Who Would You Have Picked to Sub for Ringo in 1964?

hsosdrum

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Remember, George Harrison initially refused to do the tour at all without Ringo. Brian Epstein had to do a lot of convincing to get him to participate. So they needed someone without a reputation, ego or agenda; someone who could do the job without shaking up the status quo within the band. Epstein made a very shrewd choice in Nichol. He had the look and could cut the parts on stage but was never a threat to replace Ringo.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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Personally, I think Epstein should have postponed the shows. Ringo recovered from having his tonsils removed in a very short time. If I had purchased a ticket, I would have been hugely disappointed without Ringo driving the band.
 

hsosdrum

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Personally, I think Epstein should have postponed the shows. Ringo recovered from having his tonsils removed in a very short time. If I had purchased a ticket, I would have been hugely disappointed without Ringo driving the band.
That's what Harrison argued they should've done, and it was why he had to be talked into participating. Epstein and Martin were more concerned with capitalizing on the band's huge popularity. I don't know if you're old enough to have been around in 1964, but the biggest question attached to the Beatles at that time was "How long will they last?" During the first half of the year the smart money was on "around 6 months". But after the film "A Hard Day's Night" proved to be such a world-wide smash and Lennon/McCartney proved they could continue to deliver outstanding songs people began to re-think the band's staying power.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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That's what Harrison argued they should've done, and it was why he had to be talked into participating. Epstein and Martin were more concerned with capitalizing on the band's huge popularity. I don't know if you're old enough to have been around in 1964, but the biggest question attached to the Beatles at that time was "How long will they last?" During the first half of the year the smart money was on "around 6 months". But after the film "A Hard Day's Night" proved to be such a world-wide smash and Lennon/McCartney proved they could continue to deliver outstanding songs people began to re-think the band's staying power.
Oh yeah. I was around then, at 12. Yes, we didn't know if The Beatles would be a flash-in-the-pan, but things were really gearing up for them and all the other British groups, at that time. "Bye, Bye. Miss American Pie".
 

Corbin L Douthitt

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Following on the Jimmy Nichols thread,
Different question: given all the drummers around (let's just consider England for now) in 1964, who would you have suggested to the Beatles as a sub for Ringo during his medical hiatus?

When I started to think about this, I had a hard time, another tribute to Ringo's unique style

not Dave Clark, not Charlie Watts, not Barry Whitwam (a Hermit), not Freddie Marsden (a Pacemaker), not Bernie Dwyer ( a Dreamer), not John Steele (an Animal), not (lesser-known in 1964) Keith Moon, or Ginger Baker, or Mitch Mitchell.

Maybe - Mick Avory (Kinks)?
Maybe Bobby Graham? "He played on such classics as the The Kinks' “You Really Got Me” and “All Day and All of the Night,” "Glad All Over" by The Dave Clark Five, "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place," by The Animals and Petula Clark's "Downtown." (Attributions from https://www.yardbarker.com/entertai...ock_drummers_of_all_time/s1__27174146#slide_7)
Maybe Bobby Elliot (Hollies)?
Clem Cattini?
Why didn't they ask Andy White, or did they? I imagine he heard at least run-through w/Ringo of Love Me Do (meaning, he copied Ringo, not the reverse) and if it's true he is on "Please, Please Me", same thing.
Hal Blaine.
Your choice?

View attachment 477989
 

richardh253

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Thought you meant similar style-wise.
No, I was thinking that song, "Slow Down" is the only one Beatles & Rascals both recorded, the closest you get to a comparison.

I think in 1964 they had to pick a Brit, actually.
 

fusseltier

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Nobody, Ringo played what was necessary, nothing more nothing less.
Anything else wouldn't have made them the band they were.
 

BennyK

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This guy plays every instrument on his tunes , sings and produces too . Whether he knew it or not , intended to or not , pulled a perfect Ringo .

 
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Ludwigboy

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I think Bobby Elliott (The Hollies), if available, would have been a good replacement; a very competent and talented drummer...imho.
 

larold

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It would just have to be someone who could play a steady beat and hit the right accents. As Ringo said, there was no point in playing interesting fills at their concerts — they’d be completely lost in the din of the screaming fans. So, they should have chosen someone they enjoyed hanging out with (they never seemed to care for Jimmy).
 


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