Why do we buy vintage drums vs modern drums?

JazzDrumGuy

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They were US made, older than me aged wood, they sound fantastic, the wood and metal seems more solid, resale value although I normally don't sell and most importantly, the M-O-J-O, baby!
 

bassanddrum84

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So I gotta say I brought my mutt of a Ludwig kit out tonight first time live and I gotta say you were right vintage sounds amazing. Granted I had to re-edge my rack and floor tom but my god best sounding drums live Ive ever heard. Not only did I enjoy them but my band and everyone in the place complimented and asked about them. I received more compliments on That kit then any other kit from dw ddrum Yamaha etc I’ve ever gotten. So I apologize and retract my statement. Not only was the sound on point but the mojo !!!!!!
 
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5 Style

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My couple of old Slingerland kits, sound really nice, look cool and at the time that I bought them where cheaper than anything that I would have liked as much that would be newer. That may have changed though as those kits, along with everything else vintage seem to have gone up in price and new gear seems to have maybe even gotten a bit cheaper for the level of quality that it is. Still for more affordable new stuff, it can be difficult to find the sizes that I like, 20" bass drums and shallower toms and bass drums... Vintage always has that part of it going for it!
 

Houndog

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So I gotta say I brought my mutt of a Ludwig kit out tonight first time live and I gotta say you were right vintage sounds amazing. Granted I had to re-emerge my rack and floor tom but my god best sounding drums live I e ever heard. Not only did I enjoy them but my band and everyone in the place complimented and asked about them. I received more compliments on That kit then any other kit from dw ddrum Yamaha etc I’ve ever gotten. So I apologize and retract my statement. Not o it was the sound on point but the mojo !!!!!!
This is awesome …..
 

SwivoNut

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I play vintage Rogers because:

1. The Memriloc hardware sets up exactly the same every time.
2. The Swivomatic pedal swivels left and right.
3. The hi-hat never creeps.
4. Never heard a better sounding 20"bass drum.
5. Bass drum never creeps.
6. Dynasonic snare is awesome.
7. Handy accessory holders for stick tray and cowbells.
8. Ultra sturdy and built to last.
9. Look good and sound good.
 

Jazzhead

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I love the mojo and design of vintage kits, sound too (sometimes)…
But I think modern kits are more suitable for daily playing, taking it here and there and playing in any situation…
 

JazzDrumGuy

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My maim gigging kit is a Ludwig keystone badge 12/15/20 with a 6.5" modern Black Beauty. It has the diamond plate Mount with a simple Tom holder. I did swap out the when not on both the holder and the base Mount to plastic ones which are easier to close. The kid is solid, looks great in Sky Blue Pearl and sounds fantastic.

I also gig a 60's Slingerland 12 14 18 and for my holiday gigs, a silver Rogers 12 16 20. All look great, sounds great, and there's no difference and set up or roadworthiness of any of these kits versus my modern DW....

20210403_144638.jpg
 

Sinclair

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I don't collect so the only reason I'd buy vintage is to get "that" sound for specific music I play often. The vintage gear consists mostly of 50's cymbals and 2 or 3 old snares, which I don't hesitate to use in any of music I end up playing. The more modern kits I have are a result of this aging drummer trying to sound hip and of course to attract the ladies. "Oooh those drums are so shiny!"
 

OZjazzer

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I’m here to say Ludwig drums from the late 50’s/early 60’s we’re often really badly made. I made the mistake, back then, of selling my beautifully made English Premiers and buying a 1961 Ludwig set simply because my hero Joe Morello played them. You could get splinters if you tried to run your hands around the inside of the bass drum. The chrome became pitted very quickly and parts of the wrap started to lift. I gigged with them for about 10 years (until I stopped drumming) and basically gave them to a kid as they really weren’t saleable. As far as I’m concerned my medium price Sonor drum set (bought when I got back to drumming in 2005) would beat the pants off the Luddies. Funnily enough my original Premiers are still going strong, as is the drummer I sold them to all those years ago.
 

Jazzhead

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I made the mistake, back then, of selling my beautifully made English Premiers and buying a 1961 Ludwig set simply because my hero Joe Morello played them.
Funny you say this because I have a set of late 60’s early 70’s Premiers in black with diamond-like shiny chrome, Pristine condition, build quality is top notch. I often think about selling them and putting another $1k on top of it to get a mid to late 60’s Ludwig set simply because drummers I love played them back in the day (Morello, Mason, Baker, etc.), but I think I will regret it, but the thought stays, it’s frustrating.
 

noreastbob

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There is indeed charm in old things. they show us where we came from and allow us to see and appreciate the progress made over the years in design and manufacturing.
But..... like Neil said, "Old things are good... new things are better." He was addressing drums AND motorcycles, but that's a different thread, if not forum...
I read things like "The wood and metal seems more solid" and "you can hear the human touch" and shake my head at the subjectivity involved in vintage worship. Mojo...yes!!! But it's mojo better suited to looking at than playing in anything other than careful, at home, controlled conditions.
The main difference I can see is the hardware sucked and the drums mostly lacked the tone resonance and sustain of today's better built instruments. I and many of us grew up with that thumpy-whap sound and love it to this day. For me it has it's place and I can get that sound with heads and damping etc... but I can also get my 16" X 14" floor tom (flown) to sing for over 7 seconds if I want. My first kit, Ludwig Club Dates, (yes, silver sparkle) could not do that, period.
 
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