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What would you do with this gretsch snare?

JazzDrumGuy

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The problem with scraping the loose chips and leaving the rest is that the finish will be bumpy and look bad (unless you somehow can sand it flat - but that's doubtful, as it will remove or flake off the rest of the remaining paint). Also, if the drum is so compromised, even with a clear coat, you may have remaining paint chips flake off and leave unfinished exposed spots. All signs point to refinishing it. I have been trying to come up with a duco technique using only a lazy susan contraption and spray paints. So far, not the best of luck. I don't have a sprayer and I much rather prefer (and enjoy!) hand applying stain and hand finishing the drum. Thus, I'm leaning towards a nice mid stain like gunstock or maybe lighter, depending on what the wood looks like after sanding.

I have a 1920's solid mahogany Ludwig 5x14 that was neglected but had the original birds eye maple veneer - just gorgeous! When I refinished it, I just used satin poly inside and out. The wood grain is killer and the inside is nice & even (and a lovely mahogany shade that contrasts the BE maple nicely due to the great condition of the wood for a 100 year old drum.....

If you're gonna wrap it, gotta go aged WMP!
 

Bart grom Poland

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Hey,i dont know how to fix it, one thing , badge with name "Osiecki" must be a guy from my country,from Poland, its Polish name .
 

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coastie

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Nice drum. Personally, I’d leave it alone. Rotate it in and out with your other snares. That is, if you’ve got a rotation. most drummers do.
BTW, it appears in one of your pics that there’s little to no bearing edge cut. Or a very slight inner cut. I know Gretsch was famous for skipping the process. I wonder if this is another example of that?
 

4MoreYearsOhNo

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I did a little demo video on the technique I mentioned above. You can find it in this earlier thread on this same topic.

Thanks for the truly great advice. I always thought lacquer thinner would completely melt the paint, but it doesn't; it seems to only make it a bit tacky, which is exactly what was needed here. Better than clear coating, I think, because clear coat won't get the paint to sit on the drum just cover it as is, all bumpy. It isn't a perfect technique of course - I had to remove the flakes that were almost completely unattached since they would otherwise come off while applying thinner messing up the remaining paint. Once it dries the remaining paint really does stick perfectly; I went over the whole drum and no more paint is flaking.

Drum was quite dirty and needed a delicate cleaning, so instead of starting with the lacquer thinner I used a slightly damp rag first which needs to be done very carefully. It took a while to get technique of dabbing on the thinner, because painting it on was dragging some of the chips off. Also I used a bristle brush since the foam brush I have says not to use with lacquer (I assume the brush might start to dissolve). Anyway, your technique is definitely worth a try before stripping; you don't have anything to lose if you're going to strip anyway.

Some people probably think it looks like crap, but I actually like it. I tend to be a minimalist while working on drums. Certainly shows some of its history.

A little research: Osiecki is a music store that used to be in Erie, PA, but yeah, they were from Poland originally (ad below).

And the Duco paint is on top of grey primer, which I never noticed before. Wonder if that is where Gretsch eventually got the idea to paint the interior of all their drums grey? Maybe the same paint?

Online catalog search shows this is an 8 lug Broadkaster Standard X1451 from 1948,49. Diecast stickchoppers, throw seems correct but missing the round cover. This is when they were making the Gretsch Gladstones, so I wonder if the shells are the same? Does anyone have a Gretsch Gladstone and know the shell thickness? Bearing edges are fine, I would guess maybe 30deg but haven't measured it. And first mistake I've seen in the Rob Cook Gretsch book - he says these Rocket lugs don't have springs inside (p 191) but these do. All the hardware works great, but I need a muffler knob. Don't really want to use one of the later ones but I think that is all I have.

I've had the drum for years, and just couldn't face working on it, because every time I picked it up more paint was flaking off, so I just put it back on the shelf to deal with later. Glad I asked here before starting on it.

More work needed, obviously (need to find a muffler knob, would like to find a throw cover but those are probably too rare), but I stuck it together to take a couple pics before the sun went down completely.
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OsieckiAd1959GenTel.jpg
 

JDA

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Thanks for the truly great advice. I always thought lacquer thinner would completely melt the paint, but it doesn't; it seems to only make it a bit tacky, which is exactly what was needed here. Better than clear coating, I think, because clear coat won't get the paint to sit on the drum just cover it as is, all bumpy. It isn't a perfect technique of course - I had to remove the flakes that were almost completely unattached since they would otherwise come off while applying thinner messing up the remaining paint. Once it dries the remaining paint really does stick perfectly; I went over the whole drum and no more paint is flaking.

Drum was quite dirty and needed a delicate cleaning, so instead of starting with the lacquer thinner I used a slightly damp rag first which needs to be done very carefully. It took a while to get technique of dabbing on the thinner, because painting it on was dragging some of the chips off. Also I used a bristle brush since the foam brush I have says not to use with lacquer (I assume the brush might start to dissolve). Anyway, your technique is definitely worth a try before stripping; you don't have anything to lose if you're going to strip anyway.

Some people probably think it looks like crap, but I actually like it. I tend to be a minimalist while working on drums. Certainly shows some of its history.

A little research: Osiecki is a music store that used to be in Erie, PA, but yeah, they were from Poland originally (ad below).

And the Duco paint is on top of grey primer, which I never noticed before. Wonder if that is where Gretsch eventually got the idea to paint the interior of all their drums grey? Maybe the same paint?

Online catalog search shows this is an 8 lug Broadkaster Standard X1451 from 1948,49. Diecast stickchoppers, throw seems correct but missing the round cover. This is when they were making the Gretsch Gladstones, so I wonder if the shells are the same? Does anyone have a Gretsch Gladstone and know the shell thickness? Bearing edges are fine, I would guess maybe 30deg but haven't measured it. And first mistake I've seen in the Rob Cook Gretsch book - he says these Rocket lugs don't have springs inside (p 191) but these do. All the hardware works great, but I need a muffler knob. Don't really want to use one of the later ones but I think that is all I have.

I've had the drum for years, and just couldn't face working on it, because every time I picked it up more paint was flaking off, so I just put it back on the shelf to deal with later. Glad I asked here before starting on it.

More work needed, obviously (need to find a muffler knob, would like to find a throw cover but those are probably too rare), but I stuck it together to take a couple pics before the sun went down completely.
View attachment 569021 View attachment 569022 View attachment 569026 View attachment 569027
OsieckiAd1959GenTel.jpg
STUNNING because I was ready to buy it off you for cheap :D you had me worried! Erie Pa. o yea!
 

JDA

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it's killin' and I've seen those cover guards on ebay

what's the depth of that shell? approximately? 5.5?

I have that throw off on a 1965 4103 and it's been working perfect for 20 years; not sure you need or if that drum came (with the cover) wouldn't worry
 

Tarkus

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Nice drum, congratulations.

..



Online catalog search shows this is an 8 lug Broadkaster Standard X1451 from 1948,49. Diecast stickchoppers, throw seems correct but missing the round cover. This is when they were making the Gretsch Gladstones, so I wonder if the shells are the same? Does anyone have a Gretsch Gladstone and know the shell thickness? Bearing edges are fine, I would guess maybe 30deg but haven't measured it. And first mistake I've seen in the Rob Cook Gretsch book - he says these Rocket lugs don't have springs inside (p 191) but these do. All the hardware works great, but I need a muffler knob. Don't really want to use one of the later ones but I think that is all I have.

...

As I understood, the Gretsch-Gladstone snares of the 50s had the 'thin' 3 ply maple shells (according to Chet Falzonaro's book). The shell of your snare looks a bit thicker, is this 3-ply? But anyway, if this was the 'top' Gretsch snare shell of the 40s, this would be what Gladstone used. No re-rings was important to him.
 

4MoreYearsOhNo

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Looks cool as is if the lacquer is stabilized.

Guitar players pay extra for that look.
It is *completely* stable now. I can't knock the paint off if I try, seriously. I went over the whole drum after it was dry and nothing was going to come off.
 

4MoreYearsOhNo

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it's killin' and I've seen those cover guards on ebay

what's the depth of that shell? approximately? 5.5?

I have that throw off on a 1965 4103 and it's been working perfect for 20 years; not sure you need or if that drum came (with the cover) wouldn't worry
It's 14 x 6-1/2. Not as big as my 50's RB 15 x 8 Concert Snare Drum (I refer to as "big dog") but plenty big. Still more to do so I haven't put snare wires on it yet, all in good time.
 
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4MoreYearsOhNo

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Nice drum, congratulations.



As I understood, the Gretsch-Gladstone snares of the 50s had the 'thin' 3 ply maple shells (according to Chet Falzonaro's book). The shell of your snare looks a bit thicker, is this 3-ply? But anyway, if this was the 'top' Gretsch snare shell of the 40s, this would be what Gladstone used. No re-rings was important to him.
Not sure, it looks like 4 ply, but not sure that is a thing, so I may be counting wrong? Anyway, it is certainly thicker overall than at least most of the 50's 3-ply drums I have. I'll try to do some measurements with a micrometer next time I take some heads off.
 

4MoreYearsOhNo

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Here it is all together. I dug through my parts and was surprised to find a period correct muffler handle that matches the strainer handle, so I didn't have to find and buy any parts for it. With that and some snares, it's up and running. Its been a long time since I've used a wood snare, it seems I've been using a Supra for forever. So a nice change, and the 6-1/2 extra depth is also fun to play with.
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