Your WORST studio experience?

equipmentdork

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I don't have any "worst" although (sometimes) recording can be the most unmusical way of making music.
bt
To me, if you have a good song and good players who know the song, magic can and does happen. On a good day, there's nothing like it. On a bad day, with either poor players or equipment problems, it can be like a day at the dentist.

Dan
 

Dumpy

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To me, if you have a good song and good players who know the song, magic can and does happen. On a good day, to me there's nothing like it. On a bad day, with either poor players or equipment problems, it can be like a day at the dentist.

Dan
Would you not agree that so many people underestimate the importance of nailing down an arrangement and sticking to it? My former band leader would get these”great ideas” and then blame the rest of us for not quickly following along. Some people actually think they can “work it out” either on stage or in the studio. Silly thought process, no?
 

equipmentdork

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Would you not agree that so many people underestimate the importance of nailing down an arrangement and sticking to it? My former band leader would get these”great ideas” and then blame the rest of us for not quickly following along. Some people actually think they can “work it out” either on stage or in the studio. Silly thought process, no?
There's a thing that's a mystery to a lot of people called "pre-production" lol. Even so, not everything sounds good upon playback. I like to have melodies and solos worked out in advance. I like to have any outside players familiar with the material upon their arrival at the studio, otherwise, we don't work with them again. Also, when someone says, "Wow! I've never been to a....studio before!", we also do not use them. Playing well live and playing in the studio are two entirely different things. Just because one can play a John Paul Jones bass line, it doesn't mean one could have written it.

I've even seen discussions about this in magazines and forums like this one, people taking gigs and not learning the damn songs. It appears to be a real problem that has only gotten worse in recent years. I hear so many people talking about it.


Dan
 

Dumpy

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There's a thing that's a mystery to a lot of people called "pre-production" lol. Even so, not everything sounds good upon playback. I like to have melodies and solos worked out in advance. I like to have any outside players familiar with the material upon their arrival at the studio, otherwise, we don't work with them again. Also, when someone says, "Wow! I've never been to a....studio before!", we also do not use them. Playing well live and playing in the studio are two entirely different things. Just because one can play a John Paul Jones bass line, it doesn't mean one could have written it.

I've even seen discussions about this in magazines and forums like this one, people taking gigs and not learning the damn songs. It appears to be a real problem that has only gotten worse in recent years. I hear so many people talking about it.


Dan
Nothing to add but that you are DEFINITELY not wrong.
 

mebeatee

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To me, if you have a good song and good players who know the song, magic can and does happen. On a good day, there's nothing like it. On a bad day, with either poor players or equipment problems, it can be like a day at the dentist.

Dan
I'm not talking about playing the toons or parts as that takes care of itself.
I'm talking about the process.....ie someone wants to track the drums separately......BD pass, snare pass,
drums only, cymbals only, recording something to effect the heck out of it or to be played back backwards.
The process may different if you are in a contained band vs being a hired gun, and what the folks who hire you want.....or think they want.....whahaha....
Oh yeah....a number of years ago and some gum disease, I spent an afternoon at the dentist.....came out with a full set of dentures. Recording was never like that, or being "fitted" for said dentures.....:blink:
bt
 

equipmentdork

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I'm not talking about playing the toons or parts as that takes care of itself.
I'm talking about the process.....ie someone wants to track the drums separately......BD pass, snare pass,
drums only, cymbals only, recording something to effect the heck out of it or to be played back backwards.
The process may different if you are in a contained band vs being a hired gun, and what the folks who hire you want.....or think they want.....whahaha....
Oh yeah....a number of years ago and some gum disease, I spent an afternoon at the dentist.....came out with a full set of dentures. Recording was never like that, or being "fitted" for said dentures.....:blink:
bt
Ohmigosh, I've heard about things like tracking everything separately. My feeling is that you can really embalm a performance that way. But, that may be the vibe they're seeking.


Dan
 

KevinD

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Ohmigosh, I've heard about things like tracking everything separately. My feeling is that you can really embalm a performance that way. But, that may be the vibe they're seeking.


Dan
I sort of did something like that years ago in the 90s. Band leader guy owned an early Roland Octapad. Drum sounds were acceptable, (for a demo) cymbals were not real good. We recorded the Octapad drum sounds in his living room (to an ADAT machine) with him playing guitar and singing ghost track (me playing to my a loop from drum machine in my headphones). Then I overdubbed HH and cymbals in a large storage room. Very awkward, and tedious but it came out a lot better than I thought it would have... wouldn't want to do that again though.. I believe Chris Whitten (who has been active here on occasion) recorded the drum track for Edie Brickell' s "What I Am" as separate parts, one could not tell by the results.
 


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