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Wrap, Lacquer, or satin?

Ludwig4life

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Am I the only one here who is ok with a kit that’s been worn in?!

I have a laqured kit but don’t mind dings and scratches as long as they aren’t excessive.

Sure if it was a star kit or dw collectors that I dropped a crazy amount of cash on but I don’t mind my painted Ludwig classic maples looking like they’ve been gigged?

Idk maybe that’s just me but I prefer the all wood construction and no wrap even if it means a ding here or there
 

Drdrumdude3009

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Am I the only one here who is ok with a kit that’s been worn in?!

I have a laqured kit but don’t mind dings and scratches as long as they aren’t excessive.

Sure if it was a star kit or dw collectors that I dropped a crazy amount of cash on but I don’t mind my painted Ludwig classic maples looking like they’ve been gigged?

Idk maybe that’s just me but I prefer the all wood construction and no wrap even if it means a ding here or there

It’s funny. Dinged guitars = mojo; dinged drums for some are “abused”. I don’t quite buy into that, btw.
 

Jazzhead

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The old 60's Ludwig wraps were the best wrapped drums ever. The "wrap" was applied while the 3 ply sheet was still flat. It was then bent into a shell and joined with a scarf joint. Re-rings were applied and the shell was finished, so the wrap was actually a 4th ply. No other drum was ever made that way, at least to my knowledge, and I believe that this contributes to the resonance of these old Ludwig shells.
I think late 60’s Ludwigs weren’t like that anymore, right?
 

KingLudwig

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Which one do you prefer and why?

I know now there are different types of lacquer, you can get sparkles. I used to love sparkle wraps for a long time but recently I have started to like wrapped drums less for some reason. I have started to like the sort of raw and natural look of satin drums (natural, black, cherry, amber, whatever).

I know wrap is the most durable but I think my pick would be satin just beacuse of the look and the wood feel and the idea of the wooden shells not wrapped in plastic. Or maybe lacquer for a little more fun and variety.

My philosophy is, wrapped for da road, everything else for the studio/home. Now when it come to snare drums, there are no rules.
 

TheElectricCompany

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I've never liked wood finishes and I would never buy a set with any kind of natural finish. Ringo and Bonham's thermogloss kits are the only natural kits I like, and it's only because of the players.
 

DBT

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Take care of you’re clear coats once in a while and they will take care of you . You can buff out a scratch on lacquer but try doing that with wrap . Part of owning anything you love is having it age gracefully . If it doesn’t look worn it’s not getting used enough . Side Note : what people don’t seem to understand is that if you have a tired looking lacquer kit that you love and gets played that’s not cracking but needs some love , break them down and hit them with some fresh coats and fine sanding / polishing . Not like you are stripping them down and starting from scratch . Just a spruce job and they’ll be ready for the next however many years .
 
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Markkuliini

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It’s funny. Dinged guitars = mojo; dinged drums for some are “abused”. I don’t quite buy into that, btw.

I don't mind dings and worn out look at all. BUT I understand why it's generally bit different attitude towards worn out guitars and drums.

Guitars start to look worn out of you just play them. They are against your body, belt buckle etc. rubs them, the guitar body gets hits with the plectrum, the neck is rubbed with sweaty hands etc etc etc.
The drums start to look worn out if you drop them, miss the head and hit the shell, bump the snare rim against the rack tom, the floor tom leg gives out and the drum takes a tumble.

Of course really old drums will lose chips of paint etc. But generally speaking worn out guitar = hardworking guitarist. Worn out drum = clumsy and careless drummer.
 

Drdrumdude3009

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I don't mind dings and worn out look at all. BUT I understand why it's generally bit different attitude towards worn out guitars and drums.

Guitars start to look worn out of you just play them. They are against your body, belt buckle etc. rubs them, the guitar body gets hits with the plectrum, the neck is rubbed with sweaty hands etc etc etc.
The drums start to look worn out if you drop them, miss the head and hit the shell, bump the snare rim against the rack tom, the floor tom leg gives out and the drum takes a tumble.

Of course really old drums will lose chips of paint etc. But generally speaking worn out guitar = hardworking guitarist. Worn out drum = clumsy and careless drummer.

Certainly.

Though a few lacquer checks, pitting, tape residue and surface rust could suggest hard working drummer, much like a guitar. The ol’ SRV guitar look on drums would mean the drums were certainly abused; finish checking, chrome hazing and pitting wouldn’t necessarily mean abused drums. I think Gretsch tried that and it was nearly universally panned.
 

T_Weaves

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Clear Gloss Lacquer over a sweet wood exterior.
I love a natural wood finish.
Yep, What he says ^^^

Unless it's gretsch then I'd get a satin finish. That lacquer process they use is known to crack/check with exposure to wide swings in temperature.
 

DBT

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Yep, What he says ^^^

Unless it's gretsch then I'd get a satin finish. That lacquer process they use is known to crack/check with exposure to wide swings in temperature.
It’s because of the EZ Vinyl Sealer they switched to . It only needs to be applied once instead of the traditional Instrument Sealer which takes two or three coats and sanding in between . The vinyl sealer is actually too forgiving . They are saving costs . Gretsch likes to state everything is manufactured the same as it always was but that’s not entirely true .
 

Drumskillz

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Nothing matches the look of a stained or lacquered drum set, especially over some exotic veneer. However gloss lacquered finishes do NOT hold up well under road use. I've had many of them through the years and even with the use of cases, they end up dinged and rashed. On the other hand, I have several kits with satin/matte finishes and they take a beating. Wraps are also nice because if you tire of the look of one wrap, you can relatively easily change it out. Also, they are very roadworthy as well.
 

Ludwig2010

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Gloss then satin then Wraps. Wraps just seem like wallpaper to me, the cheap and easy way out. Low rent.
 

Frank Godiva

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I prefer drums looking like drums instead of furniture. But if I had a non-wrap, I would go for an engineered veneer. Aside from Alpi, I know ST Drums has nice veneers and there are some eye catching ones from China on eBay.

You mean like these that have that oak flooring vibe going on

4EB3A993-F4E1-46EA-A4E1-4AAB81560C92.jpeg
 

rsmittee

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I've read lots about looks and durability, but surprisingly nobody has commented on the sound. There's a video in another more infamous thread on here of Russ Miller talking about how a wrap raises the fundamental pitch of the drum. I also had a teacher when I was kid tell me that wraps choke the drum and diminsh sustain, and it always stuck. Personally, until recently I've never owned a wrap kit, largely because of that teacher. But on the wrapped kits I've played, I can't hear any difference in pitch or sustain. Anybody else think there's much impact on sound of different finishes?
 

bpaluzzi

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I've read lots about looks and durability, but surprisingly nobody has commented on the sound. There's a video in another more infamous thread on here of Russ Miller talking about how a wrap raises the fundamental pitch of the drum. I also had a teacher when I was kid tell me that wraps choke the drum and diminsh sustain, and it always stuck. Personally, until recently I've never owned a wrap kit, largely because of that teacher. But on the wrapped kits I've played, I can't hear any difference in pitch or sustain. Anybody else think there's much impact on sound of different finishes?
A properly applied wrap has zero effect on the sound.
 


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