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What was the single most thing that improved your drumming?

Ryukyu

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The biggest thing that helped me was simply taking private lessons with a really good teacher.
 
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Stephen.DeBoard

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Curious...how did she do that?
It was pretty simple really. She liked to dance! She was also an artist with some experience as a bass player before we met. I never heard her play. At that time in my life I was still focused on chops over feel. I think she sensed that while she thought I could play that from a listener’s perspective I was not focusing enough on the main point of being a drummer in a band. It takes a conscious effort and discipline to get people to move to your beat. I started realizing how playing behind, on or ahead of the beat affects the music.
 

notINtheband

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D2355CA2-583B-48D2-AB09-0A4E65D65248.jpeg
Haven’t broken this out in a couple years. Long overdue.
Spending this Christmas morning sharpening the sword.
 

DBT

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My Teacher who in turn had my mother buy me Stick Control , a Metronome , a pair of Regal Tip 7a’s and a Metal hoop Remo practice pad . A lot to embrace as a 6 year old . First words out of his mouth after that “ Let’s begin “ , then a whole lot of do it again .
 

Houndog

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Lessons , gigs , listening, practicing.
I couldn’t pin it down to one thing ….
 

Houndog

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This was going to be my reply as well. Recording and reviewing my practice time can feel a bit like navel gazing, but it really helps to scrutinize what I'm doing outside of the moment I'm doing it. A bit more detachment and objectivity.

I'd also add that my band records all of our rehearsals and performances, and listening back to those has really helped with both improving my technique and internalizing and understanding the material. I tend to be my own worst critic and scrutinize the imperfections, but it's helped me improve faster than at any other point in my drumming development.
I need to do this more ….

Suppose to get a board recording of last show next week , I feel like I played better than ever ..looking forward to hearing it .
 

jptrickster

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I just can’t do that ….never have ….
Good for you ….
I just can’t do that ….never have ….
Good for you ….
I used to do stuff like see how long I could double stroke roll, 20 min half hour an hour! Get into a good solo for 2o min- half hour … used to practice like this everyday. Now, not so much. I’m semi retired coasting on muscle memory lol
 

James Walker

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When I was 14 or 15, hearing Steve Gadd in concert with Chuck Mangione's band, playing his quarter note shuffle - quarter notes, unison, all four limbs, nothing else - for a chorus of a blues, and in the process swing the hell out of the band and raise the energy in the room exponentially. Made me realize that the ability to play fast and complex wasn't the most important thing for a drummer.
 

GiveMeYourSmallestSticks!

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I need to do this more ….

Suppose to get a board recording of last show next week , I feel like I played better than ever ..looking forward to hearing it .
It's a great tool, and sometimes funny how it can reveal discrepancies between how you felt in the moment and the actual quality of the performance. I had a performance in a club with a really wonky backline kit recently. It made my playing feel a bit stifled and hesitant in the moment, and I was less willing to take risks or try to pull off faster/trickier stuff because the kit felt so foreign. I didn't come away from that performance feeling great about it, but listening back it's actually one of our best performances as a band. Sometimes your own thinking and hang-ups in the moment can cloud your judgement. Reviewing recordings really helps to get beyond this perceptional obstacle, I highly recommend it.
 

Houndog

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It's a great tool, and sometimes funny how it can reveal discrepancies between how you felt in the moment and the actual quality of the performance. I had a performance in a club with a really wonky backline kit recently. It made my playing feel a bit stifled and hesitant in the moment, and I was less willing to take risks or try to pull off faster/trickier stuff because the kit felt so foreign. I didn't come away from that performance feeling great about it, but listening back it's actually one of our best performances as a band. Sometimes your own thinking and hang-ups in the moment can cloud your judgement. Reviewing recordings really a helps to get beyond this perceptional obstacle, I highly recommend it.

I got a video of a show once where I felt like I played horrible and was expecting to get fired , well I actually nailed it …

Bahahahahahah
 


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