Zoomatic Question

jwaldo

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I've got drums I have had for years, but have never played. That changed last night. I took my 60's Slingerland snare to the gig last night and all was well; for awhile. I thought I heard it slowly easing away from a crack, into a boing. When I finally decided that I was hearing what I thought I was hearing, I checked to see if the snare side had broken. I found the snares drooping off the head. A quick check of the throw off found it in the proper position. What had happened was that the tensioner knob had backed off. Anyone know if this is a quirk inherent to this hardware?
 

franke

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I've owned maybe five Slingerland COB snares over the years, and have never experience with what you describe (this "backing off" as one plays phenomena is usually the purview of the Ludwig P-85). Usually what happens with the "Zoomie" is the knob falls off on a dark stage where it remains lost forever.

Here's a link where repair and modifications are explained in detail: http://vintagedrumguide.com/zoomatic_strainer_repair.html

The Zoomatic was not only a unusual design, but was in all probability the most expensive to build and unnecessarily complicated approach to a simple "lift-and-stretch" snare strainer that one could imagine. The "tombstone" casing was made from cast steel and its innards featured a reverse-threaded bolt connected to the adjustment wheel (the aforementioned part that usually falls off), that threaded into a (forward-threaded) bushing, that was bolted to the shell. Considering the likely cost that Ludwig incurred with its stamped metal and riveted P-85, it's a wonder that Slingerland was able to price its snare drums competitively.
 

theneonguy

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I like Slingerland but the Zoomatic was definitely not the company's finest creation. Their Chrome-O-Wood drums are legendary, though. Especially the 24" bass. Super heavy, thick, real steel, highly polished chrome, bullet proof, and what power. No bass drum, until I hooked up with my Drum Craft bass, could touch that sound. I have a 22" Slingy, and it's awesome too. 14" x 22", heavy as lead, and killer, deep tone. Getting a Ludwig 24" COW bass in next week. Found it on EBAY, and it should satisfy my need for vintage COW bass power all right.
 

Pickinator

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It just happened to me over the course of the whole night with a new (to me) Powertone. It didn't back off a lot but just enough to need to tighten a half a turn or so after 3 hrs. I still like the drum; crushed red glass glitter Powertone.
 

Rich K.

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Many zoomatics had a gasket behind the knob to help with the loosening of the snares similar to that rubber thing on the rapids. Usually they crumble and disappear.
The spring trick at vintagesnaredrums.com works really well.

And can we please stop referring to Rogers and Slingerland sparkles as "crushed glass glitter"?!?!?

It makes it sound like those companies were offering an option. They weren't. If you have a Rogers sparkle, we all know what it is. Rant over!
 

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