Zildjian 20" A Take Five Reissue Ride Cymbal - Memphis Drum Shop

vinnyrac63

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whoever snagged that 2044 from Memphis congrats. I listened to it at lunch the other day. Decided on my way back to the office that I was going to buy it. When I got back to the office and opened my browser....gone!!!! I hate when that happens. If you don't like that cymbal, don't return it. Contact me.
 
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Seb77

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Nice sounds! I was thinking the pitch on the 2044g was a little low, but then, it's actually a lighter one. The heavier ones do sound higher.

That said, on the original, there is a rather low pitch/overtone present but I think that's due to a lower-pitched stick Morello used. Think of it like a guitar string, you can pluck it the regular way getting all the overtones, or you can mute-pluck and get lower or higher harmonics. Crashing a cymbl is akin to regular plucking, it brings out the whole spectrum, whereas the ride/stick tip sound brings out only certain colours.
 

chillybase

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The demos sound great on this ride. It is on my list as I narrow down a new ride to go for.
 

bjisteve

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What does it say that everyone in the video is white?
 

Markkuliini

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What does it say that everyone in the video is white?
It says that you didn't watch the video that closely. The bass player in Brubeck's band, Eugene Wright is/was black and he can be seen on the video too at couple spots.
Also, what is said about west coast jazz above is correct.
 

bjisteve

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I know who Gene Wright is, and his presence is background. And I took a lesson from Morello in NJ (which is not on the West Coast). Neither is John Riley. My point in asking the question is what does it say about us, about the music, about the scene, about the economics, that all of the people in a video about the history of a significant aspect of a genre created by African-Americans does not include any perspectives outside a very narrow window? Not to mention, what it might say about the fact that it was a white jazz band (despite Wright's involvement) that broke through in America for commercial success, despite the presence of plenty of Black musicians who created accessible music (Horace Silver, Lee Morgan for just a couple of obvious examples). This stuff doesn't happen in a vacuum, and to my mind, those of us involved with the music have a responsibility to understand it's history and context, and maintain a critical eye towards how that hiistory continues to play out.
 

Markkuliini

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I know who Gene Wright is, and his presence is background. And I took a lesson from Morello in NJ (which is not on the West Coast). Neither is John Riley. My point in asking the question is what does it say about us, about the music, about the scene, about the economics, that all of the people in a video about the history of a significant aspect of a genre created by African-Americans does not include any perspectives outside a very narrow window? Not to mention, what it might say about the fact that it was a white jazz band (despite Wright's involvement) that broke through in America for commercial success, despite the presence of plenty of Black musicians who created accessible music (Horace Silver, Lee Morgan for just a couple of obvious examples). This stuff doesn't happen in a vacuum, and to my mind, those of us involved with the music have a responsibility to understand it's history and context, and maintain a critical eye towards how that hiistory continues to play out.
For your first question I don't have an answer.
But I don't fully agree about the second part, since wasn't Kind of Blue released earlier, and hasn't it sold much more?
 

jaymandude

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I know who Gene Wright is, and his presence is background. And I took a lesson from Morello in NJ (which is not on the West Coast). Neither is John Riley. My point in asking the question is what does it say about us, about the music, about the scene, about the economics, that all of the people in a video about the history of a significant aspect of a genre created by African-Americans does not include any perspectives outside a very narrow window? Not to mention, what it might say about the fact that it was a white jazz band (despite Wright's involvement) that broke through in America for commercial success, despite the presence of plenty of Black musicians who created accessible music (Horace Silver, Lee Morgan for just a couple of obvious examples). This stuff doesn't happen in a vacuum, and to my mind, those of us involved with the music have a responsibility to understand it's history and context, and maintain a critical eye towards how that hiistory continues to play out.
And what, may I ask, does that have to do with Zildjian recreating what they feel is an iconic cymbal ? Unless you’re suggesting that they recreate other iconic cymbals, Art Blakey, Kenny Clarke, Philly, and Tony for obvious starters. Or am I missing something ?
 
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JDA

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Hmm wonder how it'd differ from the "Buddy Rich West Side Story Reissue" 20" ride that hasn't yet been reissued pending possible reissue forthcoming later sometime in the future rumored whispered contemplated by completely unknown sources.
 
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JDA

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Also wasn't it Z Policy to 'never' issue signature rides; remember reading that somewhere..
what ink is on the "take 5 Morello" symbol..

I don't think (....) there's any specific permanent (maybe designated in UPC sticker) ID on it.. just an 'inside' 'you know' thing

Ok. ID factors: an old-style stamp on the top and a laser engraved serial number on the bottom. That's how you'll know 30 years from now.
that's it. I think. I knew they hadn't mass-produced (not endorser prototype) any artist model/ cymbals like say sabian or paiste or istanbul or bosphorus..has
 
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Old Drummer

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It's interesting to me that at least a few people here seem to like the cymbal based on the demos by the Memphis Drum Shop. I don't. I like the cymbal when Joe's playing it, but don't particularly like it when played by itself.

I also doubt that the explanation for my opinion is the archer. Yes, Joe played well, but so also does the drummer in the demos. I think the explanation for my opinion is that in one case the cymbal is played in musical context while in the others it is played alone. In context, it works, but played alone, I don't care for it.

It's possible, even likely, that some of the rest of you have a more sophisticated cymbal ear than I have and can imagine a cymbal played in musical context from hearing it by itself better than I can. But it's also possible that playing a cymbal in context masks some of unpleasant characteristics and these are more apparent when the cymbal is played alone.

Of course, it's also possible that people just have different cymbal tastes.

Anyway, I don't really have a point to make here but am just sharing my impression. It is that the cymbal disappoints me in the demos, though I like it in "Take Five."
 

bongomania

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I think the explanation for my opinion is that in one case the cymbal is played in musical context while in the others it is played alone. In context, it works, but played alone, I don't care for it.
That happens a LOT with cymbals. Sounding harsh, weird, dissonant, ringy, rumbly etc. when soloed in a quiet room, but sounding absolutely perfect within the full band mix.
 

Seb77

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It's interesting to me that at least a few people here seem to like the cymbal based on the demos by the Memphis Drum Shop. I don't. I like the cymbal when Joe's playing it, but don't particularly like it when played by itself.
What about the intro to Take Five? It's drums only. Plus, as I mentioned above, the gorgeous reverb of 30th studio.
 

Old Drummer

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What about the intro to Take Five? It's drums only. Plus, as I mentioned above, the gorgeous reverb of 30th studio.
Interesting question and point. I went back and listened to the intro several times as well as the demo, and must say that I liked the cymbal in the drums-only intro but still didn't care for it in the demo. What's the difference? I dunno. The intro kicks off with the snare and goes into the cymbal, plus is short, while the demo is the cymbal alone. Maybe that's it. Or maybe it's the studio or Joe's touch, but the cymbal does sound better to me in the drums-only intro than it does in the demo.
 

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