What's a Rogers R 360?

Elvis

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dharma bum said:
Mark said:
IThe shell construction of the typical Pearl set was terrible and cant even come close to the quality Birch shells. The luan shells were crudely made, with splintering wood and non-existant bearing edges. If one were to put any amount of pressure on a luan shell, it would probably break. Often, a reinforcing ring was added around the middle to help stabilize the delicate thin wood.
I can attest that my early 70s Pearl kit has questionable shell quality - the floor tom is out of round and the bearing edges rough, plus the interior wood grain is pretty rough as well. Nice blue sparkle wrap, though - I still have 'em, kept in cases all this time, they still look almost new. I also hate the metal bass rims.

There's a R-360 set in a local music store, BTW, that they're selling on consignment - I think asking $550, WMP wrap is yellowed, it's a bit beat up. I considered it, but ... is that a decent price? Four piece, 12-14-20 with some metal snare (nothing decent), metal bass rims.
Really? Because I've got a 14" floor tom with Pearl President lugs all over it and the red sparkle wrap's all nasty and sun faded, but the shell looks great.
...IT must be you. ( :D ;) )
As for that R-360 kit. If its the same vintage as the one's we're discussing here, then depending on the style of tom mount, it could be a Rock Solid that someone has replaced the floor tom with, or its a Double Soul but its missing the other rack tom...and someone's replaced the floor tom.
Both of those kits came with a chromed metal Rogers R-360 14x5 snare drum. Only the Twister came with a wood shelled snare drum.



Elvis
 

Mark

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Elvis said:
Mark said:
I am completely relaxed. I was unaware that my tone was otherwise.
Uh, oh-kay.

Mark said:
The shell construction of the typical Pearl set was terrible and cant even come close to the quality Birch shells. The luan shells were crudely made, with splintering wood and non-existant bearing edges. If one were to put any amount of pressure on a luan shell, it would probably break. Often, a reinforcing ring was added around the middle to help stabilize the delicate thin wood.
You're referring to an older shell design that used paper thin shells. I know, my first kit was like that.
The shells from the era that we're referring to are a thicker, non-reinforced shell.
Luan won't break if you put any "pressure" on it, any quicker than any other shell. They're all laminated wood shells, so they're made to be flexible yet strong.
My old CB-700's had just as "nice" of a shell as my old Rogers R-360 kit had.
Still, I never said any of those kits had "junk" shells. I don't consider that wood, or the quality of their construction, to be "junk".

Mark said:
Sorry, but I disagree with the idea that luan and birch share similar sound characteristics.

I hear it quite clearly. This is why I often tend to describe the sound of Luan as "Aggressive Birch". If you can't, that's not my fault, but you are welcome to your opinion.

Mark said:
Concerning bent rims, they usually become that way from abuse or improper tuning, no matter what brand they are. I had a Red Ripple Twister set a few years ago and the hoops were great- Gleaming chrome and perfectly round. Maybe someone replaced the original rims on your set with Ludwig rims. :p
Well of course that's why. I never suggested anything else.
These were budget/student line kits, so guess who the majority of owners are going to be...... :idea1: (yeeeess)
True, the rims could've been replaced by a former owner, but I wasn't commenting that it was due to any fault of the manufacturer, either, as you seem to be aluding to.
As for the Ludwig remark, actually the comments I always heard in my younger days concerned Rogers rims. I didn't know that Ludwig also made a very thin rim until years later.
The more experienced drummers coveted Rogers rims back when I was first getting into drums, because they often allowed a cold and rather dry sounding drum to "open up" and gain a slightly fatter and warmer sound.

Mark said:
The typical hardware of a 60's Japanese set like Pearl doesnt even come close to that of a Yamaha or R-380. The strainers on Yamahas were excellent and basically were copies of Ludwig strainers. The R-360/380 snare drums used actual Rogers strainers which worked perfectly. The snare mechanisms on Pearl drums and other brands were extremely cheap and unreliable. Same with their internal tone controls. Joe Thompson designed the lugs and floor tom brackets on the R-360/80 drums so that says a lot.
Oh man, you're gonna keep beating this dead horse until its hamburger, aren't you?
Pretty much ALL drum hardware was made of a fairly cheap "pot metal" back then. Where you been?
None were really any worse or better than any other. It just depended on how well you took care of it.
If Joe Thompson designed the hardware for those R-360 drums, that's great. That doesn't neccessarily give it any "God-like" qualities over any other hardware.though. In fact, I always hated the fact that the F.tom legs need a freakin' drum key to adjust them. Why not use regular ol' T-bolts like everyone else does?...and sticking straIght out of the lug? Worst location possible. They were forever catching on things.
As for quality, once again, nothing "spectacular". Serviceable, yes, but nothing to write home about.

If this is your favourite brand, fine. More power to ya. There's a Twister kit going for $1700 on E-bay right now. The link is at the beginning of this thread. You better hurry up and buy it before someone else nabs it....because if you didn't, that would be....a crime. :eek:
However, have enough respect for other people's experiences with the same series of drum, so as not to use their comments to try to make yourself look better.
Say what you know about it, then leave it alone. If someone asks you something about it, fine that's a different story.




Elvis
I'm sorry. I guess I was only trying to make myself look better. I'll try not to disagree with you or post conflicting opinions in the future. And since you owned one set back in 1986 and have a catalog, you obviously know much more about the R-360/80 drums than I do.
 

rondrums51

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Mark said:
I am completely relaxed. I was unaware that my tone was otherwise.

I still maintain, however that 60's-early 70's Yamaha and R-360/80 drums were way ahead of Japanese drums from the same era in terms of construction, attention to detail, and quality of materials.

The shell construction of the typical Pearl set was terrible and cant even come close to the quality Birch shells. The luan shells were crudely made, with splintering wood and non-existant bearing edges. If one were to put any amount of pressure on a luan shell, it would probably break. Often, a reinforcing ring was added around the middle to help stabilize the delicate thin wood.

Sorry, but I disagree with the idea that luan and birch share similar sound characteristics.

The Yamaha/ R-360/80 pearl finishes were superior as well.

Concerning bent rims, they usually become that way from abuse or improper tuning, no matter what brand they are. I had a Red Ripple Twister set a few years ago and the hoops were great- Gleaming chrome and perfectly round. Maybe someone replaced the original rims on your set with Ludwig rims. :p

The typical hardware of a 60's Japanese set like Pearl doesnt even come close to that of a Yamaha or R-380. The strainers on Yamahas were excellent and basically were copies of Ludwig strainers. The R-360/380 snare drums used actual Rogers strainers which worked perfectly. The snare mechanisms on Pearl drums and other brands were extremely cheap and unreliable. Same with their internal tone controls. Joe Thompson designed the lugs and floor tom brackets on the R-360/80 drums so that says a lot.

Of course, these are only my opinions based on my experiences and I respect the opinions of others.
I agree. In the 60's and early 70's, Yamaha made better junk drums than the other Asian companies. Still junk, but better junk.
 

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rondrums51 said:
I agree. In the 60's and early 70's, Yamaha made better junk drums than the other Asian companies. Still junk, but better junk.
OK, I'll take the bait. I am effing tired of the misinformation being spread by people who may have never actually owned or played one of these kits. What is the purpose of a comment like that? What does that add to the body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums? Nothing. If you don't have anything constructive to say, this would be a great time to SHUT UP!
 

dharma bum

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Elvis said:
dharma bum said:
Mark said:
IThe shell construction of the typical Pearl set was terrible and cant even come close to the quality Birch shells. The luan shells were crudely made, with splintering wood and non-existant bearing edges. If one were to put any amount of pressure on a luan shell, it would probably break. Often, a reinforcing ring was added around the middle to help stabilize the delicate thin wood.
I can attest that my early 70s Pearl kit has questionable shell quality - the floor tom is out of round and the bearing edges rough, plus the interior wood grain is pretty rough as well. Nice blue sparkle wrap, though - I still have 'em, kept in cases all this time, they still look almost new. I also hate the metal bass rims.

There's a R-360 set in a local music store, BTW, that they're selling on consignment - I think asking $550, WMP wrap is yellowed, it's a bit beat up. I considered it, but ... is that a decent price? Four piece, 12-14-20 with some metal snare (nothing decent), metal bass rims.
Really? Because I've got a 14" floor tom with Pearl President lugs all over it and the red sparkle wrap's all nasty and sun faded, but the shell looks great.
...IT must be you. ( :D ;) )
As for that R-360 kit. If its the same vintage as the one's we're discussing here, then depending on the style of tom mount, it could be a Rock Solid that someone has replaced the floor tom with, or its a Double Soul but its missing the other rack tom...and someone's replaced the floor tom.
Both of those kits came with a chromed metal Rogers R-360 14x5 snare drum. Only the Twister came with a wood shelled snare drum.



Elvis
It could totally be me - after all, it was the seventies, I was a kid, I took off the bottom hoops of the toms and the bass front head, put a pillow in the bass, put tape on the ride cymbal 'cause it seemed too ringy.... MAN that felt good to admit all that, and I just saved $200 on therapy. Fortunately I learned over time, and I saved all the hoops and rods, so I could later un-do all the damage.
 

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dharma bum,

You're welcome. Glad I could aid in the recovery of your metal health. ;) :D

BTW, have you gone back to see the R-360 kit?
I think I forgot to mention in my last response to you, that if it has a Rail Mount for the rack tom, then it would be a "Rock Solid" with a different floor tom (if its of the vintage of the kits we're discussing here).

I would think that, even in decent condition, the price would be a little lower.
After all, when all is said and done, they're still 35-40 year old budget/student kits.


JMHO, and no disrespect to anyone here who may think otherwise.





Elvis
 

dharma bum

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Elvis said:
dharma bum,

You're welcome. Glad I could aid in the recovery of your metal health. ;) :D

BTW, have you gone back to see the R-360 kit?
I think I forgot to mention in my last response to you, that if it has a Rail Mount for the rack tom, then it would be a "Rock Solid" with a different floor tom (if its of the vintage of the kits we're discussing here).

I would think that, even in decent condition, the price would be a little lower.
After all, when all is said and done, they're still 35-40 year old budget/student kits.


JMHO, and no disrespect to anyone here who may think otherwise.





Elvis


Thanks Elvis - Im goin' back tomorrow to check on it - I'll let y'all know.
 

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<p class='citation'>Elvis said:</p><div class="blockquote"><div class='quote'>dharma bum,

You're welcome. Glad I could aid in the recovery of your metal health. ;) :D

BTW, have you gone back to see the R-360 kit?
I think I forgot to mention in my last response to you, that if it has a Rail Mount for the rack tom, then it would be a "Rock Solid" with a different floor tom (if its of the vintage of the kits we're discussing here).

I would think that, even in decent condition, the price would be a little lower.
After all, when all is said and done, they're still 35-40 year old budget/student kits.


JMHO, and no disrespect to anyone here who may think otherwise.





Elvis</div></div>

Thanks Elvis - Im goin' back tomorrow to check on it - I'll let y'all know.

I think Mark is just stating the obvious truth about the "Made in Japan" kits from that time. I previously owned a R-360 and presently own a R-380 from the 60's, and I also owned numerous, (approx. 25), MIJ kits made by Tama & Pearl, and I think the R-360's & 380's are way better than the other Japan kits. The shells, lugs, hoops, hardware seem superior to the other Japan made kits. Star drums may come close, but still far behind the Yams and Rogers.

BTW, I own 3 x 60's Vintage Ludwig Superclassics, 1 DW collectors and, 1 Ayotte kit and I still love sitting behind the R-380's.

The early Yamaha's & R-360/380's were truly the beginning of high quality "Made in Japan" Drums.
 

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rondrums51 said:
I agree. In the 60's and early 70's, Yamaha made better junk drums than the other Asian companies. Still junk, but better junk.
OK, I'll take the bait. I am effing tired of the misinformation being spread by people who may have never actually owned or played one of these kits. What is the purpose of a comment like that? What does that add to the body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums? Nothing. If you don't have anything constructive to say, this would be a great time to SHUT UP!
No misinformation here:

I taught in a music store that had several sets of the Yamaha/Rogers 360 and 380 drums. I played them all the time and used them in my lessons. The wood was inferior, the edge work on the shells was lousy, the fittings had cheap chrome plating and were flimsy, and there were a dozen other obvious cost-cutting aspects to the drums. I was embarrassed to see the Rogers name on these drums.

They were OK drums for a student.

Yamaha is the company that is now using the Rogers name to sell cheap s**t drum kits. It's an aberration, and it's an insult to Joe Thompson.

So that's my addition to the "body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums."

OK, now I'll shut up.
 

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rondrums51 said:
I agree. In the 60's and early 70's, Yamaha made better junk drums than the other Asian companies. Still junk, but better junk.
OK, I'll take the bait. I am effing tired of the misinformation being spread by people who may have never actually owned or played one of these kits. What is the purpose of a comment like that? What does that add to the body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums? Nothing. If you don't have anything constructive to say, this would be a great time to SHUT UP!
No misinformation here:

I taught in a music store that had several sets of the Yamaha/Rogers 360 and 380 drums. I played them all the time and used them in my lessons. The wood was inferior, the edge work on the shells was lousy, the fittings had cheap chrome plating and were flimsy, and there were a dozen other obvious cost-cutting aspects to the drums. I was embarrassed to see the Rogers name on these drums.

They were OK drums for a student.

Yamaha is the company that is now using the Rogers name to sell cheap s**t drum kits. It's an aberration, and it's an insult to Joe Thompson.

So that's my addition to the "body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums."

OK, now I'll shut up.
+1. Now I'll shut up, too.
 

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rondrums51 said:
I agree. In the 60's and early 70's, Yamaha made better junk drums than the other Asian companies. Still junk, but better junk.
OK, I'll take the bait. I am effing tired of the misinformation being spread by people who may have never actually owned or played one of these kits. What is the purpose of a comment like that? What does that add to the body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums? Nothing. If you don't have anything constructive to say, this would be a great time to SHUT UP!
No misinformation here:

I taught in a music store that had several sets of the Yamaha/Rogers 360 and 380 drums. I played them all the time and used them in my lessons. The wood was inferior, the edge work on the shells was lousy, the fittings had cheap chrome plating and were flimsy, and there were a dozen other obvious cost-cutting aspects to the drums. I was embarrassed to see the Rogers name on these drums.

They were OK drums for a student.

Yamaha is the company that is now using the Rogers name to sell cheap s**t drum kits. It's an aberration, and it's an insult to Joe Thompson.

So that's my addition to the "body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums."

OK, now I'll shut up.
+1. Now I'll shut up, too.

Are you sure those were from the 60's?? The R-360's & 380's from the 60's were totally different from the later 80's version.

Like I mentioned earlier, I had a 360 and I presently own a 380, the bearing edges are clean & well defined, the shells are round-true-level, the chrome is in excellent shape. Now, 2 out of 2 drums that are excellent is enough for me to say that they were great drums.

One of my Vintage Ludwig sets has a rack tom that is out of round. I had to find and buy a tom from the same era in order to play with the drumset. The bearing edges are not well defined and everyone loves the Luddys because it adds character to the drum sound.

The earlier R-360's & 380's are not in the same league as the Made in USA Rogers, but compared to all other MIJ drums at the time, the 360's & 380's were truly superior.

By the way, Ludwig & Gretsch also put their names on low quality drums manufacturerd in China.
 

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rondrums51 said:
I agree. In the 60's and early 70's, Yamaha made better junk drums than the other Asian companies. Still junk, but better junk.
OK, I'll take the bait. I am effing tired of the misinformation being spread by people who may have never actually owned or played one of these kits. What is the purpose of a comment like that? What does that add to the body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums? Nothing. If you don't have anything constructive to say, this would be a great time to SHUT UP!
No misinformation here:

I taught in a music store that had several sets of the Yamaha/Rogers 360 and 380 drums. I played them all the time and used them in my lessons. The wood was inferior, the edge work on the shells was lousy, the fittings had cheap chrome plating and were flimsy, and there were a dozen other obvious cost-cutting aspects to the drums. I was embarrassed to see the Rogers name on these drums.

They were OK drums for a student.

Yamaha is the company that is now using the Rogers name to sell cheap s**t drum kits. It's an aberration, and it's an insult to Joe Thompson.

So that's my addition to the "body of knowledge regarding the Yamaha/R-360/R-380 drums."

OK, now I'll shut up.
Ron, now that you're providing observations based on hands-on experience, I can accept that. In this and other threads on this topic you've previously stated that these kits are "junk" but offered no information as to why you felt that way. I was rash to have told you to shut up and for that I apologize.

If you happen to see another YamaRogers kit, you will probably avoid it. If I see one and the price is right, I may well buy it. Although Joe Thompson designed the R-360/R-380 lugs, the YamaRogers diamond-plate tom mount assembly is inferior. Most USA manufacturers had already abandoned the diamond-plate/shoe system by the mid-1960s and for good reason. Too bad that the YamaRogers production team didn't invest a little more on that crucial hardware system; the product line could have enjoyed greater success.

Now I'll shut up.
 

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It is understood that the Yamaha-Rogers series drums were purpose built as entry level drums, with a certain sacrifice in quality. In that era the Japanese were also attempting to produce cars and other industrial products for the U.S. market with limited success in wooing American buyers. The relatively high quality and low price of these Rogers badged drums with some inferior hardware designs is another example of testing the U. S. market with "inexpensive, made-in-Japan imitations of good American products." This was, of course well before the introduction of the Honda CVCC (Civic) automobile, as well as the Accord or any such thing. Datsun wouldn't have the 240Z--the first huge Japanese industrial success since the transistor radio--for another couple of years. The mid to late 70s is when Japanese goods started looking better to the American psyche. Arguably, the Detroit automakers could be blamed for the big tumble in perceived American quality of goods, overall.

So, 40 years later, a vintage made-in-USA Rogers drum set is reasonably priced. Why would someone want an R series or a Duplex for that matter? With respect, I think it's wise to save the money, time and space for the real deal.
 

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"...Rogers badged drums with some inferior hardware..."

Perhaps you could offer examples of the inferior hardware that was installed on the R-360/380 or Yamaha drums of the late 60's-early 70's. Here are some photos of 60's Yamaha and R-360's.





 

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Why do they have to be called junk?? They were never meant to compete again the top of the line drums. I have owned several R-series kits from the 60s/70s (and am currently restoring a kit) and have found them to be be well built, quality drums . . . birch shells, quality chrome plating, well defined bearing edges . . . no, not of the same caliber as the standard Rogers drums, but they weren't meant to be and they were definitely of a higher grade than other Japanese kits of the time. I view these drums as a progression in the history of drum making. The mounts are no different than the diamond plates used on drums for years and that many of you still use on your vintage kits today . . . they are junk on the R-series, but but let someone pull the diamond-plate/shoe system off a vintage American kit and re-drill for a modern mounting system and everyone raises holy heck . . . and anyone that says the Duplex drums from the same era are junk has obviously never seen one of these kits up close and in person . . . they use the same shells, wrap, hoops, claws, t-rods, & tension rods as the high end Rogers and the drum hardware (the same as the R-series) and chrome is as high a quality as anything else on the market at that time . . . I will put put my Duplex kit nose to nose with any other kit that was on the market at that time . . . I have never been a big fan Gretsch drums . . . I think they are over-rated . . . some of the bearing edges on those old drums were horrendous and the pathetic mounts and snare throw-offs they came up with, the metal snares were a joke, but I don't call them junk . . . oh well, I guess it just goes to show you that one man's junk is another man's treasure . . . NAD
 

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It is understood that the Yamaha-Rogers series drums were purpose built as entry level drums, with a certain sacrifice in quality. In that era the Japanese were also attempting to produce cars and other industrial products for the U.S. market with limited success in wooing American buyers. The relatively high quality and low price of these Rogers badged drums with some inferior hardware designs is another example of testing the U. S. market with "inexpensive, made-in-Japan imitations of good American products." This was, of course well before the introduction of the Honda CVCC (Civic) automobile, as well as the Accord or any such thing. Datsun wouldn't have the 240Z--the first huge Japanese industrial success since the transistor radio--for another couple of years. The mid to late 70s is when Japanese goods started looking better to the American psyche. Arguably, the Detroit automakers could be blamed for the big tumble in perceived American quality of goods, overall.

So, 40 years later, a vintage made-in-USA Rogers drum set is reasonably priced. Why would someone want an R series or a Duplex for that matter? With respect, I think it's wise to save the money, time and space for the real deal.

Tommykat, define reasonably priced. The difference in price between an American made Rogers kit and a Japan Made Rogers kit that is in as pristine condition as Mark posted is enormous. Mark probably sold the kit for 700 odd dollars, can you find an American made Rogers, (with snare), in the same pristine condition that Mark had for less than 2000? If so, let me know, I'm a buyer.

USA Rogers were/are fantastic DRUMS, so were the first generation R-360's & 380's.

In the 50's and early 60's Japanese companies were producing inexpensive items that were exported to the US. The quality of those items / drums were not up to par with USA made items. Yamaha started manufacturing drums in the mid 60's, later than the other companies already doing so for years. Yamaha had the opportunity to benefit from the other companys' manufacturing and marketing errors. They went all out - with what little experience they had in drum manufacturing. That's probably why a big named, quality company like Rogers associated themselves with Yamaha. In those days a High Quality Name meant something, not like today. I'm sure if you look carefully at the Ludwig Accent drums you'll probably read Wudwig.

Mark, your pictures are amazing........I wish I could have quality pics like you.
 

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It is understood that the Yamaha-Rogers series drums were purpose built as entry level drums, with a certain sacrifice in quality. In that era the Japanese were also attempting to produce cars and other industrial products for the U.S. market with limited success in wooing American buyers. The relatively high quality and low price of these Rogers badged drums with some inferior hardware designs is another example of testing the U. S. market with "inexpensive, made-in-Japan imitations of good American products." This was, of course well before the introduction of the Honda CVCC (Civic) automobile, as well as the Accord or any such thing. Datsun wouldn't have the 240Z--the first huge Japanese industrial success since the transistor radio--for another couple of years. The mid to late 70s is when Japanese goods started looking better to the American psyche. Arguably, the Detroit automakers could be blamed for the big tumble in perceived American quality of goods, overall.

So, 40 years later, a vintage made-in-USA Rogers drum set is reasonably priced. Why would someone want an R series or a Duplex for that matter? With respect, I think it's wise to save the money, time and space for the real deal.

Tommykat, define reasonably priced. The difference in price between an American made Rogers kit and a Japan Made Rogers kit that is in as pristine condition as Mark posted is enormous. Mark probably sold the kit for 700 odd dollars, can you find an American made Rogers, (with snare), in the same pristine condition that Mark had for less than 2000? If so, let me know, I'm a buyer.

USA Rogers were/are fantastic DRUMS, so were the first generation R-360's & 380's.

In the 50's and early 60's Japanese companies were producing inexpensive items that were exported to the US. The quality of those items / drums were not up to par with USA made items. Yamaha started manufacturing drums in the mid 60's, later than the other companies already doing so for years. Yamaha had the opportunity to benefit from the other companys' manufacturing and marketing errors. They went all out - with what little experience they had in drum manufacturing. That's probably why a big named, quality company like Rogers associated themselves with Yamaha. In those days a High Quality Name meant something, not like today. I'm sure if you look carefully at the Ludwig Accent drums you'll probably read Wudwig.

Mark, your pictures are amazing........I wish I could have quality pics like you.
Thanks! Glad you like the photos. The blue willow set was sold to a drummer in Spain and the red pearl Yamaha was sold to a collector in New Jersey. Both sets were in near mint condition and sold in the $1000 range, as I remember. The red pearl set had a film of yellowed wax about an inch thick on every drum. While it definitely protected the finish, it took about a week of cleaning to remove the wax and restore the original shine.



 

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Ron, now that you're providing observations based on hands-on experience, I can accept that. In this and other threads on this topic you've previously stated that these kits are "junk" but offered no information as to why you felt that way. I was rash to have told you to shut up and for that I apologize.

If you happen to see another YamaRogers kit, you will probably avoid it. If I see one and the price is right, I may well buy it. Although Joe Thompson designed the R-360/R-380 lugs, the YamaRogers diamond-plate tom mount assembly is inferior. Most USA manufacturers had already abandoned the diamond-plate/shoe system by the mid-1960s and for good reason. Too bad that the YamaRogers production team didn't invest a little more on that crucial hardware system; the product line could have enjoyed greater success.

Now I'll shut up.
Hey, Poot. No offense taken, at all. And no need to shut up. Your input is valuable here.

You know what it is, really? I'm originally from Ohio. All the older local drummers I came up with, as well as my peers, were so proud of Rogers drums, because they were an Ohio product. And they were widely considered to be the best-engineered drums in the world.

When the cheap Asian crap drums came out in the 60's, everybody laughed at them. They were mostly pathetic copies of Ludwig and Slingerland.

But the Rogers 360's and 380's that came later--in the 70's and 80's--were particularly offensive to all of us die-hard Rogers fans.

I will reiterate that the 380's, in particular, were much better than the typical Asian junk. Like I said, I used several sets in the store I was teaching at, and I also played a house set frequently on a gig I was doing.

But watching the Rogers company going offshore was so sad.
 

drumsterguy

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It is understood that the Yamaha-Rogers series drums were purpose built as entry level drums, with a certain sacrifice in quality. In that era the Japanese were also attempting to produce cars and other industrial products for the U.S. market with limited success in wooing American buyers. The relatively high quality and low price of these Rogers badged drums with some inferior hardware designs is another example of testing the U. S. market with "inexpensive, made-in-Japan imitations of good American products." This was, of course well before the introduction of the Honda CVCC (Civic) automobile, as well as the Accord or any such thing. Datsun wouldn't have the 240Z--the first huge Japanese industrial success since the transistor radio--for another couple of years. The mid to late 70s is when Japanese goods started looking better to the American psyche. Arguably, the Detroit automakers could be blamed for the big tumble in perceived American quality of goods, overall.

So, 40 years later, a vintage made-in-USA Rogers drum set is reasonably priced. Why would someone want an R series or a Duplex for that matter? With respect, I think it's wise to save the money, time and space for the real deal.

Tommykat, define reasonably priced. The difference in price between an American made Rogers kit and a Japan Made Rogers kit that is in as pristine condition as Mark posted is enormous. Mark probably sold the kit for 700 odd dollars, can you find an American made Rogers, (with snare), in the same pristine condition that Mark had for less than 2000? If so, let me know, I'm a buyer.

USA Rogers were/are fantastic DRUMS, so were the first generation R-360's & 380's.

In the 50's and early 60's Japanese companies were producing inexpensive items that were exported to the US. The quality of those items / drums were not up to par with USA made items. Yamaha started manufacturing drums in the mid 60's, later than the other companies already doing so for years. Yamaha had the opportunity to benefit from the other companys' manufacturing and marketing errors. They went all out - with what little experience they had in drum manufacturing. That's probably why a big named, quality company like Rogers associated themselves with Yamaha. In those days a High Quality Name meant something, not like today. I'm sure if you look carefully at the Ludwig Accent drums you'll probably read Wudwig.

Mark, your pictures are amazing........I wish I could have quality pics like you.
Thanks! Glad you like the photos. The blue willow set was sold to a drummer in Spain and the red pearl Yamaha was sold to a collector in New Jersey. Both sets were in near mint condition and sold in the $1000 range, as I remember. The red pearl set had a film of yellowed wax about an inch thick on every drum. While it definitely protected the finish, it took about a week of cleaning to remove the wax and restore the original shine.

These are pics of my previously owned Rogers USA & R-360 and of my newly acquired R-380 Red ripple.
 

poot

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You know what it is, really? I'm originally from Ohio. All the older local drummers I came up with, as well as my peers, were so proud of Rogers drums, because they were an Ohio product. And they were widely considered to be the best-engineered drums in the world.

When the cheap Asian crap drums came out in the 60's, everybody laughed at them. They were mostly pathetic copies of Ludwig and Slingerland.

But the Rogers 360's and 380's that came later--in the 70's and 80's--were particularly offensive to all of us die-hard Rogers fans.

I will reiterate that the 380's, in particular, were much better than the typical Asian junk. Like I said, I used several sets in the store I was teaching at, and I also played a house set frequently on a gig I was doing.

But watching the Rogers company going offshore was so sad.
Ron,

Just to clarify - the R-360s/380s from the late '70s and 1980s were very different from the late '60s/early '70s kits that Mark and drumsterguy have shown in this thread. If the kit from your teaching days looked more like this one (with twin pipe mounts) they were of completely different construction than the early "YamaRogers" kits. I believe these later kits had luan shells and generally very poor quality. Can you clarify which type of kit you were using?
 


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