Who Has (and Hasn't) Worked Their Way through Stick Control?

lrod1707

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Started it like 3 years ago (again) after starting it like 30 years ago for the first time. Lost interest the first time as most young people do. This time, I have all the interest in the world but lack the time to dedicate myself to it. Someday I'll work all the way through it and review it occasionally after that going forward.
 

scaramanga

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The point I was making (subtly?) is that Stick Control (and Syncopation) contain such worlds of possibility in those two pages of each that you don't really need to play "beyond" them. There really is no beyond.
 

drums1225

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Man, even if you never move from the first page (page 5), Stick Control is still worth the price of admission. Want to play linear stuff? It's all right there. When I was practicing this stuff beginning around age 14, I didn't even know how this single page would serve me later, when I began to try and learn complicated "linear-ish" grooves by ear. I refer to grooves as linear-ish when the hands are strictly linear, but the feet sometimes play in unison with hands.

Steve Gadd's work with Chick Corea (specifically, "Nite Sprite", "Samba Song", etc.) employs combinations from page 5, played between ride and snare. The counter-rhythms between the hands were immediately apparent from my time working in Stick Control.

Exercises 5-8 (the single paradiddle and its permutations), alone, cover a lot of ground. Mix and match those 4 stickings and you can play linear-ish grooves for days!
 

toddbishop

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I've practiced almost all of it-- I don't have phenomenal hands, I have normal-good hands. Of course it's a great book, and the things it focuses on are all standard items-- mixed stickings, singles, open and orchestral rolls, flams. My problem with it is that it's hard to treat the exercises as vocabulary, and for me that's really boring. I'd rather practice things that sound like music-- and look like music on the page, if possible.

The stuff in the back is really about playing quality closed rolls at different tempos-- the odd tuplets are incidental. At certain tempos you have to use a quintuplet or septuplet pulsation to get a good roll.

And buy the book. It's $10 and it belongs in every drummer's library.
 

jaymandude

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I've practiced almost all of it-- I don't have phenomenal hands, I have normal-good hands. Of course it's a great book, and the things it focuses on are all standard items-- mixed stickings, singles, open and orchestral rolls, flams. My problem with it is that it's hard to treat the exercises as vocabulary, and for me that's really boring. I'd rather practice things that sound like music-- and look like music on the page, if possible.

The stuff in the back is really about playing quality closed rolls at different tempos-- the odd tuplets are incidental. At certain tempos you have to use a quintuplet or septuplet pulsation to get a good roll.

And buy the book. It's $10 and it belongs in every drummer's library.
I can get with this. It's not the exercises, it's how you use them. And Stick Control is way more usable when you start substituting your BD for you LH. Still good for your hands of course, but once you expand it.......
 

JDA

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If you can't use what you get from the book, to develop musical personal maneuvers.... you have to forget the book after you know the book (or as many parts of it as you please) then at the drums just be yourself and express. Your hands will be trained for lots of -not all, possibilities. but your mind and hands will have been engaged.
 

multijd

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It’s one of the bibles. Its simplicity is the key. There are many variations including playing the hand patterns with different foot ostinatos, reorchestrating the hands etc. one thing that is often overlooked is that 1-12 on p.5 generate all of the rest of the patterns in the book. So if you look closely those first twelve are underneath everything else. Recognizing this increases flexibility, control, consistency and flow. I agree with also “Accents and Rebounds” as a chop buster. All of my students work through Stick Control and Syncopation. Literally hundreds of lessons there.
 
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toddbishop

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I can get with this. It's not the exercises, it's how you use them. And Stick Control is way more usable when you start substituting your BD for you LH. Still good for your hands of course, but once you expand it.......
A lot of that stuff I do with Syncopation-- I mostly want to be thinking of a musical rhythm rather than a sticking pattern. Some things are easier to do with Stone type patterns though, especially in teaching.
 

Skyrm

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Sad to say, never got much past page one. Also had other standard books, but once I got to college I was playing in concert band, jazz band, and percussion ensemble. Some much time spent preparing for those that the other books went away.

Should pull them back out one day.
 

RogersLudwig

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the three holy books of drumming: Stick control, Progressive Steps to Syncopation for the Modern Drummer, and Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer. I use Syncopation and Advanced Techniques more than Stick Control, but they are all excellent books.
 

jaymandude

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Most definitely-- some of that stuff is actually in Reed though--- his other books just have those interpretations written out. But Dawson really ran with it.

I've written a bunch of Reed practice methods myself.
I don't understand you.. What Dawson exercises are in the original Ted Reed book ? Alan was writing that out by hand before anyone decided to publish it. I have copies on ALan's stationary.
 

5 Style

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Man... I always thought of working through that kind of material as the most tedious thing imaginable. I still kind of think the same thing, but as I've been watching more Youtube videos on drumming lately, I'm realizing that so much of the variations that are possible - so much of the "spice," has everything to do with sticking patterns. I try to practice basics concepts that I see in these videos but it's as if neural pathways in my brain don't really connect with this kind of thing as for too many years I've etched pathways in my brain by playing in simpler, more obvious ways. I can play pretty smooth singles, doubles and buzz rolls and I know my way around paradiddles, but I have a lot of difficulty with things like playing sticking patterns that are odd groupings of eight notes (or even groupings of triplets). It's like my brain just wants to square everything off. I really ought to buy this damn book and force myself to spend time with it...
 

Tornado

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Man... I always thought of working through that kind of material as the most tedious thing imaginable. I still kind of think the same thing, but as I've been watching more Youtube videos on drumming lately, I'm realizing that so much of the variations that are possible - so much of the "spice," has everything to do with sticking patterns. I try to practice basics concepts that I see in these videos but it's as if neural pathways in my brain don't really connect with this kind of thing as for too many years I've etched pathways in my brain by playing in simpler, more obvious ways. I can play pretty smooth singles, doubles and buzz rolls and I know my way around paradiddles, but I have a lot of difficulty with things like playing sticking patterns that are odd groupings of eight notes (or even groupings of triplets). It's like my brain just wants to square everything off. I really ought to buy this damn book and force myself to spend time with it...

After a certain point, I just can't either. I'm a broken record around here about snare drum solos. They are way more fun, and you get just about all you need our of them. And nothing etches it in your brain like learning one of these classic solos. I pulled out Stamina the other day after like 24 years. I can still hack my way through it, not continuously, but hell if I can't blaze some 32nd note paradiddles and Swiss Triplets.
 

toddbishop

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I don't understand you.. What Dawson exercises are in the original Ted Reed book ? Alan was writing that out by hand before anyone decided to publish it. I have copies on ALan's stationary.
If you look at the one measure accent patterns starting on p. 56, they're mostly interpretations of the p. 34 rhythms-- 8ths swung, turned into accented triplets. All of Syncopation 2 and Reed's bass drum book are Dawson-style drum set interpretations of the original book. I don't know who did what first, but Reed did include some of the interpreted stuff in his books.
 

paulwells73

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It’s one of the bibles. It’s simplicity is the key. There are many variations including playing the hand patterns with different foot ostinatos, reorchestrating the hands etc. one thing that is often overlooked is that 1-12 on p.5 generate all of the rest of the patterns in the book. So if you look closely those first twelve are underneath everything else. Recognizing this increases flexibility, control, consistency and flow. I agree with also “Accents and Rebounds” as a chop buster. All of my students work through Stick Control and Syncopation. Literally hundreds of lessons there.
Great point, but it’s actually 1-13. Number 13 is four rights and four lefts. Four 8ths in one hand is used a ton on page on page 7, which is why I like that page so much.
 

thejohnlec

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I've been through most of it and have owned 3 copies over the years. I pull it out on a regular basis. It was on my music stand up until last week when we moved, now I can't find it lol :) It is the revered ancient text.
 


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