Who Is the Best Rock Drummer of 2019?

Vistalite Black

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Musicradar.com says its time to crown the Best Rock Drummer of 2019. Be sure to vote before the polls close on Nov. 20.

Please note that you may not familiar with ALL of these drummers because (1.) the publication is British and (2.) whoever selected the candidates seemed to take pains to exclude drummers who chiefly play FM radio hits recorded from 1970 to 1980 and wearers of hats and indoor sunglasses.

The criteria seems to be "active in last year with new records and/or touring."

I take some pride in having heard of all but one, having listened to all but three and having seen four, possibly five, play live in the flesh.

Tommy Aldridge – Whitesnake

Travis Barker – Blink 182

John Beavis –Idles

Jack Bevan –Foals

George Daniel –The 1975

Joshua Dun-Twenty One Pilots

Taylor Hawkins –Foo Fighters

Aric Improta –Fever 333

Zah Lind –Jimmy Eat World

Mat Nichols –Bring Me The Horizon

Scott Phillips –Alter Bridge, Creed

Rufus Tayor –The Darkness

Sebastian Thomson –Baroness

Eddie Thrower – Lower Than Atlantics/Busted

Ronnie Vannucci –The Killers

Pat Wilson –Weezer


Since you're wondering, I cast my ballot for Sebastian Thomson, though I found it odd he isn't on the separate Best Metal Drummers of 2019 ballot.

Here's where to vote: https://www.musicradar.com/news/who-is-the-best-rock-drummer-of-2019
 
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davezedlee

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Ronnie Vanucci gets my vote.... stumbled on this concert footage and had NO IDEA he was this varied/complete; his studio tracks never hinted too much (to me)

 

thenuge

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A reminder to haters and VB as well that the first (or near first) vistaliteblack post was not what has come since. If it was all bs, then all good, but can we please have more of the first post bs..especially the last sentence of it..please? Here is his/her first post:

"My father was an anthropologist, and the travelled into the deepest jungles of the Amazon to work with the indigenous peoples there. These were tribes who had had absolutely no contact with the "civilized world." Of course, Dad brought us with him since he stayed with the Terena people for almost the whole year. After all, it took 17 days just to reach the village via floatplane, motorboat and then canoe. That's how far up the Jutai tributary they lived. In the evenings, with no TV or radio--or anything really after my Gameboy batteries died--we'd spend our nights as the Terena did--sitting by the fire, exchanging stories, sometimes singing and, of course, drumming.

Night after night, there'd be drum circles--sometimes related to religious rituals, sometimes just to pass the time and entertain our selves. Goat-skin drums, hollowed logs, handmade shakers, improvised percussion sticks from hardwoods... we used it all, and it all contributed to the rhythms that anywhere from 10 to 40 people could produce together. Sometimes, we'd drum for an hour or so, and sometimes it would be six or seven hours. As we drummed, the Terena women would dance enchantingly.

I never partook in the ayahuasca or hallucinogenic jasmine teas that set the Terena men and women completely out of their minds (because I was only 13 or 14 and my Mom wouldn't permit me to take as much as a toke of manaca). Yet, through the drumming alone--along with the fire, the dancing, the women--I also achieved transcendent states. Sometimes, it was like a trance, sometimes it was just an incredible feeling of well-being, but the drumming just make me feel high. On some nights, it was just an incredible out-of-body state that's hard to describe, except to say that very attractive Terena women would often try to lure me away from the fire (because they were so fascinated by blonde hair), but I enjoyed the drumming so much that I was sometimes a little bit reluctant to go with them, though I always did.

After four seasons in the jungle, my father's grant ran out, and the whole family had to return to the States. It seems weird, but as remote and primitive as the Terena village was--I was deeply homesick while living a somewhat privilieged suburban existence. My mother recognized this almost immediately, and when her book about the Terena was published and became a bit of a sensation in the academic world, she used the first check she got from the publisher to buy me a drum set. It was the late 70s, and she bought me exactly what I wanted, Ludwig Vistalites in black. I still have that set, and when I go down to my basement and play--along to the one cassette tape I was able to make of a Terena drum ritual before the recorder's battery wore out, I still am able to reach a state of transcendence without any drugs or alcohol whatsoever. My family thinks it's weird that I play wearing only my underwear--and that I don't play any rhythms they recognize--so I mostly play when they're not at home. In short, I drum because it connects me to the people who lived at one with the earth in a place that was very far away and very long ago."
 

RogersLudwig

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As an anthropologist, that is really cool and I am glad to know about VBs background. I work on the other side of the continent in Peru. Thanks for posting!

That being said, I vote for the same guy I voted for in 1964, Charlie Watts.
 

Vistalite Black

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A reminder to haters and VB as well that the first (or near first) vistaliteblack post was not what has come since. If it was all bs, then all good, but can we please have more of the first post bs..especially the last sentence of it..please? Here is his/her first post:

"My father was an anthropologist, and the travelled into the deepest jungles of the Amazon to work with the indigenous peoples there. These were tribes who had had absolutely no contact with the "civilized world." Of course, Dad brought us with him since he stayed with the Terena people for almost the whole year. After all, it took 17 days just to reach the village via floatplane, motorboat and then canoe. That's how far up the Jutai tributary they lived. In the evenings, with no TV or radio--or anything really after my Gameboy batteries died--we'd spend our nights as the Terena did--sitting by the fire, exchanging stories, sometimes singing and, of course, drumming.

Night after night, there'd be drum circles--sometimes related to religious rituals, sometimes just to pass the time and entertain our selves. Goat-skin drums, hollowed logs, handmade shakers, improvised percussion sticks from hardwoods... we used it all, and it all contributed to the rhythms that anywhere from 10 to 40 people could produce together. Sometimes, we'd drum for an hour or so, and sometimes it would be six or seven hours. As we drummed, the Terena women would dance enchantingly.

I never partook in the ayahuasca or hallucinogenic jasmine teas that set the Terena men and women completely out of their minds (because I was only 13 or 14 and my Mom wouldn't permit me to take as much as a toke of manaca). Yet, through the drumming alone--along with the fire, the dancing, the women--I also achieved transcendent states. Sometimes, it was like a trance, sometimes it was just an incredible feeling of well-being, but the drumming just make me feel high. On some nights, it was just an incredible out-of-body state that's hard to describe, except to say that very attractive Terena women would often try to lure me away from the fire (because they were so fascinated by blonde hair), but I enjoyed the drumming so much that I was sometimes a little bit reluctant to go with them, though I always did.

After four seasons in the jungle, my father's grant ran out, and the whole family had to return to the States. It seems weird, but as remote and primitive as the Terena village was--I was deeply homesick while living a somewhat privilieged suburban existence. My mother recognized this almost immediately, and when her book about the Terena was published and became a bit of a sensation in the academic world, she used the first check she got from the publisher to buy me a drum set. It was the late 70s, and she bought me exactly what I wanted, Ludwig Vistalites in black. I still have that set, and when I go down to my basement and play--along to the one cassette tape I was able to make of a Terena drum ritual before the recorder's battery wore out, I still am able to reach a state of transcendence without any drugs or alcohol whatsoever. My family thinks it's weird that I play wearing only my underwear--and that I don't play any rhythms they recognize--so I mostly play when they're not at home. In short, I drum because it connects me to the people who lived at one with the earth in a place that was very far away and very long ago."
Thanks for re-posting, Nuge. It’s always nice to be reminded of a wonderful time in my life.
 

Bandit

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As an anthropologist, that is really cool and I am glad to know about VBs background. I work on the other side of the continent in Peru. Thanks for posting!

That being said, I vote for the same guy I voted for in 1964, Charlie Watts.
Charlie isn't even the best drummer on the Stones! :)
 

SKSMITH

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Interesting story, what's the title of the book your mother wrote?
Only thing I could find online is "The Terena and the Caduveo of Southern Mato Grosso" by Kalervo Oberg, which is out of print.
Kalervo Oberg died in 1973 and was a Canadian man.
Jason McGerr of Death Cab For Cutie is a pretty talented drummer that could be on this list.
 

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