesn’t count it in its hard to know( and he didn’t have a clue either!)
I found this online when I was learning it. Ah its all so Easy now
 

debotcher

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Badge by Cream. Coming in on time after the short guitar break going into the change. I just CAN NOT count that thing. I just don't know why. Must be some kind of mental brick wall.
 

BennyK

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Badge by Cream. Coming in on time after the short guitar break going into the change. I just CAN NOT count that thing. I just don't know why. Must be some kind of mental brick wall.
I watched and counted the " D" chords that were being played . The seventh one meant I bring them back in with an in- time paradiddle . I can't remember for sure, but I believe it's the top of the chord .
 
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richardh253

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Dude! Warn us before dropping something like this chicken thing... I laughed so hard snot flew out my nose...
Sung "Buy" a chicken? How about Sung BY a Chicken? Or was the chicken bought & executed after this offering? Gives new meaning to feathering the bass drum.
 

old_K_ride

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The opening of Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me and My Monkey, at the transition from the riff into the first vocal line.
I got it right eventually and now probably couldn't do it again if my life depended on it.
I think that was a tape edit...years ago I posted a thread here about that song...someone broke it down "time wise"...there's no way The Fabs wrote it that way...it was an edit.
similarly is the break during "I Shot the Sheriff"...you can't count time during it...Jamie Oldaker revealed even HE couldn't count that because it was an edit.
 

MrYikes

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An old 60s tune called JEAN in 3/4. I just couldn't decide what to put in and what to leave out. We played it three times the first night and since no one danced to it we never played it again. But I never forgot it.
 

Core Creek

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Fire is the first that came to mind.... I learned it when I was 15 for a band and never quite got it right, and now muscle memory takes over and screws that one up for me....

My biggest hurtle was Pat Benatar’s Heartbreaker at 1:45. I needed to learn it for a rehearsal the next day and it was just so odd to my ear... so I just found an online transcription and worked through it for ten minutes. Once I got it it made sense, but on its own it’s quite odd....

 
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Russian Dragon

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Wake Up is the XTC song I was trying to find. They think they're so clever, starting on the and of one and screwing my head up each. and. every. time., heh. It's not complicated, but my ears don't expect the clave to start mid-bar without a reference to 1.
 
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