Who here has skipped/forgone learning doubles on the kick drum?

JDA

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Who wrote this? It's not really accurate.
how can you mess up a three-stroke ruff ; ) lol
that's some random googled off the internet picture
geezus call the police.


 
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toddbishop

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No quicker way to derail a thread than someone making a definitive statement re: drags vs. ruffs I guess....
 

JDA

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No quicker way to derail a thread than someone making a definitive statement re: drags vs. ruffs I guess....
the point was to paint a picture of bass drum doubles - as I think op means (not just any two notes in a row)
to aid him in imagining them; the grace notes being the bass drum the main note the hand (as he understood and thanked me
holly sheeet! lol
 
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Hypercaffium

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I started drumming 5 months ago and decided to learn the hard stuff from the beginning: stick control, rebound, and foot work. I spent approximately 2 weeks working on double strokes exclusively and now I'm able to apply those techniques in my playing, so I guess hard practice worked.
My suggestion is... don't overthink it. Find your own technique and work it, sooner or later you'll learn.
 

poco rit.

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You can totally do doubles barefooted. Theres no need for no slide business to do doubles.

For me, playing heel up with the ball of my foot (and i bury the beater), first hit is like an upstroke, and the second hit is the down stroke. The first hit is rebounded. Second hit is buried. Ymmv
 

poco rit.

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What i did give up on is the Buddy Rich/Joe Morello type “one handed roll” multiple bounce thing. I was like, man im never gonna use this mess. I admire people who can do it tho.
 

5 Style

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It's one thing to learn how to play a single bass drum so that it's machine gun fast and can sound like a double bass. It's another thing though to learn how to be fast enough with it to learn how to play two notes together very quickly... like a "boom-boom" figure that might happen just here and there in a tune. I tend to like playing the kind of stuff that leaves some space so I'm not intested in developing techniques to play really busy patterns. Nonetheless though it seems that there are a lot of figures that require the occasion double hit in quick succession and therefore I'm glad that I've learned how to do that.

There are a lot of techniques, like ghost notes on the snare that I didn't even realize where part of the music until I had been playing for a few years and started to notice some subtitles in lots of stuff that I wasn't initially aware of. Double strokes on the bass might be a similar sort of thing for you; you might actually be listening (and digging) to music that has some of that, but you're jsut not realizing it. Fortunately, at least on a basic level, it isn't something that's very difficult to do....
 

Old PIT Guy

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I can now claim the zero-sum bet of $20 against myself that a thread predicated on eliciting positive responses for not learning something would devolve into arguing over how best to do it.
 

Hypercaffium

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What i did give up on is the Buddy Rich/Joe Morello type “one handed roll” multiple bounce thing. I was like, man im never gonna use this mess. I admire people who can do it tho.
I guess the same can be said about the press roll? I've never used it anywhere, but it's so satisfying to do.
 

mpungercar

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It's been nearly 50 years since I learned how to play a "double", but I don't recall needing a technique to make it happen. I just wanted to learn a song where the drummer was playing bump-bump on the bass drum, so I practiced until I could play it like he did. Eventually I worked it up to where I could play the two hits fairly quickly, never once paying attention to which technique I was using. Thinking about it never made anyone playing better.
 

toddbishop

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the point was to paint a picture of bass drum doubles - as I think op means (not just any two notes in a row)
to aid him in imagining them; the grace notes being the bass drum the main note the hand (as he understood and thanked me
holly sheeet! lol
Relax, I just wanted to know who wrote it.
 

JDA

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Relax, I just wanted to know who wrote it.
..did you get it? an old website from 2012 (I just wanted a picture that's all) did you see?
Chip Hancock's his name.. came up in google with the pic I wanted . will be plenty of time to relax when I'm dead Todd. ; ).
Go man Go. Time's flying.
 
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I can tell you this. When I have taught the slide stroke (best technique IMHO for quick BD doubles for me) to MANY students throughout the years, if they were wearing flip flops they had a really hard time with it. (You mention this in your original post.) Bare feet or socks is also rough because you will mash the tips of your toes against the toe stop (this actually happens with flip flops too.)

Put on some sort of actual shoe (!!!) that has a pretty smooth sole so it doesn't grip the pedal. Try slow slide strokes where you get one note about halfway up the footboard, and a second note at the top of the footboard. Even out the time by playing 2 16th notes with your hands (1 E,) and 2 16th notes with your foot (& A.) Play them as steady sixteenths, start slow, get faster.

As you get the motion down you can increase speed. I view the BD slide stoke as sort of a "double stroke" for the feet. This is the easiest way that I have found to play this quick doubles a' la Bonham, Gadd, Porcaro...

But (I've found) they really don't help too much for anything more than doubles (aka overall foot speed.) However, with some work you can make the slide stroke produce three notes (triples) with one foot.

Or...
(As always)
Get a good teacher to show you this!!!!!
MSG
 

dcrigger

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Are you referring to the names? Because I think they would normally be called 1. Ruff and 2. 3 stroke roll - correct?
So to answer my own question - while what I wrote was correct back when I was taught, it would appear that we've long since clarified some of these names.

Which actual makes sense - as when I was taught, the ruff was LLR - while the 4 stroke ruff was LRLR

And there was the Single Drag - a single stroke plus a "ruff" - but no actually "drag" on it's own.

In hindsight, a lot of it seen kind arbitrarily random.

I mean there wasn't a drag by itself

The Single Drag was a ruff by a single stroke but the "single" didn't refer to the single stroke, but that there was only one drag (ruff) involved. Confirmed by the Double Drag consisting of two drags followed by a single stroke.

Wouldn't "Drag Single" and "Drag Double" made more sense??

Not that the names matter on bit... :)
 


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