What's a Rogers R 360?

tommykat1

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"...Rogers badged drums with some inferior hardware..."

Perhaps you could offer examples of the inferior hardware that was installed on the R-360/380 or Yamaha drums of the late 60's-early 70's. Here are some photos of 60's Yamaha and R-360's.





The diamond hangers.

Anyway, there are markets for both products. I'm merely posing that it might be prudent to save your money for the real deal. That has been my choice; there's no right or wrong.
 

Elvis

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These are pics of my previously owned Rogers USA & R-360 and of my newly acquired R-380 Red ripple.
Drumsterguy,

Congrats on your latest aquisition. Those are some nice looking drums.
The R-360 kit, seen in the upper right hand corner of your post, is listed as a "Rock Solid" model in my flyer (previously referred to as a "catalogue", in earlier posts I made).
20" BD, 12" RT, 16" FT, metal 14x5 SD.
I noticed in Mark's earlier pics (nice drum, btw!) that the early R-380's seem to share the same lug as the early R-360.
I had those lugs on my Twister kit, as well.



Elvis
 

drumsterguy

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These are pics of my previously owned Rogers USA & R-360 and of my newly acquired R-380 Red ripple.
Drumsterguy,

Congrats on your latest aquisition. Those are some nice looking drums.
The R-360 kit, seen in the upper right hand corner of your post, is listed as a "Rock Solid" model in my flyer (previously referred to as a "catalogue", in earlier posts I made).
20" BD, 12" RT, 16" FT, metal 14x5 SD.
I noticed in Mark's earlier pics (nice drum, btw!) that the early R-380's seem to share the same lug as the early R-360.
I had those lugs on my Twister kit, as well.



Elvis

Speaking of those same lugs, what is the difference between a R-360 & R-380??? I asked that same question on a different Drum Forum, but nobody seems to know.

Does anybody know what the difference is between the R-360 & R-380?
 

rondrums

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Speaking of those same lugs, what is the difference between a R-360 & R-380??? I asked that same question on a different Drum Forum, but nobody seems to know.

Does anybody know what the difference is between the R-360 & R-380?
360's were cheap s**t beginner drums. 380's were better, kind of semi-professional.

I have no idea why everybody is obsessing over these drums in this thread. I guess it's because Yamaha has become the biggest musical instrument maker in the world, so people are interested in their early history, which was making cheap crap copies of Western drums in the 60's.

Meanwhile, Ludwig, Gretsch, Premier, and a half-dozen other western manufacturers made top-quality drums since the early 1900's.

I'm not a fan of the "global economy." I think that heritage means something, and as Americans, we should support whatever is left of American manufacturing.
 

tommykat1

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Speaking of those same lugs, what is the difference between a R-360 & R-380??? I asked that same question on a different Drum Forum, but nobody seems to know.

Does anybody know what the difference is between the R-360 & R-380?
360's were cheap s**t beginner drums. 380's were better, kind of semi-professional.

I have no idea why everybody is obsessing over these drums in this thread. I guess it's because Yamaha has become the biggest musical instrument maker in the world, so people are interested in their early history, which was making cheap crap copies of Western drums in the 60's.

Meanwhile, Ludwig, Gretsch, Premier, and a half-dozen other western manufacturers made top-quality drums since the early 1900's.

I'm not a fan of the "global economy." I think that heritage means something, and as Americans, we should support whatever is left of American manufacturing.
+1 :occasion5: :notworthy:
 

drums147

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Speaking of those same lugs, what is the difference between a R-360 & R-380??? I asked that same question on a different Drum Forum, but nobody seems to know.

Does anybody know what the difference is between the R-360 & R-380?
360's were cheap s**t beginner drums. 380's were better, kind of semi-professional.

I have no idea why everybody is obsessing over these drums in this thread. I guess it's because Yamaha has become the biggest musical instrument maker in the world, so people are interested in their early history, which was making cheap crap copies of Western drums in the 60's.

Meanwhile, Ludwig, Gretsch, Premier, and a half-dozen other western manufacturers made top-quality drums since the early 1900's.

I'm not a fan of the "global economy." I think that heritage means something, and as Americans, we should support whatever is left of American manufacturing.

I'm not sure how the "360's were cheap s**t beginner drums. 380's were better, kind of semi-professional" since they were virtually the same drums. IMHO we’re not “obsessing” . . . I think we’re just joining together to discuss and learn a little bit about the history of Rogers drums . . . those that forget the past are destined to relive it . . .

From my observations, in the beginning the difference was that the 360 had a six-lug snare, lighter hardware (stands and such) and I suppose some finishes . . . I have been told that some of the 360s had a six-lug FT, but I have never seen one.

The six-lug snare seemed to have gone away shortly after they were introduced and they all went to 8-lugs . . . I suppose they figured out it was cheaper to drill them all the same instead of two different configurations.

I have seen some of the 380s with real tack-on badges, but all 360s I have ever seen have sticker badges. I also have a 380 WMP FT that has a Rogers script badge, which I believe is factory.

Somewhere during the run of this series the tension casings (lugs) changed from a heavy wall to a thinner wall and the springs got lighter . . . this is about the only way I know to tell early from late.

Everything else was the same between the 360s and 380s, same hoops, drum hardware, mounts, birch shells, etc. . . . really the only significant difference was the hardware (stands and such) . . if anyone can add to, verify, or correct this please feel free to jump in . . . NAD B)
 

Elvis

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These are pics of my previously owned Rogers USA & R-360 and of my newly acquired R-380 Red ripple.
Drumsterguy,

Congrats on your latest aquisition. Those are some nice looking drums.
The R-360 kit, seen in the upper right hand corner of your post, is listed as a "Rock Solid" model in my flyer (previously referred to as a "catalogue", in earlier posts I made).
20" BD, 12" RT, 16" FT, metal 14x5 SD.
I noticed in Mark's earlier pics (nice drum, btw!) that the early R-380's seem to share the same lug as the early R-360.
I had those lugs on my Twister kit, as well.



Elvis

Speaking of those same lugs, what is the difference between a R-360 & R-380??? I asked that same question on a different Drum Forum, but nobody seems to know.

Does anybody know what the difference is between the R-360 & R-380?
Like Ron mentioned, the R-380's were a little nicer.
I'm not sure, but if I had to guess, I'd say the shells were the same between the R-360 and the R-380.
Remember, we're referring to the "twilight" of an era when it was more about the appointments, than the shell itself.
Also, the R-380 seems to have had different "options" available to it, compared to the R-360.
That tom holder, for instance, is not shown on any of the R-360 kits in my flyer.
Also, that finish is not shown or even mentioned.
In the later incarnation of the R's 360/380, the differences are more apparent.
The 380's had the "better", beefier, hardware and more finish/size options available.
I think there were different style and/or sized snare drums available, too.
The 360's soldiered on with the basic hardware only, fewer finish schemes and fewer size options.



Elvis
 

drumsterguy

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Speaking of those same lugs, what is the difference between a R-360 & R-380??? I asked that same question on a different Drum Forum, but nobody seems to know.

Does anybody know what the difference is between the R-360 & R-380?
360's were cheap s**t beginner drums. 380's were better, kind of semi-professional.

I have no idea why everybody is obsessing over these drums in this thread. I guess it's because Yamaha has become the biggest musical instrument maker in the world, so people are interested in their early history, which was making cheap crap copies of Western drums in the 60's.

Meanwhile, Ludwig, Gretsch, Premier, and a half-dozen other western manufacturers made top-quality drums since the early 1900's.

I'm not a fan of the "global economy." I think that heritage means something, and as Americans, we should support whatever is left of American manufacturing.

No obsession here, just information seeking. The r-360's were not sh*t, actually they are almost identical to the r-380's, just wanted to know the difference between both series. They are still part of Rogers history.

Anyhow,they are well made drums with great looks and sound that were available to people who could not afford the more expensive US made drums at the time.

Peace.
 

SwivoNut

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Although the early R-360 and R-380 outfits were better quality drums than the second generation, they still lacked the quality,workmanship and materials demanded by the top professionals of the day and none was able to garner any endorsers that I know of. In an attempt to distance the imports from the quality American made Rogers, their oval labels proclaimed them as "R-360 by Rogers" and "R-380 by Rogers" similar to how General Motors advertised their lesser expensive car as "Cimmeron by Cadillac," being careful to never call it a "Cadillac" in their ads. The subsequent R-340 series with their Pre-tensioned-systems and synthetic Acousticon shells made by Remo were even worse, and the Series II was a complete disaster. By 1987 Island Music was marketing their 1000 and 5000 series which sported the "Rogers" name and the familiar Big R badge, but with squared off corners and dropping the "USA." These drums had a little better tom mounting hardware than Rogers R-3xx series but the overall quality of the shells and chrome plating was no better. They revived the 5-line chrome Dynasonic snare drum but it was made of steel, not brass. None of the various reincarnations since the demise of Rogers has come close to matching the quality, workmanship and materials of the original Cleveland, Dayton and Fullerton drums that we Rogers fans love and cherish.
Amen.
 

drumsterguy

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In an attempt to distance the imports from the quality American made Rogers, their oval labels proclaimed them as "R-360 by Rogers" and "R-380 by Rogers" similar to how General Motors advertised their lesser expensive car as "Cimmeron by Cadillac," being careful to never call it a "Cadillac" in their ads.

Sort of like today's ROGERS by Yamaha :wink: .
 

poot

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In an attempt to distance the imports from the quality American made Rogers, their oval labels proclaimed them as "R-360 by Rogers" and "R-380 by Rogers" similar to how General Motors advertised their lesser expensive car as "Cimmeron by Cadillac," being careful to never call it a "Cadillac" in their ads.

Sort of like today's ROGERS by Yamaha :wink: .
Pacific by DW? Oh, but that's another thread.
 

drums147

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Although the early R-360 and R-380 outfits were better quality drums than the second generation, they still lacked the quality,workmanship and materials demanded by the top professionals of the day and none was able to garner any endorsers that I know of. In an attempt to distance the imports from the quality American made Rogers, their oval labels proclaimed them as "R-360 by Rogers" and "R-380 by Rogers" similar to how General Motors advertised their lesser expensive car as "Cimmeron by Cadillac," being careful to never call it a "Cadillac" in their ads. The subsequent R-340 series with their Pre-tensioned-systems and synthetic Acousticon shells made by Remo were even worse, and the Series II was a complete disaster. By 1987 Island Music was marketing their 1000 and 5000 series which sported the "Rogers" name and the familiar Big R badge, but with squared off corners and dropping the "USA." These drums had a little better tom mounting hardware than Rogers R-3xx series but the overall quality of the shells and chrome plating was no better. They revived the 5-line chrome Dynasonic snare drum but it was made of steel, not brass. None of the various reincarnations since the demise of Rogers has come close to matching the quality, workmanship and materials of the original Cleveland, Dayton and Fullerton drums that we Rogers fans love and cherish.
Amen.

They were never meant to meet the demands of top-professionals or to garner any endorsers . . . they were for beginners . . . yes, just like the the "new Rogers" . . . NAD
 

Elvis

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FWIW, I've played around with the new Rogers, last summer.
It didn't sound too bad.
Surprisingly "round" and resonant. The shell was remarkably thin (reminded me of the original Premier Cabria shell).
The hardware was a bit "basic" and light, but seemed capable of performing its assigned tasks with no ill-effects....under normal conditions.
...and its pretty hard to beat that price. The 5-piece kit was going for $349.



Elvis
 


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