Your Signature Sound

Houndog

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I've been told by some guitar player that I play in a Russian style. Some singers claim I take a Dragon style. Almost all say my snare drum is loud - they say too loud, I say loud enough. Been working on getting my style consistent, so I can do it all in each song, every night.
If “almost all “ say it’s too loud the others are just being nice .
Why not adjust your volume ???
 

bonsritmos

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i brought in a thread how ive invented a lot of original drum grooves for myself and bands i work with , so , i have my own sound. my kit had a pretty unique sound also but i stopped carrying it around so i play mostly other kits , like here .

but, i play many conventional grooves when called for , but, when ever i can, i play my original signiture grooves i invented for myself

and ive recorded them , they have been played on the radio, and here i am playing an original groove in recife brazil with one of the greatest bass players anywhere , the late paulo russo , who let me go where ever i wanted and could be there for me, and monster trumpeter , fabinho costa, and , now playing with maria rita , raniere ricardo oliveira on piano
 

Bob Blackwood

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If “almost all “ say it’s too loud the others are just being nice .
Why not adjust your volume ???
I do - was exaggerating for effect. Musically, I'm more mature than my off-handed "clever" statement belies. We adapt to the musical situation. Most situation are for me pop/rock/R&B music using rimshots on the snare. Unless they're ballads, then usually rim clicks or dead center playing.
 

Han

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I just pay close attention to tuning. As per usual...my "jazz' kit is higher than my non jazz kit, but I always tune as open as possible.
My touch and technique together with my ideas will determine my sound.
 

Old Drummer

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To judge from multiple unsolicited comments I received when I started playing again after a 30 year break, I'm the Rip Van Winkle of drummers. Lots of people tell me that I'm "old school," and one guy volunteered that he'd only heard playing like mine on old records. These people mean this as compliments. I don't really know what they're talking about--hey, they're old song and I play 'em the way they should be played--but when I listen to the younger drummers, I kind of get it. The younger drummers all kind of sound alike to me, and are almost always too busy.

Besides this, I think I'm what I might call a goosing drummer. I play to the lead instrument or vocalist, and try to push whatever they're doing. When a lead guitarist gets into what he regards as a wild lead, I find myself thinking, "You ain't halfway there yet, buddy." I push him to get wilder. By the same token, I like to drop way back dynamically for some vocal parts or maybe a keyboard to make what they're doing work better. Sometimes I'll even eliminate the bass drum or snare here and there to open it up for a quiet lead. Although I've heard that nowadays I'm supposed to "lock in" with the bass player and maybe crawl into a "pocket," I pay no attention. I go with whatever the lead person is doing.

Anything else distinctive about my playing probably stems from boredom and lack of chops. Years of playing in both organ trios and country bands encouraged me to develop little extra riffs to ease my boredom. So I'll just automatically throw a few additional things in that the less experienced/bored drummer/sideman wouldn't. But because I positively suck as a player now, I keep everything as simple as possible. Forget a "roll around the toms"; my hands could get lost along the way. I'll hit a tom with one hand for an accent, but that's it. It's safer.

I guess I should add that I believe I'm regarded as good at what we used to call "keeping the beat." Fortunately, nobody sets a metronome to show how erratic my beat-keeping is, but I can't stand a bunch of musicians floundering around a nebulous beat. I try to figure out what the beat should be and then just impose it. The anemic playing where everybody is trying to follow everybody else and everybody is left wandering isn't for me. I impose order on that nonsense.
 

jmato

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I don't know if I have a style, necessarily, and like others said, if I do it is probably debatable whether it is objectively a good style at that. But I do play behind the beat (likely due to being taught the drum kit by mimicking Bonham almost exclusively), I have good dynamics, steady timing, and I tend to be a softer hitter most of the time. I cannot get my guitar player to stop slowing down, however, and I am definitely not a soloist. Sounds like many of you replying to this thread are in the same boat.
 

CC Cirillo

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This is based on feedback over the years from bandmates and more musically educated audience members. Apparently, I’m someone who gets out of the way and plays for the song. So my signature sound might be that you don’t notice my signature sound.
If it’s an original song, I let the part progress and pare it down as the song evolves until there are mere references that the band knows, but the audience can only feel. Many bandmates have told me I play for the song, not for myself. I suppose this style evolved through my lack of chops. Sometimes with an original song, if it’s not quite coming together, I’ll play the groove part in two different ways and ask which they prefer, with the singer-songwriter having most veto power.
With covers, my signature sound might have a slightly funkier feel than the original, maybe a slight swing, as that’s just how I play, but I’ll still make large allusions to the original part, particularly if there is an iconic fill or groove. A huge part of my signature sound is that I cannot emulate John Bonham or Neal Peart but can attempt to emulate Roger Hawkins or—perhaps after a gin and tonic—Roger Hawkins.
I do tend to use dynamics, sort of an oddity I guess in a lot of rock. I may push the feel on a bridge or chorus if it adds needed emotion, and then bring it back down to the original pocket feel for the verse. I think this works live nicely on the right song, but I have had bandmates who feel it’s rushing, even if the bpm is more or less the same, just a pushed feel, and they can’t bring it back to the original feel when the bridge or chorus is over. For years I had a complex that I rushed everything because I worked with a bass player who had perfect tempo and any movement felt off for him. Since then with other bands I’ve used LiveBPM app to monitor myself at rehearsals and found that there is not much variance in tempo, and I try to study sections where it could feel rushed as opposed to just pushed. But in all fairness, if I’m nervous I could rush it and I’m mindful of that.
As for the signature sound of my cymbals and drums:
I’ve moved towards cymbals that have a lower pitch. Gone are the thick Quick Beats and brighter A series rides, replaced by thinner or more hammered cymbals. Not trashy but low and crunchy. It took me a while to learn that bright and overly loud cymbals with a lot of sustain don’t work for me. Or my bandmates.
For drums my real “signature sound” is probably coming from my snare drums based on how I hit them. They are tuned mid high. I tend to often play in two zones on the snare: Center for backbeat and off center for ghost notes or rolls or accents for a bit airier sound. Except for a few singular types of driving songs, catching a rim with the head is an exclamation point. On a slower or ballad type song I’ll leave the back beat porky with a stick that’s drop dead on the head for a wider sound, or let it drop and buzz slightly.

Every rehearsal or gig is an opportunity to soar or crash into a mountainside.
 

CC Cirillo

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My apologies. There were paragraphs when I posted that post above.

Apparently one of my signature sounds is also being long winded and unable to punctuate.
 

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