Wuhan durability?

BennyK

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Heh heh you can run but ya can't hide .

I've seldom seen one of those Wuhans without a chunk missing . As far as trash sounds go, these are born that way .

My good buddy and mentor, B. Downey has had one in that spot for fifty years

 

fusseltier

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If you are going to play Chinese junk, might as well save money and get arborea. They make copies of the popular brands. And they are very inexpensive.
Personally i wouldn't want the name near my set, but in poorer countries like the Philippines they are very popular.
 

bodinski

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I bought a fantastic 18” China about 15 years ago for $35. I cut a dozen ozone style holes in it & played the snot out of it. I finally cracked it last year and am heartbroken.
I think most of the breaks that occur are the result of striking them on the bend where they start to roll. That area is stiff & likely brittle. The outer area is typically very pliable, and played with a glancing blow, will withstand a lot.
 

jptrickster

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Generally speaking in my experience far Eastern/Asian bronze is more brittle than the western world and Turkish.
Regretably I have broken a couple Aisian alloy Spizzichino's, Staggs and Wuhans from the early days, they like to radial fissure crack. My suggestion is if your a heavy hitter stay away from the Chinese blanks, your probably going to break them. Nice trash on the Wuhans though.
 

Stephen -peace of art-

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If you are going to play Chinese junk, might as well save money and get arborea. They make copies of the popular brands. And they are very inexpensive.
Personally i wouldn't want the name near my set, but in poorer countries like the Philippines they are very popular.
But Ph is rich in other aspects
 

CC Cirillo

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My experience is only with the Wuhan “China type” traditional cymbal with the upturned edge.

Out of my thousands and thousands of hours of laying hickory to bronze, the only cymbal I have ever cracked was a Wuhan. And it cracked quickly.

I would say if I were into that sort of —what to me—ultra brittle burst of white noise, I must simply buy them two at
a time, always having one for replacement, play them with finesse, and let them swing freely on the stand.

The Wuhan I had did not have much headroom, so if I were a harder hitter or wanted more dbs, I just don’t think they are the right tool for that job. In that case, go with a western brand.

There is a point in my hearing register where all that style of all-frequency-but-no-note sounds the same, so I figure I might as well have something durable.

I’m curious if you Spang-a-Langers playing the ballads and bop of your dreams on your Dream rides have any durability issues.
 

kallen49

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Been bashing my 16" Wuhan for about 15 years and no cracks yet. You can bend it easily. Cost about $30 US. Great white noise.
See if you can pick it out in this cover song I played on for my daughter last year. My Paiste 602 8" bell is also audible in this track.
Drums recorded using one SM57 mic.
FWIW I broke both Zildjian A's and Paiste 602 cymbals in my youth. (cymbals made in the 1970's).
 

Vintage Old School

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I have two Wuhan Chinas from 1984 that are still going strong. I attribute some of that longevity to both being mounted on heavy duty Aquarian Cymbal Springs.
 

mathale

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Another thing is, is that chinas weren't intended to be played upside down (let alone be bashed upon in that position). Whether or not modern companies/indies are accommodating that in their construction, I don't know. But, take a look and watch Mel Lewis or Jeff Hamilton play. That is the intended* playing position.

*Note: I get it. "Intended" is subjective. Innovation is created via change, etc. Got it and I dig it. But, I'm just sayin'.
 

Sequimite

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I bought a Wuhan 11" splash to pair with an 11" thin Zenjian, Z top, W bottom to make a hi-hat pair. I quickly noticed that the Wuhan was bending downward until it was shaped to mirror the outside 1 1/2" of the Zenjian. I was pretty disgusted, but when the Wuhan stopped bending into an upside down swish it started sounding MUCH better as a hi-hat pair. I quite like it now and hope the Wuhan is done bending.
 

flatwins

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I’m not a hard player these days. A couple of months back, out of curiosity, I purchased some Wuhans: a 20” thin crash ride, a 21” med thin crash ride, and 15” high hats. I was thinking along the lines of a jazz setup. These cymbals are thin and trashy sounding and kind of unique. I played them at a cover band gig recently and was surprised at how well they did. The hats were really cool though if I did it over again I’d have gotten the 14s. As far as durability goes, they should last me awhile.
 


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