Worth having 2 kits ?

Rodrigo Cezar Berto

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I leave in Brazil. Here I have 2 DW kits, one smaller (10x20, 5x10, 6x12, 6x14) and another “big” (18x22, 8x10, 9x12, 11x14) and 5 snare.
Hello all,

I just bought a new Canopus set but I still have a sonor AQ2 left over. I'm wondering if it's worth keeping or if should sell it and get a new cymbal from Matt Nolan. Thanks!
 

Fibes

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I have what you could consider 2 Fibes Austin Jasper kits, with a few extra pieces, all in their "Mardis Gras." kit 1 is 18x20, 14x14, 9x12, 8x10. Kit 2 is 14x18, 8x12, 14x14. Also have a Corder 16x16 Jasper shell (soon to be finished in same color) and a Austin Jasper 12x20 kick. 5 x 14 and 6 x 14 Austin Jasper matching snares, and I keep a '61 Supraphonic and a Gretsch '71 wood shell 4108 close by. This allows me to keep a kit set up at home for recording/shedding, and many options for gigging a 4 piece up to a larger kit (not that I do much of that.) Primarily at home learning Jazz standards...
 

Sammybear

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I had 2 kits, a bop kit and a Club Date kit. Both Ludwig Classic Maple. One in Natural Maple, the other in Charcoal Shadow. I sold the Club Date kit mainly to reduce my footprint, ease of toting, etc. I now wish I had a 20 kick back to augment my setup. Both kits had/have a double tom mount as well as a single tom mount to provide further flexibility. I like the idea of a 2nd kit, but not enough space. Next best thing is to have two kick sizes with 4 or 5 piece flexibility. Only problem....Now my rack toms are Charcoal Shadow (bought new and separately thinking I'd get that new 20 in a Charcoal Shadow) that ride on top of a Natural Maple kick. Keep the Sonor and buy the cymbal!
 

Howstamychi

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Hello all,

I just bought a new Canopus set but I still have a sonor AQ2 left over. I'm wondering if it's worth keeping or if should sell it and get a new cymbal from Matt Nolan. Thanks!
If you are loving the Canopus and the AQ2 isn’t exciting anymore sell it and sock the $ left over from the cymbal if you can. You can always buy another kit later. Theoretically an AQ2 should end anyone’s need for another kit. Did you lose interest or want different sizes?

Even if you’re gigging the chances of needing a replacement set are slim to none and you have bigger problems than a gig if your kit gets stolen or spontaneously combusts. There’s probably a way to make the gig borrowing or renting.

On the other hand if you still love the AQ2 and the sizes, than consider the price you payed for it vs. what you will likely get for it used and the whole hassle of selling/shipping. All this IMO and before coffee. Anyway sounds like a quality problem:)
 

stick2it

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I find having (at least) 2 kits and 2 sets of hardware is ideal: I have one kit and hardware set always in cases, ready to gig.

Among my few kits, I have an AQ2 bop and I'm considering adding a Canopus bop. Curious to know your own motivations for adding the Canopus (and maybe selling off the AQ2). I'm overall happy with my AQ2 bop; I replaced all stock heads with single ply Aquarians, tuned it up with a careful ear (no muffling), and it sings. I'm not sure whether the expense of a Canopus maple bop kit will be a substantial advance in sound quality over my AQ2 maple bop, even though I know Canopus make exceptional drums and they'd be my first choice today. Be curious to know from you if the Canopus is so much better than the AQ2 (i.e. 3x-4x the price better).

In any case, keep your AQ2s because you won't sell them for enough to make the trouble of the sale worthwhile.

And of course, great cymbals make so much of your sound, so you can't skimp there.
 

Daninflag

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Hello all,

I just bought a new Canopus set but I still have a sonor AQ2 left over. I'm wondering if it's worth keeping or if should sell it and get a new cymbal from Matt Nolan. Thanks!
I love having 3 kits! One for at home practice, one where the band rehearses, and the ready to go kit locked in back of my truck camper. Actually have 6 kits, but who's counting!
 

Slingwig26

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If you have a need, more is always better.
If you are in multiple bands and can leave a practice set at a rehearsal space and different kits for different gigs, ie) big stage set-up or a low volume or small footprint set up.
or, if you are happy with the size of youe new kit and can use for every situation, it is a good idea to have a second kit as a spare, just in case.

Good Luck.
 

WesChilton

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I guess what it comes down to is do you LOVE drums or do you see them only as a tool you need to make music.

If its the former, you will probably buy, collect and play as many drums as you can afford and have space for. If you are the latter, you will probably just have that one kit that makes you happy, and maybe a backup if you are a gigging player.
 

5 Style

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For me it's worth it... I have three. One set up in my basement (that's also my "rock" gigging kit) a bop type kit in cases ready to go (I've played more gigs in jazz jams recently than anything else) and a lesser quality beater type kit that I have set up at any place where I might be regularly rehearsing (it sux to have to drag out, set up and take down a kit every time you play).

I don't really covert drums to collect and to have for every type of music ("this is the kit that I'll use if I ever end up playing in a progressive metal band") but having a few kits for just a couple of distinct styles and so that you're not having to do the whole setup/takedown/schlep thing too much is a very nice luxury. I'd much rather own three halfway decent kits (or on my case, one beater kit) that I can spread around, rather than owning just one super high-end kit and be faced with the hassle of having to move the thing too much.
 

roguefate

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As others have mentioned, I keep two kits as well. Both are Tama. My Granstar Custom is for recording and practice and basically stays at home with me. The second kit (Swingstar) is the one I take out to gigs (when those were a "thing" at least). Once upon a time I had a Roland e-kit but I valued the space in my house more so I sold it on eBay. Occasionally, I am tempted to pick up another e-kit but I can't justify the expense of something that really doesn't sound as good as the Granstar (to my ears).
 

Genr

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To some degree I think this question is dependent on your fiscal condition. If it’s healthy that AQ1 Sonor kit could be a great practice kit. I think keeping it will give you more value than the amount you get get selling it. But I’m up to 6 kits and growing, so I may be a bad influence.
 

fusseltier

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I have an 8 piece star walnut set and sometimes I wished I had a 4 or 5 piece set, luckily I have a 5 piece 4 Roland set.
But sometimes a small set comes in handy.
 

drummer5359

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To some degree I think this question is dependent on your fiscal condition. If it’s healthy that AQ1 Sonor kit could be a great practice kit. I think keeping it will give you more value than the amount you get get selling it. But I’m up to 6 kits and growing, so I may be a bad influence.
Only six? You slacker! I'm thinking that I'm familiar with all of your kits, but I'm sure that I'll get something wrong.

I remember when you only owned the first two listed. Both are particularly good sounding examples of their type.



1980s Gretsch USA square badge

1990s DW black badge

2000s Yamaha Absolute Birch I'm thinking that I got the series right... I'm not Mr. Wizard when it comes to Yamaha.

2010-ish Allegra wood hoop

2018 Gretsch Broadcaster

Vintage Rogers Cleveland

I've played all but the Rogers kit. You were still sorting it out the last time that I was in your part of the world.

You need another kit...
 
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Loud

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Isn’t this question like asking if is it “worth it” to have more friends and family?

:D
 

drummingbulldog

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My thing was one maple, one birch. One Gretsch, one Yamaha. One wmp, one silver sparkle. You get where this is going... One 22" bass drum, one 20" bass drum. One vintage, one modern. One triple flanged hoop kit, one diecast hoop. This started out innocently & turned into gear acquisition syndrome. I now have owned over 20 kits over the past 15 or so years. I own 6 now but only have one set up & play.
 

RIDDIM

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I think it depends on how busy you are, and what you hear.

I like to leave a kit or 2 set up at home (1 under mics), then have kits, 1 tuned for bebop and another for electric music, cased and ready to go. If I have a steady commitment elsewhere - long-term gig, session or rehearsal, it's nice to be able to leave a kit there.
 
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Tom Holder

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I currently own three drum sets, but I'm seriously considering selling my '64 Rogers Swingtime. It's the set that sees the least amount of use. Has anyone else noticed how heavy those old Rogers drums are? I have a 14x22 Ludwig drum that not only sounds better but is noticeably lighter than the 14x20 Rogers. Both drums are from the same era (mid-60's) and both have two rows of lug casings ("Classic" and "Holiday"). At my age (64) I like to travel light! My third set is a compact Frankenstein that I use for tiny stages and practice.
 

Tom Holder

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Further ramblings... I don't think I need any more than two sets. For many years, I felt that one set was enough and sold some beautiful sets just because I thought it was silly to have more than one! Many times I have regretted selling a Gretsch set I had, and a stunning purple sparkle Leedy set that I got for peanuts at a pawn shop. The Leedy drums especially. Regrets, regrets, regrets! I'd rather have those drums back than any of the stuff I have now.
 

Wideglyd

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Always a good idea to have at least 2. I have 5 acoustic kits and 1 Roland TD-17. The Roland is always set up in my practice room along with one of the acoustic kits. I keep another at our rehearsal space and rotate the others in and out and always have one to take on impromptu jams. Where it gets tricky is cymbal sets for all kits and hardware. I’m currently looking for my third job to support my habit.
 


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