Worst thing about modern drums?

Power toms? Beer can kick drums? Other?

  • Power toms

    Votes: 11 5.9%
  • Bass drum depth>diameter (aka "The beer can")

    Votes: 68 36.6%
  • Fiberboard shells

    Votes: 9 4.8%
  • Slotted/hole-saw snares

    Votes: 20 10.8%
  • Painted lugs and hoops

    Votes: 32 17.2%
  • Double kick pedals

    Votes: 8 4.3%
  • Boutique drums that cost more than your car

    Votes: 20 10.8%
  • other...

    Votes: 18 9.7%

  • Total voters
    186

hepkat

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The superficial marketing and reliance on images of endorsers I don't care about. Always striving for new extremes and going for the rad angle. Enough with the kids stuff...
 

Bluesman

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Worst thing about modern drums?
I am 100% sick to death of seeing 18x22 BDs from every retailer of drums on the market.
yeah, I know there are a few exceptions, but very few.
Give me a 14x20 or maybe even a 16x20. I don't need my bass drum to house a family of midgets.
 

tgregorek

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OK Just for the record, Slingerland in the 1957 catalog sold the "Bop Kit". It was an 18" x 20" floor tom set up with an upside down kick pedal Cocktail style. and a 13" x 5" snare drum. It had mounts for 2 cymbals on the side. Now the interesting part Is that the bottom hoop was wooden so that you could lay it on it's side and play it like a "Beer can" It's shown in the catalog both way's. So the super deep Kick drum is vintage and not new. And Just so you know I have one I rebuilt out of an early 70's 18" x 20". I manufactured the pedal mount and flipped an old Pearl pedal I had laying around.
 

Titus Pullo

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You just have to worship Mojo as a marketing device. It's hands down the greatest snake oil in existence because it's not only subjective and intangible, but can also play to an emotional and ideological bent on anything from brand to where it's been to who's owned it and more. Better yet, in many cases you have nothing to prove in order to use it one way or another. Mojo is to musical instruments what size is to a fish story.
 

psalty

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Trouble with new drums is they're new. Trouble with old drums is that they're old. :banghead:
 

nanonoize

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i like old and new stuff as long as they sound great
 

TommyWells

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I think I just read an encyclopedia. I voted for the painted hardware. Powder coat comes off much more quickly than most chrome.

Next: I've always been a 14" depth bass drum guy. I love my drums of that size. BUT, I have found that engineers LOVE the 18 and 20 depth bass drums. Why? Because they can put a mic inside the bass drum, and it is ISOLATED. Making it easier for them to get the sound they like and without affecting the overheads, etc..... SO, even though, i don't play a 20 x 22 live, I am playing one in the studios. And you know what? It doesn't even hurt, a little bit.

I love my 40 year old Gretsch drums. I also love my 2 year old Gretsch Catalina Club, (asian firewood) drums. They are sounding great in the studio. I am starting to play one of those sets live, too. Not the one with the 20" deep bass drum, though. :icon_smile: I actually have one of those sets with a 14 x 22 bass drum. When I have to carry drums myself, (no cartage,) I play my Cats. They are VERY light. Along with my flat based hardware. And it's all modern stuff. Ha .... :icon_smile: I try to take the best of the old and the new. Then I do what I have to, to give it the MOJO, myself. That's MY job.

This was a fun one.
 

jvals

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i had to go with boutique drums. I have a mahogany gretsch set, that sounds like a million bucks when its tuned up with some tasty Ec2's.
 

Scottlogsdon

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Actually Steve Smith used a Signature Bubinga kit. He had it custom painted red :blink:

They have Steve Smiths orange Journey kit for sale at my local drum shop. It's a Phonic Plus.
As far as I've been told, that red signature kit Steve played was used for a few ad shoots and in his first instructional video, but he didn't own it.



If you're talking about the Journey kit at Donn Bennett's, it's a Phonic (not plus) from about 1978. The pluses didn't come online until 1983.
 

Buhkatski

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My only problem with the "Boutique" drums is that they are ALL keller shells...I dont have a problem with keller per se I have an 06 DW with a 18X22 Kick the kit records GREAT but when I want something with a unique character (and LOUDER than the DWs!) its my '58 and '62 Ludwig Frankenkit. If everybody is using keller as there starting point how unique sounding is that kit gonna sound?
 

esooy

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My only problem with the "Boutique" drums is that they are ALL keller shells...I dont have a problem with keller per se I have an 06 DW with a 18X22 Kick the kit records GREAT but when I want something with a unique character (and LOUDER than the DWs!) its my '58 and '62 Ludwig Frankenkit. If everybody is using keller as there starting point how unique sounding is that kit gonna sound?
I've heard plenty of Keller shelled drums that are barely passable as drums. People have these wacky voodoo theories about bearing edges, snare beds, etc., that aren't tested any further than their bedroom, which results in a hunk of junko.
 

JackieTreehorn

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Worst thing about modern drums?
I am 100% sick to death of seeing 18x22 BDs from every retailer of drums on the market.
yeah, I know there are a few exceptions, but very few.
Give me a 14x20 or maybe even a 16x20. I don't need my bass drum to house a family of midgets.

Rock on!
 

tgregorek

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I'm sure I posted this before but I will repeat. I ran into the Yamaha rep at DCI a couple years ago. I told him about my vintage Slingerlands and my sons Ludwigs. He said they can't make drums like that any more because the glue had formaldehyde in it and is illegal now. The old shells were 3 or 5 ply with reinforcing rings. Making a thin but very resonant shell. The new drums are one thickness and have a different bearing edge. So since the manufacture is different the sound is different. The shells are much thicker and don't resonate as much, you get more of a head sound. Not better or worse just different.
 

Slippy

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painted hardware is for me the worst... i actually love the look of the deep bass drums, the sound is killer, just my $.02
 

kdrummer

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I have two Ludwig bass drums 14 x 20 and 14 x 22. I like the 14" depth not only for tone and responsivness but also for the fact that they fit easily on small stages.
 

Peterk256

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Hanging "floor toms", fusion toms (especially 10"), tom mount too far away (especially for a 10" in the "normal" left position). I think that providing fusion sizes for the "standard" kit is a conspiracy to give you less wood for the same price.
 

jonesy

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Big horrible modern stands and hardware and RIMS (what's that all about?!). I used the house kit at the club I played at the other day and the stands and tom holder were huge and heavy but they were far more wobbly than my 60s Ludwig stuff. Weight and bulk have been substituted for good design.
 

Thud

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I agree and disagree with so much of this thread that I have no idea where to start.

I love the sound of my vintage kits, but by vintage I'm starting in the 1960's. By this point drums were making killer sounds and becoming pretty darn durable as we were shifting into a new era of Rock & Roll (I know rock started earlier, but really bashing them, not so much. There a big difference between Krupa's bashing to Moon's. I have a lovely pre war WFL kit, but I would never take it to a gig or even rehearse with it as I am an an unabashed basher. Vintage snares, are different. I don't love the sound of my Ludwig & Ludwig, but I do love old Brass with modern wires. They sound amazing.
As far as my 60's, 70's, 80's, 00's Ludwigs, I think they sound MIGHTY! My 80's Recording Customs sound fantastic, but the vibe is very different and I guess a bit more controlled maybe. And on that set, I love my hanging floor toms! Very resonant and fill the room with tone. And frankly, when I got my 60's Ringo kit, it was after I'd bought the Yammies and been playing them for years, so I didn't expect anything out of the Luddies but a nice conversation piece. Then I put heads on it. I was completely floored by how good it sounded. It eventually became my go to kit. When I bought my '04 Classic Maples, again, I was just buying them so as not to tote my vintage kit around so much as it is pretty valuable, and again, I didn't really have high expectations, but just wanted a newer Ludwig kit. It sounds GREAT! I found it similar to the 60's kit in sound actually. I hate the spurs (huh! modern :p) but the kit sounds fantastic. Then I bought a really cheap 80's USA Rockers set so my daughter could paint it all crazy. And low and behold, that $150 set sounds like Ludwigs too!!
But as old vs. new drum sets go, some may sound better, or more specifically sound more like the sound in our minds eye, than others. And if you can find that sound, or tune your kit to a close approximation to it, you're doing pretty well I'd say.
On the double bass thing. I have never owned a double bass kit, but a few months ago I saw this photo of Louis Bellson with his and thought 'that is so bad ass!' that one of these days I'm getting a second bass drum for one of my kits. EVEN IF I DON'T PLAY THE THING!! It's a really great look. but then.... i'm a breast and butt man so....I think I know why I'm liking it.
Now, I read someone on this thread knocking some of the cheaper kit's by Tama and Yamaha. I've played on many of the budget kits and I find them to be quite good for the money and well worth it to get your foot in the door with a respectable name on your bass drum. Rockstars with G2s sound pretty effin' good and feel good under the stick. Yamaha has been making great cheap kits going back as far as the old DP series for sure. And even though I hate Pearl hardware, I can't fault the warm sound of a set of old Exports when they have decent heads and are tuned correctly. My daughters 1st kit was a set of 80s Exports that I paid $169 for and they sound killer! I've actually gigged with them! She now proudly owns a set of 60's Trixons that are one of the loudest drum sets I've ever heard.

My vote in the poll was painted hardware. I don't care for the look. that is all.

My rant is now closed.
 

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