Why is the Ludwig Super-Sensitive from the 1970's not in demand

kenshireen1

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I have a 1970's SS which is in mint condition 5X14... but it appears it is worth less than the regular supra.
I don't get it
 

Paradiddle

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That strainer has always scared people. I have a SS black beauty from the late 70's. One of "the" BB snares to own. Put a difference strainer on it for ease of use and it's a workhorse.

Got it for less then a "normal" BB. :)

Jeff
 

Tama CW

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Give it enough time down the road. Mint, surviving examples will out-pace the much more common Supra. Could be a long time though.......

Not really all that complicated since these drums were around in the 20's/30's and many survive today. Tama's Kingbeat was one of Ludwig's competitors in the later 70's to mid-80's and those have never been shunned quite like the Ludwigs. Though the KB's did come with die cast hoops, steel shell, and were marketed as rock snare drums. I'd much rather have a nicely working SS with minimal to no flaking than a more beat up Supra. I have one of each in nice shape.
 

jptrickster

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Had a bunch, great sounding and playing snare drum. I have to agree, just a bit much on the mechanics and the flying bridge apparatus that can really get in the way and get banged up really easily. Ideal drum for the concert drummer, would be my go to, so smooth and articulate when properly set up. Not the ideal club drummers snare.
I see quite a few out there that have been gutted and morphed into a regular Supra for less money than a stock one.
 

NewBeat

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They quite commonly have strainer problems - sticky, bent, crooked, hard to throw on or off, don't engage the snares properly or fully, wires are hard to come by, etc.

I owned a first run SS in the very late 60s. That mechanism was slightly more robust but a little harder to adjust (much smaller tension wheel). I took care of it and it worked fine. However, many of the ones I've encountered in the field belonging to concert bands, wind ensembles, schools, or orchestras typically had hosed strainers in one way or another.

A truly mint one would easily be worth a supra, but I think most working drummers would just as soon skip it.
 

TrickRoll

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I gigged a SS playing fusion in the early 70’s. It was a wonderful drum.

I think the SS, like the Dynasonic, excelled at setups/tunings that weren’t that common or popular for the era.
 

mlucas123

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I just bought a nice 90's model. Love them.
 

spaeth

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I have one that is regularly gigged for years. Most parts easy to get. With a little care no problems at all. Not anymore care than my other snare drums. I handle them all pretty carefully. Love my Super Sensitive. I guess that doesn't answer your question but I do think it is the appearance of possible issues that scares people away.
 

CAMDRUMS

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I think because (1) Bonham didn’t play a super sensitive and (2) the strainer mechanism scares folks off.
 


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