Which band replace their drummer for a better technical drummer that ended up not working as well for their songs?

Tmcfour

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Back when Matt Sorum was with the Cult, he was only their touring drummer (where he was stolen by G&R while they were on tour together.) Mickey Currey, Brian Adams long time Drummer recorded The Cult albums during that period.
Huh. How bout that. Well then Mickey Currey worked perfectly. Haha
 

BennyK

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Clyde Stubblefield Jabo Starks - the chosen ones

Greg Errico - pocket chiseled in stone
 

stevil

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Guns N' Roses with Matt Sorum. Better drummer than Steven Adler, but something wasn't the same. Maybe not enough cowbell.
I was going to say GnR too. Although, to be fair to Sorum, I think the serious loss was Izzy Stradlin, not Steven Adler.
 

ThomFloor

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.......I saw PJ in 1995 with Jack Irons - he had no energy for a band that was full of energy that day.
Because Irons was very ill, and also suffering from severe carpal tunnel syndrome during tours.
Abruzzesse fired from PJ for one reason only - he liked the rock and roll lifestyle and Ed Vedder didn't like him one bit. Or so it reads in mots books on the band.
 

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I included "technically better" because that is what I was curious to hear about. Like sometimes, you realise that a vary basic drummer like Phil Rudd works perfect for a band, and replacing him with someone with more skills and chops doesn,t make the band better. I mean you can replace a drummer that is ok with a much better technical drummer and the band will just take off (like Nico with Iron Maiden) but I am curious about the opposite.
I wouldn't call Clive Burr just ok. He composed arrangements for the songs, Nikko just plays time.
 

tdcrjeff

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I preferred original Concrete Blonde drummer Harry Rushakoff over replacement Paul Thompson from Roxy Music.
 

studrum

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What about Petty and The Heartbreakers ? There's a lot of love for Stan, I wouldn't say dislike of Ferrone as much as the love of Stan's feel and interaction. Which is what Tom didn't want anymore. Besides the drama :)
For me, this is a prime example. Ferrone: by all accounts a great guy, EXTREMELY strong and consistent player, but it's all too clean, not as expressive or creative as Stan Lynch. What the producer men wanted, probably.

Martin Chambers is another apt example.
 

Maggot

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The doom band OM. They started out with Chris Haikus, who wasn't very technical, but had an elephantine swing, and they lost something when Emil Amos, who has a much more varied repertoire, joined instead.

With Haikus:

With Amos:
 

dcrigger

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I included "technically better" because that is what I was curious to hear about. Like sometimes, you realise that a vary basic drummer like Phil Rudd works perfect for a band, and replacing him with someone with more skills and chops doesn,t make the band better. I mean you can replace a drummer that is ok with a much better technical drummer and the band will just take off (like Nico with Iron Maiden) but I am curious about the opposite.
Fact is I don't think the premise you're asking about happens - or has happened - all that much at all.

I've never heard of anyone looking for a player that is "technically better" - or worse - folks are always looking for "what works". For the music they are trying to make.

So that - plus personality fall-outs, etc. - accounts for nearly every drummer-swap mentioned in this thread. Things either fell apart personally or business-wise - or the band redefined or reinvented itself over time (and the original drummer no longer "worked").

Fact is - it like a trying to manufacture a perfect storm to create something that "really works" - so it's should be little surprise that few people can recreate that magic more than once.

One last thought - everything above "incompetent" is "technically better" - but at a certain level of competency, what playing traits a player may demonstrate can vary greatly... and each possible trait/ability/skill may or may not be that useful for the music that a particular band plays. For instance, the ability to play a wide variety of styles is of little value in most bands. Same for the ability to play with a wide dynamic range. Sight Reading - some situations an absolute, others... not at all. Creativity? Sometimes, yes. Othertimes.... not so much. Ability to play fast and complex. The ability to play wicked simple.

Mastering as many of things as possible gives us a shot at a wider variety of opportunities. But for any one gig,,, any one band... all the matters is whatever skill set is required to make that specific band really "work".

So again - in my experience - rarely does anyone think of it in the terms you're asking... they're either making a change because they have too (business, fallout, death, etc.) or they want to do something somehow different than they were doing before... which puts them at square one... hoping to find that right combination of players to create a new "perfect storm".
 

supershifter2

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This came from Judas Priest back in the day. Drummer Les Binks playing worked great but he was let go because JP wanted a drummer with a simpler straight ahead rock beat. Les was considered more of a jazzy busy drummer. Dave Holland was available and was ask to join and the music continued to be great. Then JP wanted heavier harder faster songs and Dave had announced he was retiring. Scott Travis was ask to join and the music continued to be great.

Ritchie Blackmore said he would fire people from Rainbow after a short time to keep the music fresh. In the early 90's I was going to audition for Blackmore after he left DP but he met Candice before I could and I wasnt interested in midevel music so I never auditioned.

Johnny Winter, Edgar Winter , Rick Derringer had many drummers and they all worked great. Imo Richard Hughes and Bobby Ramirez were the ultimate drummers for them.

These are rare situations indeed.

When Tommy Aldridge left BOA that was the beginning of the end. Tommy was not replaceable.

I am not sure Deep Purple could replace Ian Paice.

Jerry Edmonton was an important part of Steppenwolf sound. No other drummers have filled his style.

Don Brewer is 1/3 of Grand Funks sound and not replaceable.

Phil Rudd is not replaceable.
 

SpinaDude

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McCartney?

Seriously, I'm pretty sure Jimmy Nichol made The Beatles worse when Ringo sat out with laryngitis in 1964.

I'd put Eric Carr ahead of Eric Singer and Peter Criss.

Id also rate Phil Rudd 's feel above Chris Slade (personal preference).

The Pretenders realized Martin Chambers is the best drummer for that band, having re-hired him more than once, I think.

Topper Headon was the best drummer for The Clash.

Chuck Biscuits is by far my favorite in Social Distortion.
Totally agree with Eric Carr. In my opinion his raw energy and enthusiasm elevated that band. I would think he's a better technical drummer than Peter Criss as well, but I could be wrong. As for Eric Singer, great player. I love what he did on the Badlands album. But for me, his feel in Kiss is just mediocre. I'm bored when I listen to them play with him.
 

Bri6366

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But.. Matt Sorum with the Cult worked perfectly. Weird.

Adler had a little more swing in playing to my opinion. He was also working with better written songs though.
Sorum is a solid drummer and I like his playing in general. Appetite for Destruction is an all-time great album. No knock on Adler, but you or I could have played on it. It was a throwback, back to the basics approach at a time when Metal was getting more technical. The follow on stuff Sorum played on didn’t come close.

Ditto for The Cult. Mickey Curry's drumming on Sonic Temple was so good I was always disappointed hearing other drummers plod through those songs live.
 

DanRH

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I'm a rare bird, but I prefer Ferrone. Stan was too floopy and had a kind of wandering backbeat IMO. Steve brings the groove and powers that band. Tom called him a Steam Locomotive - with good reason.

Plus - I really love Wildflowers, Echo, Last DJ - those have some amazing songs on them.
I agree about Ferrone.
 

DanRH

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Well I am going to go with Steve Smith replacing Deen Castronovo in Journey. I know it was a forced replacement, but I love Deen's drumming, and the guy can sing all that Journey stuff. Steve Smith really doesn't resonate with me. It might be his hair cut. :)
Well technically Deen replaced Steve, didn’t he? Love Deens playing and singing, but to me Steve Smith was Journey’s drummer when they were cranking out hits. For me, Steve’s the guy.
 

Prufrock

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Smashing Pumpkins wasn't the same when they recorded and toured without Jimmy Chamberlain.

John Marshall is a great drummer, and probably has more technical chops than Robert Wyatt, but Soft Machine lost a lot of wit and energy when Wyatt was kicked out (and not just from his singing and lyrics). Later Soft Machine can be good, but much more generic jazz-rock than what Soft Machine was originally.

Kenney Jones was a natural replacement for Keith Moon since both The Who and The Small Faces came out of the same musical moment in Britain in the 1960s. Listen to the Small Faces circa 1966-68, and you'll hear Moonesque fills and energy. Not quite the same, obviously, but you can see why it would seem a good fit. As already mentioned in this thread, the fact that Pete (and music in general) was taking a turn towards a more straight-forward approach probably affected things more than the switch from Moon to Jones.

 
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Bri6366

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I included "technically better" because that is what I was curious to hear about. Like sometimes, you realise that a vary basic drummer like Phil Rudd works perfect for a band, and replacing him with someone with more skills and chops doesn,t make the band better. I mean you can replace a drummer that is ok with a much better technical drummer and the band will just take off (like Nico with Iron Maiden) but I am curious about the opposite.
Clive Burr is as good or better than Nicko. Nicko can't hang on Wrathchild. Different styles for sure.
 

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